Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: January 2019 Edition

Jan 31, 2019

For the first spotlight of 2019, we’re featuring one of Central City Concern's On-Call Administrative volunteers, Christopher Schiel. The on-call volunteer position is one that allows folks who don’t have consistent time available throughout the week the chance to volunteer on an as-needed basis and support various departments throughout CCC.

Christopher has been one of CCC’s most motivated on-call volunteers and has taken on a broad range of tasks throughout the agency. His consistency, reliability, and unflappably positive attitude have been appreciated by many CCC staff. Read on to hear what Christopher has appreciated and learned and how administrative work has enriched his broader understanding of CCC.

• • •

Christopher helped serve a Thanksgiving meal to residents of CCC's Estate Hotel community in November 2018.Peter: What is your name and volunteer position?

Christopher: My name is Christopher Schiel and I am an on-call administrative volunteer.

P: How long have you been with CCC?

C: I believe it’s been about a year.

P: How did you become familiar with CCC?

C: I knew about the agency from seeing the vehicles around town, but also being aware that there were residential buildings downtown. And I had a superficial awareness of the organization, but not an understanding of what they did besides housing.

P: How did you find out about the volunteer position here?

C: I was actively seeking some volunteer position within the city and I was feeling like housing was at the front of minds, so CCC was at the top of the list. And I found [a position that] I thought was perfect for my skill set, which was project management and organizational stuff.

P: What about admin work was more attractive to you than a role that involved more direct contact with clients?

C: At the time, I was feeling a motivation to do something without really knowing where to start. The housing crisis is something that is very visible on the streets, but there isn’t much of a conversation about why that is beyond reactions on the news, Nextdoor, or from NIMBY folks who are corralling people around the city from one place to another.

My motivation for volunteering was the kind of acknowledgement that I knew that I didn’t know what was going on, really, so I wanted to get involved in some way, not only to volunteer my skills, but to greater understand or explore what is actually happening and admin seemed like the perfect way to do that.

"I’m understanding that the success of the whole mission revolves around a coordination of these services that isn’t obvious on the ground and certainly wasn’t obvious to me before I started"

P: And do you feel that you have learned more about housing and services within housing during your volunteering?

C: Oh, absolutely, yes. My very first task was to interview one of the heads of OHSU and the CEO of a job transition placement group to get their thoughts on the functioning of CCC, as well as their input on [CCC’s] strategic plan. That particular conversation turned out to be very enlightening about the way that this organization collaborates with other ancillary nonprofits throughout Portland. It started to get me thinking about how each of these missions can be compartmentalized and taken by collaborators to a certain degree of good.

Right after that I was doing survey entry for [satisfaction] surveys that were given to clients in various parts of CCC and just doing data entry, but to observe that feedback loop, to see how clients are coming thought the system, going from Old Town Recovery Center to different residential buildings, hearing what is going right what is going wrong, how all these things are cooperating to make not only this organization better but what the greater mission of tackling houselessness and the housing crisis is has been insightful.

P: Do you feel that the role has given you that chance to see how the different parts of the agency feed the greater mission?

C: Yes. My background of project management and data entry led me to believe that a lot of this volunteer role would be sitting at a computer, and some of it has been. But probably some of the more surprising and enlightening parts of this position have been those things that don’t involve a computer aspect.

By being in front of clients, being in the admin office, and working with Quality Management, I’m starting to get a sense of how intricate client-facing services are. I’m understanding that the success of the whole mission revolves around a coordination of these services that isn’t obvious on the ground and certainly wasn’t obvious to me before I started. The intricacy [of coordinating all these services] is kind of infinite.

"To just see the sense of community within that residential building; to see the cooperation, camaraderie and community; and to engage with clients at the level was personally meaningful."

P: Has there been one project in particular that was the most interesting?

C: I’m going to give you two answers. The most insightful experience was the strategic planning interview project, in that I got to hear specialized input about specific collaborations and projects and then I got to engage in conversation on some very high level stuff. So from an admin perspective that was the most insightful. But the most meaningful was serving Thanksgiving dinner. To just see the sense of community within that residential building; to see the cooperation, camaraderie and community; and to engage with clients at the level was personally meaningful. So it’s nice on the one hand to have the 30,000 foot view of admin, and then the ground-level view of daily life.

P: When you talk with others about this experience that you’ve had, what is it that you share with them?

C: I start with the range of services that are provided. I never knew what those trucks were doing, for one. But also that CCC isn’t just housing, it’s not just these buildings in the downtown core, but also the medical and rehabilitative services, counseling, job transition support, culturally specific programs. I emphasize the breadth of those service to people I speak with. It’s not just a bed to sleep in, it’s a range of support systems that allow people to get on their own two feet and eventually build a life.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: December 2018 Holiday Edition

Dec 18, 2018

For this month’s volunteer spotlight, we’re revisiting last year’s holiday spotlight format and posing a new question to a few of our volunteers.

One very big part of the holiday season is the idea of giving. What that means to each of us though, can be very different, so we checked in with a few of our volunteers to ask them, “What does giving mean to you?”

It was so humbling to see how each person, in their own way, expressed that their ultimate way to give was to provide their time and themselves to others in need. We feel incredibly honored to have volunteers that have found such pleasure in giving openly of themselves to others and that they have chosen our CCC community to give themselves to in their service.

Tricia

Tricia: When you say the word giving, the first thing that comes to my mind is time and being with people that are in need of some companionship, or that appear to be in need of it, or want some. For example, in my family, a lot of it right now is around them needing me to help out with grandkids. I intentionally choose to give of my time to them, even if they’re being taken care of in the moment. So there’s the part that’s kind of the needing of my services, and then there’s the part of just giving of my time and myself.

Peter: And isn’t that something we all wish we had more of: time?

T: I think for me that’s probably the strongest thing I have to offer. And that giving could be listening to somebody, it could be taking somebody somewhere, it could be just being with somebody. It’s something I want to do, it’s not something that’s like, “Oh my gosh, I have to.”

So that translates to [the Old Town Recovery Center’s Living Room program] as well. I like being here because a lot of people who are homeless or have mental health challenges or drug addiction… they can be pretty isolated as individuals and so just them knowing that somebody cares about them. I care. I care enough to sit with someone. So I guess giving is more emotional—helping to fill a need that somebody might have, or a want that somebody might have… things that we need, or maybe want, that are good for us.

