Rooted in Community: Old Town Clinic

Aug 05, 2019

For 40 years, Central City Concern (CCC) has been caring for people in Portland who are impacted by homelessness. In the late 1970s, we offered recovery treatment with housing, which was a new but logical approach: it’s easier for people to get better if they have a place to live. This was the beginning of CCC’s deep roots in the Portland community that expanded through the decades with new ideas and innovations in response to evolving patient needs.

By the early 80s, Old Town was only a few years removed from the height of living up to its “Skid Row” reputation. Thankfully, agencies were beginning to make headway toward helping people into better, more stable situations. For example, Burnside Consortium (as CCC was then known) sprouted up a few years earlier to save and increase the safety and maintenance of the single room occupancy (SRO) housing stock in the neighborhood and to fund local alcohol treatment providers. In 1983, Old Town Clinic (OTC), a small medical but sorely needed facility run by the Burnside Community Council, opened in neighborhood fixture Baloney Joe’s, a shelter serving homeless people located at the east end of the Burnside Bridge.

OTC moved to W Burnside and Third Ave in 1985; the next year Ecumenical Ministries took over management and continued to run the facility, providing primary care to the neighborhood’s homeless population for the next 15 years.

In 1983, Old Town Clinic (OTC), a small medical but sorely needed facility run by the Burnside Community Council, opened in neighborhood fixture Baloney Joe’s, a shelter serving homeless people located at the east end of the Burnside Bridge.

By 2001, CCC had recognized just how important health care is for helping people to realize their full potential; we took over management of the clinic. A decade of running CCC’s Portland Addictions Acupuncture Clinic (later renamed the Portland Alternative Health Center), which provided acupuncture, naturopathic and light primary care services to those living in and around Old Town, demonstrated the importance of comprehensive care to the success of long-term recovery. Assuming OTC’s operations solidified our commitment to providing holistic care. We quickly expanded the clinic’s services while continuing to operate in a low-cost setting. OTC began to offer both primary and naturopathic care, preventive exams, injury treatment, and connections to mental health and substance use disorder services. The clinic became a crucial starting point to help many patients end their homelessness and began a path to better health. 

Gary Cobb, CCC community outreach coordinator who has been with the agency since 2001, remembers how things fell in to place for the Old Town Clinic, as if it was all meant to be. “Sometimes you can’t sit and wait for opportunities to arise,” he said. “You need to jump and make things happen.”

At first, OTC operated under Multnomah County’s Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) status. But in 2003, CCC became its own FQHC site. This new designation allowed CCC to receive federal reimbursement for uninsured and underinsured poverty-level clients, opening up opportunities to bring much-needed medical services to our other programs like Hooper Detoxification Stabilization Center, Letty Owings Center and the Community Engagement Program. (CCC now has 13 FQHC sites.)

“Sometimes you can’t sit and wait for opportunities to arise. You need to jump and make things happen.”

In 2003, OTC moved temporarily to NW 5th Ave. and Everett for about a year. But in 2004, CCC opened a shiny new building on W Burnside and Broadway where OTC and PAHC essentially consolidated into a single program to offer both primary care and complementary medicine services under the same roof. Old Town Clinic and our pharmacy continue to thrive there today. “We had leadership who had been community organizers, so their expertise in building relationships made the clinic into the national model it is today,” said Cobb.

OTC began a partnership with Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in 2006. This partnership placed volunteer OHSU resident physicians in safety net clinics where they are trained by CCC staff to meet the medical needs of Portland’s homeless and low-income community. This “social medicine” partnership was a mutually beneficial one that allowed CCC to expand its medical services while training a future physician workforce to be familiar with and responsive to the needs of safety net clinics’ patient populations.

When Oregon began its statewide health system transformation to coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and expanded Medicaid coverage, CCC jumped on board to help achieve the triple aim of better care, better health and lower costs for all Oregonians. In 2012, CCC joined 10 other local health care and social service organizations to become a founding member of Health Share of Oregon CCO, which serves Medicaid members in Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties.

In 2013, OTC was one of a handful of clinics nationwide singled out by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as an “exemplar practice” for our innovative work making health care more accessible to patients. The clinic hosts many innovative teams and programs, such as the Summit team that treats medically complex and fragile patients with integrated flexible care.

Being part of an organization that also provides affordable, supportive housing also gives OTC an unprecedented opportunity to serve its surrounding community. With some ingenuity, CCC’s Housed and Healthy program breaks down walls to lower barriers to quality care for hundreds of area residents.

Being part of an organization that also provides affordable, supportive housing also gives OTC an unprecedented opportunity to serve its surrounding community.