P: And giving time that openly is really a way of giving yourself.

T: And meaning I care about you. I care. I want to spend time with you. So it’s not like I’m feeling like I have to do it, it’s that I want to do it. Obviously there’s lots of material things, but that doesn’t mean that much to me, personally. It’s really the offering a piece of myself to somebody who looks like they might need it.

."It’s really the offering a piece of myself to somebody who looks like they might need it."

Malinda

So I grew up in a small town in Ohio. At that time what giving meant to my family was, if you had, you gave. Whether it was time, money, skills, whatever—that was just part of life, to share and give. It wasn’t like, “Oh, we’re good people.” It’s just what you do.

When my dad died ten years ago, all these people got up at the funeral and said, “I promised I wouldn’t tell anyone this, but when my dad died in high school, [Malinda’s father] came to me and said, ‘I’ll make sure you go to college. Do not tell anyone.’” Nobody, even my mom knew these things. So giving wasn’t something where you wanted to go “Aren’t I great?” It was never that way. I think [my husband] Doug and I have always felt that way. If you have, give. It rewards you.

You know, we arrived here with no money in 1972, but we had skills, and with skills you make money to donate, which is great fun at our age to be able to do that. But what both of us love to do is volunteer. Giving means volunteering where we’re passionate. So this is for my passion. Giving is finding your passion. Giving is something you do. Giving is something you get to do. It’s our opportunity and people that do it get the reward of being a part of the things we’re passionate about. Not for thanks and not for recognition.

Lynn

To me, giving is, simply put, sharing my free time to help make a difference. Central City Concern changes the lives of so many. I always hope I make someone’s day a little brighter, because sharing my time certainly makes my day brighter.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: October 2018 Edition

Oct 30, 2018

For this month’s spotlight, we’re celebrating National Physical Therapy month and spotlighting a volunteer who has lent her holistic approach to the practice to patients at the Old Town Clinic. Senior Director of Primary Care at the Old Town Clinic, Barbara Martin, had this to say about Anita’s work:

"Anita August has been an ongoing volunteer with Old Town Clinic, bringing in expertise on both general physical therapy as well as specific types of therapy to help with pain, such as persistent back pain. She has been flexible with figuring out what might work best for our patients, including group options or one-on-one appointments. She has also worked around our space and time constraints to help us make the most of her generous gift of time. She is positive, helpful, and supportive of our patients."

Read on to hear about how Anita got involved with CCC, how her practice of physical therapy has evolved over time, and what she admires about the work that goes on at the Old Town Clinic!

• • •

Peter: How long have you been volunteering with Central City Concern?

Anita: I would say over five years, maybe close to six years.

P: And how did you find out about the agency or the opportunity?

A: Well, I lived in the neighborhood and I was very interested in the Old Town Clinic (OTC). I came to the open house for the new building, where I met Geoff, who was the Occupational Therapist here. We got to talking and our ideas were so similar I said “I would love to be a part of this.” And he said, “We can do that!” So that’s how I got involved.

"It takes courage sometimes just to get up in the morning and I’ve found many of the people at Old Town Clinic are courageous."

P: What is your role here now?

A: My role is physical therapy, but not the tradition physical therapy that I have been doing for over 50 years. Some years back, I began to be dissatisfied with how I was treating people. Mind and body are really one entity and that was what I was not accessing in this traditional type of PT. You “fix” a shoulder or a knee, but you haven’t changed the things that were behind that injury.

I went back and took a training course about four years ago in Alexander Technique. This is a system of working with people that is very congruent with Physical therapy. It looks at the way you can change habitual patterns of behavior. That could be how you sit, how you stand. Do you move so abruptly you “glitch” your joints every time you move? Does your posture have the habitual fear or startle tension patterns? Do you fall because you move impulsively and lose your balance? It looks at the subtle, hidden patterns of reaction. How do your react when someone accidently bumps into you? Are there people or circumstances you unthinkingly react to that are not helpful to you?

So that’s Alexander Technique, I think it is the best thing since sliced bread and I tend to go on and on about it. It works really well with Physical Therapy. There is just no gap between the two approaches for me. Alexander Technique may seem more indirect. I see you for a sore shoulder and I work on how you sit and stand to start. But in many ways I think it is actually more direct for getting better.

P: It sounds like it is kind of preventative in a way rather than restorative?

A: Both! It is preventive in a big way. For example, if somebody wants to take up yoga, often people go to a class and after the first or second time they go, they can’t move; they are really hurt. They haven’t known enough to be mindful of how they work to be able to manage themselves in the class.

P: And that’s an interesting thing because we often recommend yoga as a wellness routine despite the fact that there can be that barrier for some folks.

A: Not all Yoga is created equal! Out in the community there are different competencies of instructors. Here at Old Town, I have watched the classes and they are safe and wonderful. But in some community general classes, your instructor gives you instruction and you completely go into that without thinking. You don’t think, “Okay, stop, I’ve had back problems so let me be sure that my head and neck and torso are in a good place. Let me see if I can move that way with healing ease of movement.” Do I go as far as I can, especially if the person next to you is a pretzel, or do I keep good use of myself rather then going headlong into the movement?

But it is not only that; it’s many things. It’s how you react to somebody at work giving you a new task. Do you get so tense that all you can think about is “I have to do this right”, instead of stopping [and thinking], “Okay, let me see what this part is and step one, and step two, and step three.” This keeps you safe and also allows you to do a better job!

"I hear how clients are treated [at the Old Town Clinic], what happens here, and I think it’s exemplary. I think it’s something that should be a model. And I’m really delighted to be a part of that."

P: And is that physical carrying of tension something you see a lot with the population that we serve here?

A: Very much. But it’s not just here! People I see here have been through a lot. They’ve been up and down and they’ve dealt with some tough, tough things in their life. So in many ways, Old Town Clinic clients are more able to understand what I am talking about.

P: Was the population that you served before OTC the same as the one you serve now?

A: I’ve really been around. One of the PT jobs I had was working for a company that did ergonomics, so I was on the floor of Nabisco bakery and Costco. I loved this job! I learned about Dough Jams and loading cocoa into giant vats. I went home smelling like Ritz crackers!

I had interesting jobs in Hospice and ran a chronic pain clinic for a while in Pennsylvania. I also was administer of MacDonald residence, down the street, for a short time after it opened.

P: Do you see any differences between the folks you’ve served in the past and your clients at OTC?

A: It’s all the same to me. I like working one-on one, sometimes I like classes but my favorite is one-on –one. In so many ways everyone is the same and everyone is different.

P: Any stand-out moments during your time here?

A: Many of our people here, as I’ve said, have been through a lot. I often feel a strong connection, great affection, and enormous respect for those I meet here. Dealing with problems and aging is not, as it is said, for the faint of heart! It takes courage sometimes just to get up in the morning and I’ve found many of the people at OTC are courageous.

P: When folks ask, what do you tell them about your experience here?

A: I usually start out and say that I feel really lucky to be a part of this organization. I was lucky to meet up with Geoff, and lucky to have a role here.

P: Anything else you were hoping to be asked about your work or about physical therapy in general?

A: As I said, it’s really a good thing. After all this time, I am not diminished in my enthusiasm at all about where PT is going now. It is becoming more holistic, and with the Alexander Technique that I am bring into this, I focus on those kinds of principles. I also want to say something about the values of OTC. I observe how clients are treated, what happens here, and I think it is exemplary. It is something that should be a model. I am really delighted to be a part of that.

P: What qualities do you see that you would hold up as a model?

A: Enormous respect and empathy. And then kindness, just being kind. Being warm and kind and meeting people where they are. Less judgement, more empathy. I believe that in a more conventional setting, people would not be doing as well as they do here. The programs that are being offered, along with the idea of reducing opioid use and supporting a healthier lifestyle, give people a sense that they are cared for. It is very positive.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: September 2018 Edition

Sep 29, 2018

This month’s volunteer spotlight focuses on a volunteer with the Living Room program at the Old Town Recovery Center (OTRC). The Living Room is a shared, safe place for OTRC members, many of whom are actively living with and managing behavioral and mental health challenges. The Living Room functions as an empowering healing center, a place for members to come and hang out, eat, volunteer, build a community, and participate in regular group activities.

Lisa has been a dedicated volunteer at the Living Room and shares her story as part of National Recovery Month. Read on to hear how Lisa’s recovery informs her service at the Living Room and why peer representation is such an important piece of recovery.

• • •

What is your name and volunteer position?
My name is Lisa and I am a volunteer in the Living Room.

How long have you been volunteering with the Living Room? 
I think it was April, so about five months ago.

How did you find out about the opportunity? 
I just was online looking for volunteer opportunities and I read a description and I really loved the idea of this community environment for people with mental health and/or addiction issues, and the vibe of everyone being equal.

"A lot of people will ask me, 'Oh, do you work here?' or 'Are you going to school?' and I’ll say, 'No, I just like being here. I really want to be around you.'"

And have you seen the community environment and structure of equality in practice during your volunteering? 
Absolutely, yes. Everybody is here to support each other. I feel like the staff treats everyone that walks through the front door like family. It’s really lovely actually and helpful to me.

I have a history of my own mental illness diagnoses and as well as alcoholism and I was very involved in recovery for a long time, and then I had a relapse for about a year and I think that there is a definite connection between my current sobriety and volunteering.

Do see you role as a peer as important to your work in the Living Room? 
Yes, I feel like no matter what our outside life circumstances are, people with mental health struggles and addiction struggles speak the same language. Nothing really compares to that when it comes to feeling a part of a community and even the people who may or may not have the exact same situation for themselves, they understand in one way or another, either through family or other experiences that they’ve had. I feel at home here and I think that’s just because mental health is such a focus here. I come here and I get a lot out of it.

What do you think the importance of a peer is in recovery? 
It’s almost everything. If you don’t have anyone to relate to, you feel alone. I think it’s really important for the Living Room to have volunteers too. A lot of people will ask me, “Oh, do you work here?” or “Are you going to school?” and I’ll say, “No, I just like being here. I really want to be around you.” People that come in will say thank you and I’ll say, “Thank you for being here. I’m getting just as much from this as you are.”

"Everything happens here... all of it."

Have there been any stand out moments at the Living Room during your time as a volunteer? 
There’s so many, every time I’m here. Just washing dishes with someone and chatting about life is great. I find I have so much in common with people that I didn’t realize I would. And it’s not always about addiction or mental health, it’s just as people. And I’ve really enjoyed doing little craft projects here and there and seeing a smile on someone’s face from having a flower in their hair. It goes all the way from serious to something fun. Everything happens here... all of it.

And, our customary last question: What would you say to someone who was interested in volunteering but was on the fence?
I would say that you must be thinking about it for a reason, so it’s in your heart to do it and you can give it a shot. There’s a lot of opportunities here, so I think there’s something for everyone.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: August 2018 Edition

Aug 29, 2018

For this week's volunteer spotlight, we're turning to a volunteer who has already appeared twice before in our spotlights, but never as the sole featured volunteer. Given her dedicated service (Judy was one of thirteen volunteers to give more than 100 hours of service in 2017) we thought it was high time she got her own entry.

Judy is one of several volunteers who serve at the Old Town Clinic as a clinic concierge. The role was designed to help promote the clinic as a welcoming, inclusive place, where the first person you would encounter would be someone who is smiling and asking how you day is going. Judy exemplifies this role to a 'T.' In addition to the warmth she bringing to her conversations with people, where almost every sentence is punctuated with a smile and a laugh, Judy also brings experience into her interactions with patients at the clinic. Read on to see how volunteering helps her connect with her community and about the moments that have made the role particularly special for her.

• • •

While Judy's career has spanned from community development to paleontology (really!), a deep personal connection brought her to volunteer with CCC.What is your name and volunteer position?
My name is Judy Sanders and I volunteer as a concierge at the Old Town Clinic.

How long have you been volunteering with CCC?
I’ve been here probably not quite a year-and-a-half yet. It was a year in the spring.