OTC and its pharmacy recently began using highly effective drugs to treat hepatitis C, a serious chronic liver disease that can lead to cirrhosis, cancer and even death. Oregon’s rate of hepatitis C is one of the highest in the country, and people with substance use disorders experience higher rates of hepatitis C. In 2018, OTC treated and cured 107 people who were infected with the hepatitis C virus, giving them a much healthier and brighter future. This treatment program continues to save lives.

Through OTC has hopped around the neighborhood and changed management over the past 36 years, one thing has always been constant: caring for the community that needs us the most. We respond to challenges with new ideas, and grow stronger with change. And we welcome and honor the people who entrust us with their health; they are the reason we’re here.



CCC Celebrates the Grand Opening of Blackburn Center!

Jul 16, 2019

On the afternoon of Tuesday, July 9, Central City Concern (CCC) welcomed nearly 300 community partners, funders and friends of the organization into our Blackburn Center in East Portland for a grand opening event.

The day marked a celebration of the building's completion, the start of services, the incredible breadth of partners and funders who made this possible, the impact Blackburn Center will make on the lives of thousands of people, and the tremendous amount of work that has gone into the project. Blackburn Center is the final and flagship project of the Housing is Health initiative.

As CCC's President and CEO Dr. Rachel Solotaroff reminded the guests, everything about Blackburn Center points back to the people we serve. "This beautiful space is a testament to the dignity and potential each person we serve holds, with an elegant and elevating environment to prove it," she said.

Blackburn Center is located at the corner of E Burnside and 122nd Ave.      CCC President & CEO Dr. Rachel Solotaroff opened the program.

Julie Smith, an apprentice laborer who worked on the building for Walsh Construction, shared her story, revealing that she had herself received CCC's services to find the path of recovery and stability. Working on the building that would serve thousands of people on similar paths as her own was so meaningful, she said.

Ed Blackburn, CCC's president & CEO emeritus after whom the building is named, reflected on what the services we offer here will mean to those we serve. Pain and hurt would enter through our doors, yes, but healing and hope would be shared back out into the world.

Other speakers included Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, Metro Councilor Shirley Craddick, and representatives from funders Portland Housing Bureau, Corporation for Supportive Housing, U.S. Bank, Oregon Housing and Community Services, Oregon Health Authority and the Hazelwood Neighborhood Association.

Representatives from each of the six Housing is Health initiative partners, who came together to provide a trailblazing $21.5 million gift to fund Blackburn Center and two other affordable housing projects, spoke as well: Adventist Health Medical Group, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, Oregon Health & Science University and Providence Health & Services - Oregon.

Julie Smith spoke about CCC's recovery and housing services crucial to helping her find stability. She was the event's honorary ribbon cutter.      Ed Blackburn, CCC president & CEO emeritus, was instrumental in bringing the six Housing is Health partners together under a common cause.

The first two floors of Blackburn Center are a community health center that will eventually serve 3,000 people each year with comprehensive and integrated primary care services, mental health and addiction treatment care, employment assistance, housing resources and a pharmacy.

The third floor is the new home of CCC’s Recuperative Care Program (RCP). Since 2005, RCP has offered respite care to 30 people at a time, offering medical care, case management and housing to people discharged from local hospitals with nowhere else to go and heal. With their move to Blackburn Center, RCP can now care for up to 51 people. Mental Health RCP will start in the next month, while 10 beds for people in palliative care will be added in the future.

Blackburn Center also includes 80 units of alcohol- and drug-free transitional housing on the fourth and fifth floors, and 34 permanent homes on the sixth floor. Integrated resident and health support services will help residents stay housed and in recovery.

Ankrom Moisan Architects, Inc. did an award-winning job on the design of the building; Walsh Construction Co. brought it into touchable, walkable, livable reality.

Thanks to all who joined in our journey to open Blackburn Center. And now we get to the real work of helping people find home, healing and hope.

Learn more about Blackburn Center’s services here. View the complete set of photos from the event here.

     

     



The 2017 Sandy Anderson Award Winner: Way More than "just an enforcer"

Dec 20, 2017

During the Old Town Clinic (OTC) all-staff meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 6, Billie Kay Stafford, OTC's operations manager, was recognized with the Health Services Advisory Council’s (HSAC) 2017 Sandy Anderson Award.

Billie Kay, or BK as she's affectionately known across Central City Concern, was an exemplary choice to be this year's awardee. For the last three years, the Sandy Anderson Award has been given by HSAC to a staff person who:

- Is always person-centered in their interactions with consumers.
- Puts the needs and goals of consumers first.
- Listens deeply and sees and hears beyond how people might seem on the surface.
- Is collaborative and solves problems with us instead of for us.
- Keeps long-term care goals in mind while also meeting people where they are.
- Can instill hope, no matter what.