How did you find out about this opportunity and/or CCC?
Well, I knew about CCC because one of my sons was a client of CCC’s for a number of years. When I moved back to Portland after I retired for real—I retired once and went off and worked for ten more years—I wanted to do volunteer work. As you get older, you kind of start to question if you’re earning your place to still be around, so I needed something to do to make me feel like I had some function left in the world. So, I just called up and asked if you had volunteers.

Had you worked in a clinic before?
No, I had never done anything in health care before, but I had worked with people a lot. I did community development work for 20 years for the City of Portland, so I was used to working with all kinds of people. I was actually in charge of regulatory compliance, so I have come out and monitored CCC a couple of times over the years!

And your “other job” was in…?
Dinosaur paleontology. I did that for ten years while I still had a day job, then when I retired from the City my mentor said, “Come and work for me,” so then I worked in paleo full time for ten years.

“People sometimes come up and thank me for being there, but for me it’s like 'thank you' for letting me come because it’s some of the best fun I have all week."

Do you find that those jobs inform your work as a concierge?
Well, I’ve worked with all kinds of people, and I did oversee some projects in the city serving people experiencing homelessness. But probably more than anything it was my son, because he was homeless for some time and he had alcohol and drug addiction. One of the things that I remember he used to say—that I utilize here—is that he would talk about how he just wanted to feel like a regular person. He hated that everywhere he went he was a patient or a client and he just sometimes wanted to feel like everybody else. So, when I talk to people at the clinic we talk about all sorts of things.

And some people do want to talk about [their medical stuff] and that’s fine, but I do try to find something to talk to people about other than the fact that they’re sick or injured.

Since you’ve been here for a while, do you find that patients are recognizing you when they come in?
Yeah, a lot of them that come in regularly know who I am and I know more or less who they are. I was talking to [an acupuncture client] today and he was saying that it made him feel good to have someone there to talk to and I said, “Yeah, it makes me feel good to see you guys.” I think it’s nice for people to see someone who is familiar; I think it makes them more comfortable. But I think for a lot of people it’s just having someone smile and say hi, notice them. And for me it’s great. People sometimes come up and thank me for being there, but for me it’s like thank you for letting me come because it’s some of the best fun I have all week.

Have there been any stand out moments in your time so far?
One was just a younger fellow who reminds me some of my son, and this fellow is in and out of sobriety, and when he was in sobriety last he was staying with his mother and she would come with him [to appointments]. While he was in his appointment, I just sat with his mother and talked to her and she told me what she was going through and I shared a little of what I went through with my son and kind of said, “It’s okay to feel this way. I did too.”

And so I think it helped her to have someone to talk about it with, because I know when I was going through that with my son, you just don’t feel comfortable talking to people who haven’t experienced it because you feel like they can’t understand and they tend to judge and tend to think you did something bad and weren’t a good mother. So, it was nice to be able to be there for somebody else who needed to say what they had to say and not feel that someone was going to judge them or judge him.

“...it was nice to be able to be there for somebody else who needed to say what they had to say and not feel that someone was going to judge them or judge him."

There are also a couple people who are deaf that come and there’s one lady who’s really good at reading lips, but I decided, “I’m going to learn a little bit of sign language.” I just learned to say a few things and I was so proud of myself when she came in the first time and I signed to her and she perked up. And then there were two other ladies that came in later and they saw me talking to her and they came running over, because they were deaf as well, and said, “You sign?” And then they gave me some flashcards with the alphabet, because I always have trouble with some of the letters, so now those two ladies come in and we chat a little.

And what keeps you coming back to volunteer, now that you’ve done a year-and-a-half?
For me personally, one thing is just that I do need to be out and doing things, I need to feel like I’m still productive in life. But particularly now that I’ve been here a while and know some staff and a lot of the clients, I miss them if I don’t come. I wonder if they were there and if they were okay.

Usually my last question is what would you tell folks who were interested in volunteering, but since you host so many prospective volunteers who are shadowing the concierge role, I wonder if there’s something that you tell them about the role to win them over?
For one thing, I just tell people how much I enjoy it and just what a good time I have! I just find it really rewarding and if I have the chance to spend time with someone that you know really needed somebody to talk to, it just makes you feel good. I would always, with my son, hope that when he wasn’t around, there would be somebody that would be there to be nice to him. So, hopefully I’m doing that for other mothers who can’t do that for their kids.

Was there anything else you were hoping to tell us?
I think one of the things I like about having people come and shadow, particularly ones who haven’t really had much experience with [this population], is that I think it’s really important that as many people as possible get to be involved with all different parts of the community. The people that come to the clinic, they’re not any different than anybody else. They have the same issues and problems and I find, in life, that over the years people just live in their little box and you only meet people like you and it makes all the other people around in the world seem different. It’s not until you get to know people, and whether its people from other counties or life experiences, you just don’t understand that there is actually so little difference. So, I really like the fact that people are willing to come and try it out.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: July 2018 Edition

Jul 30, 2018

For this month, we’re doing a special spotlight to share about a great event that took place this month and how our volunteers have been a part of the changes that have happened at Central City Concern (CCC).

On a balmy summer evening, CCC’s volunteers gathered at the Old Town Recovery Center for a special volunteer re-orientation. This was an opportunity for our currently serving volunteers to get big picture updates about CCC and reminders about policy and procedure. For some of our longest-serving volunteers, it had been more than a decade since their initial orientation, so we had a lot of exciting information to share!

A volunteer attending the re-orientation listens as Sean Hubert, CCC's chief housing and strategy officer, provides a wide-ranging update on the organization's work.

Sean Hubert, CCC's chief housing and strategy officer, gave an engaging presentation about affordable housing and homelessness across the county and how that data is guiding the approach CCC takes in addressing those issues.

Adam Jaffe, CCC’s Privacy and Security Compliance analyst, helped illuminate how regulations like HIPAA protect CCC clients and residents and how volunteers’ work is a part of that effort.

We also asked our volunteers what they had seen change in their time at CCC and what has been meaningful about the time they have spent volunteering.

One long-serving volunteer, who began her service at the Old Town Clinic when it was still a small operation run by Ecumenical Ministries, summed up what she feels has changed over the course of her volunteership with one word: “Everything!”

Other volunteers noted the rapid expansion of staffing at CCC, while others noted how their own sense of commitment and appreciation for CCC’s work had deepened over time.

One long-serving volunteer, who began her service at the Old Town Clinic when it was still a small operation run by Ecumenical Ministries, summed up what had changed succinctly with one word: “Everything!”

And while there was a great variety in the response to what people had seen change at CCC, what they have appreciated about their experience was almost entirely the same across the board. To a person, each volunteer in attendance identified being able to work with CCC’s clients and staff as their favorite part of their experience. They described seeing an agency that is intricate in its structure, but proactive in helping create tangible growth and improvement in people’s lives.

It’s clear that our volunteers, no matter how long they have been with CCC, feel deeply committed to the community that they are a part of and that they serve. We were so grateful to have had this opportunity to share more with them about the goings-on at CCC and to hear their voices as part of those changes.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: June 2018 Edition

Jun 27, 2018

For the last two years, we’ve posted an update around this time of year as to the on-going work of Central City Concern's all-volunteer Art Task Force. In 2016, we shared about the project’s launch and how it has already had a huge impact on our two clinic spaces. Then, in 2017, the results of Phase 2, which included a large expansion of the collection into several other CCC programs.

This year we’re happy to share another update about the group’s work (coming tomorrow), but this year, we also wanted to take the opportunity to highlight the members of the Art Task Force for our monthly volunteer spotlight!

Paul Park, CCC’s communications and events manager, who helps coordinate the Art Task Force’s work, had this to say about the members: ”The amount of time and effort this group of volunteers has put in to opening up the world of healing, high-quality art has been inspiring. Every decision they make about the art they add to the collection always goes back to thinking about the people we serve. The CCC community is deeply fortunate to benefit from the Art Task Force’s dedication.”

We touched base with the members of the group to ask them a few questions about their work and the collection. Read their answers below to find out about favorite pieces in the collection, the history of the task force, and why it matters to have the art in our spaces.

Alice McCartor

"The idea of art as healing resonates with me, having worked in the mental health field during much of my career."

How long have you been serving with the Art Task Force? How did you find out about the opportunity?
I am the newest member, having participated for only one year. I am in awe of the early work of the task force members and am humbled by the artists, gallery owners and private donors who contributed to the first phase of the project that hangs in the downtown health clinic [Old Town Clinic (OTC) and Old Town Recovery Center (OTRC)].

I joined the effort when a friend on the task force asked me if my husband would contribute his art work, which he did. The idea of art as healing resonates with me, having worked in the mental health field during much of my career. I was hooked by the idea and I asked to join. Although I am not well connected to the art world in Portland, I enjoy doing what I can for this work.

What is your favorite piece in the CCC collection and why?
My favorite work of art in the collection is a piece by Rick Bartow. For me, his work comes from the soul.

Pam Baker

"I hope each client finds something in the art that feels good and makes them smile."

How long have you been serving with the Art Task Force? How did you find out about the opportunity?
I was invited to join the Art Task Force in early 2013, when it was just getting underway. My good friend, Kathleen Stephenson-Kuhn, who was founding co-chair, recruited me. She and I had worked together on arts advocacy over many years, so she knew of my interest in the visual arts and my relationship with many Pacific Northwest artists.

What is your favorite piece in the CCC collection and why?
Wow! So many favorites! I’m particularly fond of pieces by artists I know, who have shared the backstories of their pieces, their processes, and their passions. I’m extremely proud that the collection includes major works by Katherine Ace, Laura Ross-Paul, and George Johanson, each of which tell stories that CCC’s clients, staff and visitors can interpret and relate to their own experiences—or simply enjoy for the sheer beauty of color and form.

How do you hope the art makes CCC clients feel?
Valued. Important. Worthy of beauty and fine art in their lives. Different pieces will evoke different feelings: peace, calm, excitement, energy, familiarity, curiosity, joy, wonder, love. I hope each client finds something in the art that feels good and makes them smile.

Dan Winter

"It reminds me of the courage that so many CCC clients draw on by using a “blank slate” to improve their lives."

How long have you been serving with the Art Task Force? How did you find out about the opportunity?
I was fortunate to be the founding co-chair of the Art Task Force, serving for three or four years alongside Kathleen Stephenson-Kuhn as my co-chair.

In 2011, not long after re-locating to Portland from Kansas City, I heard of the great work being done by CCC. Several months later, I attended CCC’s fall luncheon, where I introduced myself to Kristie Perry, who is now CCC’s Director of Donor Relations. It was she who first talked with me about starting the Task Force.

What is your favorite piece in the CCC collection and why?
A favorite work of mine is in Phase 1 of the collection and is hanging in the OTRC: “Untitled (Notebook Paper)” which is by the Icelandic textile artist Hildur Bjarnadottir, who lived and worked in Portland in the early 2000s. It was donated by a very generous, anonymous donor.

It’s unexpected, visually delightful and slightly mysterious. It represents the possibility of “turning over a new leaf” and “starting from scratch.” It reminds me of the courage that so many CCC clients draw on by using a “blank slate” to improve their lives.

How do you hope the art makes CCC clients feel?
Numerous pieces of research indicate that art, when displayed in a healing environment, can inspire people to see the possibilities that occur when healing happens. Imaginations are sparked, attitudes can be adjusted and hope can be found.

Marcy Schwartz

"This was a perfect fit for me—an art lover and collector with an opportunity to share my love of art with folks who don’t often get to experience original work."

How long have you been serving with the Art Task Force? How did you find out about the opportunity?
I’ve been part of the “second wave” of task force members. A longtime friend, Linda Girard, has served on the CCC Board of Directors since its inception. From talking with her, I was extremely impressed with the organization’s work and actively looked for a volunteer opportunity. Linda introduced me to Dan who suggested I get involved with the task force. This was a perfect fit for me—an art lover and collector with an opportunity to share my love of art with folks who don’t often get to experience original work.

What is your favorite piece in the CCC collection and why?
One of my favorite pieces in the collection is William Park’s portrait of a friend of his who was homeless—can’t remember the painting’s title. I love Park’s style of painting—using almost abstract marks that come together to create extremely expressive faces. This fellow looks grounded, accepting, but resolute.

How do you hope the art makes CCC clients feel?
I hope the works in the collection provide an opportunity for CCC clients and staff to get out of themselves and experience other places, spaces, emotions, realities presented by the various artists. And to marvel, as I do, at the amazing creativity and talent of the artists to evoke those experiences in so many different forms.