Billie Kay is well-known and much-admired for the excellent job she does keeping OTC a calm and safe environment. If a patient is upset, she deftly intervenes in a way that makes them feel heard and de-escalates them, but also makes it clear what the clinic rules are around behavior to keep OTC a welcoming environment for everyone.

As our Old Town Clinic has grown in the number of patients we serve, the staff we employ, and the services we offer, Billie Kay has been an essential part of improving patient access and the patient experience. Despite the countless moving parts that make OTC what it is, Billie Kay makes sure that the clinic operates as efficiently as possible.

Upon the announcement of her recognition, Billie Kay received a standing ovation from OTC staff. Clearly touched, she said through tears and, as always in her trademark Texas accent, that the award was especially meaningful for her in light of its namesake and past honorees.

"I look at the people that have gotten this and the person it's named after as being people with huge hearts, that everybody respects and loves. I see myself as just the people think of as just the enforcer."

Billie Kay's commitment to centering our clinic's work on the people we serve, her ability to collaborate to solve problems big and small, and her obvious love of our patients ensure that her colleagues certainly see Billie Kay as more than that. "I love my job and I love y'all," she said.

Congratulations, Billie Kay!

Past winners of the Sandy Anderson Award include OTC Care Team Manager Carol Weber in 2015 and Old Town Recovery Center psychiatrist Phil Shapiro in 2016.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: November 2017 Edition

Nov 30, 2017

This month’s spotlight features a volunteer who came aptly qualified for our Cooking Matters program, which is a partnership between Central City Concern and the Oregon Food Bank that teaches clients the skills and knowledge required for healthy cooking and eating habits. Having previously volunteered with a different Cooking Matters session and given her experience in the health care industry, she couldn’t have been a better fit to volunteer with the program! Linda Nguyen, who supervised Nickie in the program, said about her work, “The Cooking Matters team at Old Town Clinic was honored to have Nickie share her time and knowledge with our program. Nickie’s kind, calm, and compassionate spirit helped create a friendly environment where our clients felt safe and supported throughout the 6-weeks program.”

Read on to see why Nickie has continued to volunteer with the Cooking Matters program, and what was so special about the classes at CCC.

• • •

Peter: What is your name and volunteer position?

Nickie: My name is Nickie Dane and I am the Cooking Matters lead assistant.

P: And you had done the Cooking Matters program before coming to CCC, right?

N: Yes, I was a grocery store tour coordinator [with a Cooking Matters program] in North Carolina. People would be referred to this day of tours through the health department or WIC [the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children], and we’d put on like six in one day, so people would come in and go through the grocery store and get a “10 dollar challenge” where they got to practice buying things from the different food groups.

P: And how is this class different than the one you had done before?

N: It’s different in that it’s over a six-week period, while those other ones it was just an afternoon, so they come in and get an hour or two hour tour and that was it. With this there would be follow up and participants would come in and talk about the recipes and what they’d done at home that was a little healthier. It was exciting seeing people make the commitment and keep coming. There were a good eleven people who did the whole class. I just enjoyed people being excited about cooking and health.

"It was exciting seeing people make the commitment and keep coming.... I just enjoyed people being excited about cooking and health."
-Nickie, CCC Volunteer

P: What is it about Cooking Matters that is meaningful for you and kept you coming back to it?

N: I work in the health care industry and seeing the lack of information given to people by traditional primary care providers about what people can do to improve their health as far lifestyle and food choice goes has been a big driver. I think that prevention needs a little more attention and if they haven't gotten it from their doctor then they can get it from other sources, like Cooking Matters.

P: What were the common questions or misconceptions that folks had?

N: So, some of the things that come up are like, “Why do we have to look at saturated fat?” So, we’ll have a conversation about heart disease and they’ll go, “Oh well, I have some heart problems,” or high blood pressure and that will lead us down the conversation of sodium intake and reading food labels. And they never knew they should look at that part of the food label and they didn’t know that sodium affected their blood pressure significantly. Because their doctor might have said, “Oh, try to cut back on salt,” but they didn’t really understand why or get into a conversation any deeper than that.

P: I think we do hear that a lot, just sort of, “You should eat better.”

N: Yeah, just really generic instructions and there’s not a how you should do that, or why you should do that.

P: Is that something that is part of the Cooking Matters program, more than just “you should,” but this is how this affects your body?