Carole Romm

"I hope that the clients feel that they are worth having this art around them, and that they are inspired by it."

How long have you been serving with the Art Task Force? How did you find out about the opportunity?
I was the public affairs director at CCC when the Old Town Recovery Center was built. As the walls were going up, I could see that there would be many empty walls and thought it would be wonderful to have art for them. I retired from CCC before a solution could be found, but my successor brought together folks to form the Art Task Force and she invited me to join.

What is your favorite piece in the CCC collection and why?
It’s hard to pick one piece as my favorite. There are so many wonderful pieces. There is a Rick Bartow piece in OTC in the second floor waiting room. I love this piece and Rick’s work because of the luminous quality of the work and the way he included animal and spirit images from his Native American roots.

The William Park painting in the waiting room of the clinic [is another favorite]. I believe it’s called “I’m Ready to Talk Now.” I think Bill is a painter’s painter; you can see his love of the paint and the process of painting in his work. He has been painting Fred, the subject of the painting, every Friday for many years. I know many of the clients relate to this painting and think that Fred is homeless, but he’s not. According to Bill, he’s quite a character though.

How do you hope the art makes CCC clients feel?
I hope that the clients feel that they are worth having this art around them, and that they are inspired by it.

Kathleen Stephenson-Kuhn

"I love the vibrant colors, its slightly graphic sensibility, and the reminder that the world is larger than Portland, Oregon."

How long have you been serving with the Art Task Force? How did you find out about the opportunity?
I was introduced to CCC’s former public affairs director. She and Carole shared their ideas about this project. I joined the committee, which at the time included my good friend [and CCC emeritus board member], Bing Sheldon.

What is your favorite piece in the CCC collection and why?
My favorite work is the large and bold work of Betty La Duke titled “Bali: Sunset.” I love the vibrant colors, its slightly graphic sensibility, and the reminder that the world is larger than Portland, Oregon and that people and animals all share our earth of sun, sky and water.

How do you hope the art makes CCC clients feel?
I hope that the clients and staff get great joy from the art at CCC. I hope the art makes them rethink their assumptions about the world and how they fit. I hope it makes them want to dance and sing!



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: May 2018 Edition

May 29, 2018

For this month’s volunteer spotlight we sat down with Danielle Wheeler, a volunteer with the Recuperative Care Program (RCP), to talk about her work.

RCP provides immediate housing, intensive case management and access to primary care at our Old Town Clinic. Once clients are stable, they can focus on rebuilding their lives. Central City Concern specialists can help them get supportive housing, training, employment and the resources they need to recover and to become self-sufficient.

Jordan Wilhelms, RCP's program manager, had this to say about the role Danielle, our spotlighted volunteer, plays:

“Danielle has been an amazing volunteer for RCP. She has embodied the RCP spirit of service, has tirelessly and consistently worked to improve our systems, relieve our staff from burden where possible, and brought her organizational and housing expertise to RCP’s capacity to provide skilled interventions for our participants!”

Annie Demotta, RCP's housing specialist added, “Danielle is someone with an incredible skill set, with high standards, who also leads with her heart. On behalf of myself, the RCP team and the people we serve, we are so lucky to have her here!”

Read on to hear how Danielle got connected with CCC, why the team keeps her coming back to volunteer, and why housing is such a crucial part of recuperative care.

• • •

PeterAs CCC's Recuperative Care Program housing specialist volunteer, Danielle has become a key member of the team and a compassionate ear for clients.: What is your name and volunteer position?

Danielle: My name is Danielle Wheeler and my volunteer position is housing specialist.

P: How did you get hooked up with RCP and CCC?

D: This is a really cool story actually. So three years ago I left my career job to stay home with my kids and I wanted to spend a little more time volunteering while my kids were in school. For many years I’d been involved through my church in a monthly serving of meals at Bud Clark Commons through Transition Projects (TPI), so I called them up and they threw me into a role to teach how subsidized housing works.

P: Do you have a background in subsidized housing?

D: I don’t. I have an MBA and my background is in marketing. A case manager who was doing those classes trained me and then he went back into his case management role, so I continued on [teaching the classes]. It was really great and it gave me the hands-on work that I really wanted to do.

So I did that for a couple years, and one day I met a woman who was struggling with her housing plan and understanding the housing market and I finally referred her to her case manager and she said, “Well, I don’t have a case manager here, I’m at RCP” and I said, “What’s RCP?”

I was introduced to [RCP staffer] Annie Demotta and through that, because this woman was just not understanding who was who and where everybody came together, learned about the RCP program and I was hooked. Annie invited me in to take a look around and see if I wanted to get involved, so I slowly started balancing that into my workload.

"So often I will hear clients articulate that because of transient living circumstances... that their medical condition is more complicated than it would be if they had their own home, their own space, their own quiet."
-Danielle, CCC Volunteer

P: What did you find so interesting about RCP?

D: I have a real passion for working with the most vulnerable, and RCP has a very high percentage of those who need a lot more supportive care across the board, not just in housing. So housing is where I spend most of my time, but housing is just one piece of people being able to achieve whatever goals they have for themselves.

I’ve worked at Intel, I’ve worked at Microsoft, I’ve worked at other large well-known organizations, and I have never seen a team that functions so well and with a lot of diversity on the team as well. There’s a lot of respect here and I think the vast majority of clients that come through RCP really feel this is their journey and that we are not dictating to them. We are here to support them, hear their goals, and then provide them pathways to that and then encourage them along the way. I really hear that come out in the clients.

And yet these are some of the most vulnerable people. They have not only had some hard luck along the way, not had family support, whatever it might be that has lead them to the situation; now they have medical conditions on top of that and so for me it just really grabs my heart to be able to be a part of a team that is there to support them in moving along their path.

P: And what specifically are you doing with the program? Has it changed since volunteering at TPI?

D: It’s broadened. At TPI I was more focused on subsidized housing, but housing can often be much more than that. To address somebody’s subsidized housing plan, you really have to understand who they are, what their overall goals are, and it’s usually a multi-step process. It’s rare that somebody can just go out and get a job and get an apartment. It does happen, but sometimes there needs to be some other pieces along the way.

So what I like about my role here is it’s all-encompassing. It’s “sit down, hear where they want to go with housing, and then start to fill in the pieces;” sometimes that’s subsidized housing, sometimes it’s not. Through Annie and through the team, I’ve learned about and continued to learn about so many different housing options that exist out there.

P: And what are the main challenges in that work of trying to help secure housing for people?

D: I think, simply put, it’s that there aren’t enough options for people. I think that there are a lot of great programs out there and I think that there’s a lot of energy trying to coordinate across those programs. However, they are still disparate and understanding what is what, I think of it as a big puzzle. Each person gets to define what pieces they want to put in that puzzle and there is no guidebook for that.

"I’ve worked at Intel, I’ve worked at Microsoft,  I've worked at other large well-known organizations, and I have never seen a team that functions so well..."

P: And the fact that you’re dealing with people who may have been chronically homeless over decades and dealing with complex medical issues, I’d imagine the process can be really overwhelming for folks.

D: Yeah, it really depends. There are some who are ready, whether that’s due to a new illness that has complicated something, a recent arrest that has been the final straw for them, some people come really ready to change things. But for most, it is a challenge to build trust, and not with the staff here, I see that happen more quickly than I’ve seen with any other program, but rather trust in the process and that “the system” won’t let them down. It’s not uncommon that until somebody has the keys in their hand they don’t really believe it’s going to happen. So sometime we get lack of engagement because of that, which is heartbreaking.

It’s hard to get to the core of why they don’t trust. And it might just be that they are not ready for that, it’s not their time yet. And that’s okay too. One of the great things about RCP is that the staff here are very respectful of [that]. It’s not about us imposing on them, for example, that they must be housed. If somebody is not comfortable with that, for whatever reason, we can offer them support in maybe exploring that, but if that’s not what they want that’s okay too. It’s client-led here and I think that’s a big difference.

P: And despite the fact that being housed is a part of the RCP program, it’s technically a health services program. Why do we have a housing department in a health services program?

D: So often I will hear clients articulate that because of transient living circumstances (or whatever has been going on in their housing background that is not stable) that their medical condition is more complicated than it would be if they had their own home, their own space, their own quiet. So, many people recognize that and recognize that housing is a part of their care plan, medically speaking.

P: So it’s giving that baseline to be able to build on the rest of that plan?

D: It’s a piece of the plan. RCP has a very holistic view. People come in here for medical reasons, but then we’re humanizing their experience and we’re saying you know we’re not just here to get you to your doctor’s appointment. We’re here to listen to you and hear what your goals are when you leave and see if we can’t support and connect you during your time here to helping you on your pathway to those goals. And more often than not, housing is a piece of that: “If I only had my own space and quiet I could heal better” or “I could sleep better and then I could go back to work.” So housing becomes a core piece for most people.

P: Have there been any standout experiences during your time here?

D: There have definitely been some clients who came through here that’ve touched my heart and have gotten housed and been so grateful and there have been some beautiful moments that way. But I think the moment that touched me the most was actually an internal one with the team.

There had been an incident in the building that had potentially put some of our staff in harm’s way. What really touched me was that this team’s management intentionally took the time to sit the team down, debrief, and make sure that people felt heard. Emotions were encouraged and shared. I had mentioned this was a high-functioning team, but in that moment I saw why. The management of this team was incredible in the way that they allowed that to unfold and the team to come together, and that translates into better services for our clients. Not just because of the skill set (should there be another potentially dangerous situation), but just for being more present and aware as a team for every client that comes through here.

P: And, our traditional last question, what would you say to someone who was curious about volunteering with CCC but was on the fence?

D: I do get asked a lot by people who are interested. Homelessness is such a big topic in Portland and so lots of people ask me how they can get involved. Having seen only a slice of CCC, but hearing about how the medical services, for example, fit in, or the bigger housing pieces fit in, I am so impressed with CCC’s offerings across different ways to serve somebody. CCC’s big enough where anybody who wants to get involved in homelessness, whatever that means to them and wherever their passions are, can figure out [a role] where they are comfortable and still contribute to the organization.



Central City Concern Celebrates National Volunteer Week 2018!

Apr 16, 2018

It’s that time again (arguably the best time of the year), National Volunteer Week! This is always an exciting time for us at Central City Concern, as we have so many people who give their time in so many different, but equally wonderful ways. Even a week doesn’t feel long enough to begin to illuminate all the amazing things our volunteer base helps us do, but we’re excited to share this year’s stories.

For the first blog post of the Volunteer Week series, Volunteer Manager Peter Russell shares some thoughts about how we can give back to our communities and how we are highlighting our volunteers’ work this year by focusing on the people they serve.

• • •

CCC Volunteer Manager Peter Russell shares that every volunteer role plays a part in improving our community.“I’d like to help, but I don’t know how!”

This is something I hear often when sitting down with prospective volunteers or talking with people about volunteership in general. For some people, that comes from not knowing what the available roles are, or not having had the time to volunteer previously, but I think part of it comes from the feeling that the need is so large that one person couldn’t possibly make a difference.

It’s so easy to imagine service to be something grand or dramatic. A group of fifty people banding together to go out and help finish a large project in a day or working to create a new program that will address an unmet need in our community. To be certain, this kind of work can be hugely important and necessary, but I want to challenge the idea that this is the ultimate way to give back.

In honor of this year’s National Volunteer Week, we’re calling back to some of the volunteer spotlights from the past year and showing the other side of the story. The people who have been touched by the work of those dedicated volunteers. It’s important to remember that at the end of the day—whether you’re volunteering to advocate for policy change or to hold space for others—the end result is lifting people, and thereby our community, up.

Our volunteers bring in anything from a special skill that they want to pass along to others or just a warm presence. And from a quantifiable standpoint, the fact that the average volunteer at CCC stays for almost twice as long our minimum service requirement shows that the work is just as meaningful for them as it is for us.

...at the end of the day—whether you’re volunteering to advocate for policy change or to hold space for others—the end result is lifting people, and thereby our community, up.

Most of the volunteers that we have featured in our Monthly Volunteer Spotlights give, on average, a couple shifts a month of volunteer service, but what is clear is that they have all had a tremendous impact on the people we serve. They have inspired in those they serve a sense of hope, a path toward recovery and strength, and a way for people to feel like they have a home of their own. And they have done it all one day at a time, one person at a time.

So, if in reading this week’s blogs you find yourself thinking, “I’d like to give back, but I don’t know how,” consider whether you have four hours a month or a week that you could give to a cause that matters to you. Your presence will make a difference. As one of our interview subjects said, what matters most to her is that people keep coming back.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: March 2018 Edition

Mar 27, 2018

For the month of March, we wanted to turn our spotlight on an important, if little seen, part of our organization. Central City Concern’s board of directors is comprised of an all-star line-up of community figures and subject matter experts, but when the board needs to hone in on a particular part of CCC’s work, they sometimes turn to the board committees, which are specialty groups that are made up of board members, and other volunteers with a particular expertise.

For this month’s spotlight, we sat down with one of the members of the board’s Audit and Compliance committee, Shirley Cyr, to hear about the work she does. While Shirley herself is quick to divert any praise directed at her to others, a couple of her colleagues at CCC jumped at the opportunity to share their appreciation for her work. EV Armitage, CCC’s executive coordinator, said Shirley “is a dedicated committee member. Her expertise in the very specific and complex area of nonprofit audits has been really helpful for CCC, and she is able to address valuable questions and comments about our audits.”

Sarah Chisholm, CCC’s current chief financial officer, added, “we’re delighted to have Shirley serve on the committee because of her passion for serving the nonprofit sector and her technical accounting knowledge. She provides an important function, which is ensuring our annual financial audit has the appropriate checks and balances.”

Read on to hear about how Shirley’s work helps CCC “be good” and the changes she has seen in her 10 years of service.

• • •

Shirley Cyr has been volunteering on CCC's Audit and Compliance board committee for nearly 10 years.Peter: What is your name and volunteer role?

Shirley: My name is Shirley Cyr and I am part of the Audit and Compliance board committee within Central City Concern.

P: And how long have you been on the Audit Committee?

S: I have no idea! I think it’s been since 2007 or 2008. I was asked to participate by David Altman, who was CCC’s CFO at the time. So I’ve just stayed involved. He moved on long ago, but I’m still there.

David, when he came in, felt that the organization needed to put some procedures in place and formed the audit committee, since there hadn’t been one before. Besides being responsible for the financial statements and the audits, we also review the compliance audits which are done internally. It’s a lot more than I initially thought it was, as far as the oversight, but it’s been interesting.

P: Has it been exciting to be able to shape things through the committee’s work?

S: We’re more of an oversight committee and provide guidance, but it does play a significant role for the organization even though most people don’t know it’s there.

P: It’s having that second set of eyes and the assurance that comes with that.

S: Yeah. David, when he brought me in, it was because I’m a CPA. So, financial expertise is why I was put on the committee. Looking at the organization’s financial statement, interpreting them, and understanding them, that’s pretty easy for me because that’s what I’ve done for a long time. I worked in public accounting for about nine-and-half-years.

P: Outside of questions about our programs, I think the question I get the most often about CCC is, “How are you funded?”

S: A lot of it is governmental funding for the critical services CCC provides, so there’s a lot of compliance involved with that. You don’t get to continue the work if you don’t do a good job, so compliance is critical to the organization. Many agencies come in and audit the organization and look at the record keeping; if it’s not right, you get shut down. So, it’s got to be good.

P: What has your experience been with seeing CCC change over the last ten years?

S: It’s been a lot of growth: added housing, added services, and the ability to serve more. It’s been incredible to watch that growth. Sometimes you get a little bit frightened that growth has been too fast, but it’s been handled well. There’s always a little bit of upheaval with growth and it can take a little while to settle in sometimes, but I think it’s been handled very well. The staff I’ve gotten to work with are incredible.

"There’s always a little bit of upheaval with growth and it can take a little while to settle in sometimes, but I think it’s been handled very well. The staff I’ve gotten to work with are incredible."
-Shirley Cyr, CCC Volunteer

P: Has there been a particular project or part of that that you got to work on that was particularly meaningful for you?

S: The compliance aspect, just so far as overall compliance, I think that’s been fascinating for me.

P: What’s been the most fascinating thing to learn more about?

S: Last week when we had our meeting it was a lot about the staffing, looking at the female-to-male workforce percentages in different departments, so you want to try and get some diversity within genders, but also different ethnicities. CCC has done a very good job in bringing in a good blend of people that reflect the community that they work in, and that’s what’s really critical.

Part of this is because CCC hires so many people that have been clients of the organization. In my company, we look at trying to improve the workforce, and to help people out that are previously disadvantaged into getting jobs and good jobs. You guys do it every day of the week. It’s something that we strive to do more of, and we try and try and try, and we do the best we can, but you guys are actually able to do it. I’m pretty impressed with that. We didn’t get to keep the report after the meeting, but I would love to mirror it, because I love to plagiarize, so to speak, when I can, with ideas and formats and such.

P: That’s sort of the broader benefit of bringing people such as yourself to these oversight committees, is that you can take inspiration from us, but we can also be inspired by your experience and different lenses.

S: I think the lenses are probably the important part. You get different ideas from different people or sometimes you just want to knock an idea around. When you’re in accounting or the CPA world you are in an entity pretty much by yourself, so you’re a sounding board of one, which is hard. So sometimes it helps to have others around to do that.

"Every once in a while I’ll look at my commitments and say, 'Okay continue or don’t continue.' And this one I haven’t given up and I don’t think I will."

P: That’s a lesson I’m still learning in my own career, which is that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel every time.

S: Well, it’s like, “Have you got this kind of policy?” And they’ll say, “Oh yeah, sure, here you go!” And that’s how policies are developed, so a lot of them will look the same because they come from the same source. That’s how I’ve done things forever, I’ll go online to find things. Thankfully we have the internet!

P: If someone was interested in volunteering with a committee, but they were on the fence, what would you tell them?

S: It’s a great organization that accomplishes good works. It feels good to be a part of the organization in some small way, because it does impact change.

Every once in a while I’ll look at my commitments and say, “Okay continue or don’t continue.” And this one I haven’t given up and I don’t think I will.