N: Yes! And not just that, but understanding how a recipe works and if you don’t have a recipe, how to take the foods you’re getting at the food pantry or what you’re able to purchase at a low price and how to make that into something healthy and also looking at things like leaving the peels on fruits and vegetables, because that gives you more fiber. And fiber is better for you because it helps prevent cancer and lowers you cholesterol, so these are things we all talk about in the class over the six weeks. Lots of questions, lots of “Oh, I didn’t know that!”

P: Were there any common reasons that folks weren’t always able to access healthy food?

N: I think one of the barriers living in this area is access to healthy food, so purposefully going out of your way to go to the bigger grocery stores to buy fresh produce. That is a big barrier, because it’s easy to just go down to that little convenience store that’s right there.

P: I think that’s something we can all relate to, if it’s hard to fit that time in to your week or you don’t have a car or reliable transit, just valuing food enough to make that time to make that trip and that effort.

N: Yes. And seeing that it’s not a huge hurdle. It can be a hurdle, but we took the bus to Fred Meyer so they got to see that it just took a few minutes.

Another thing that would come up is the kitchens that they have available to them. They would say, “Oh, I don’t have this, I don’t have an oven, I only have a microwave or a hotplate.” So we’d talk about different ways to get around that so you could still have the healthy food and the good options and kind of overcoming not having measuring cups, little things that we take for granted.

P: Were there any stand out moments from the class?

N: I loved the last day when everyone got to come together and talk about what they learned and the recipes that they liked and just got to hang out. I think a bunch of people stayed later and we all took pictures and everyone got a little award and an apron and they just talked about how much they loved it and how they want to take more classes.

The last day we also played food jeopardy. Alison [the lead chef for Cooking Matters] set up this Jeopardy board and prizes, like mixing spoons and things like that they could use, and everyone did so well remembering things like what temperature you need to cook chicken to and what’s the biggest way you can prevent disease or foodborne illness, which was “wash your hands,” which everyone knew.

I got to know some people and the hard things they’ve gone through and what they’ve overcome. And now that they’re getting back in to a stable lifestyle this is something where they can meet people and learn a new skill and take their health into their own hands. I think having something to stick with and to get out and meet people and interact with them was really good for several participants. There was a couple in there too and they used it as their date night. And one of them didn’t like vegetables at all, or only certain vegetables, so it kind of pushed him outside of his comfort zone. And that was cool to see.

P: And what was important about this experience for you?

N: Seeing how resilient people are. It was so neat to get to know people over these six weeks and hearing what they’re going through with their health and illness, rough backgrounds, and the social isolation and they’re just putting themselves out there and working to get better. When I work as a paramedic, I talk to someone for about 15 to 30 minutes, and that’s about it, and I leave them at the hospital, so I don’t really get beyond, “What are you feeling right now?” Working with this population, which I don’t get to do very often, it kind of pushed me beyond my comfort zone in effective communications and how to talk about things that are hard without being biased or offending anyone.

P: And what keeps you coming back to volunteer?

N: It feels so good, people thank you, and hopefully I’ll get to see people on the street now walking around in this area and say hi and catch up and make connections.

P: It’s a great reminder that we’re all in this space together and you can make a connection like that.

"It’s nice to just break it down and just understand that while they have a completely different life from what I have, they are valuable, they are human, and want interactions. We’re all people in this community."

N: Just even walking over here, I try to smile at people on the street when I’m walking by and maybe they don’t get attention or noticed or whatever, so just smiling and saying hi and just watching them be like, “Oh, Hi!” It’s nice to just break it down and just understand that while they have a completely different life from what I have, they are valuable, they are human, and want interactions. We’re all people in this community.

P: And for our traditional last questions, if you met someone who was on the fence about volunteering with CCC, other than that wonderful pitch you just gave to me, what would you tell them?

N: Oh, I mean, even if you just do a little bit I think that seeing other ways of life or confronting things that you have a bias toward or against, it just makes you feel more connected to humanity. It makes you feel more human. And more empathetic. That’s a big, big part of why I’m doing this. It’s so important to interact with people that you don’t normally and do something for another person.

• • •

If reading about Nickie and Cooking Matters inspires you to make a donation of items, we are in need of kitchen supplies to help keep the class going at Central City Concern. Our Cooking Matter Amazon Wish List makes it easy for you donate, or you can contact our Donor Relations Manager, Catharine Hunter at catharine.hunter@ccconcern.org if you have quality used materials from the list that you would like to donate.

And if you are interested in learning more about volunteer positions in at Central City Concern’s health and recovery, housing, or employment programs, contact Peter Russell, CCC’s Volunteer Manager, at peter.russell@ccconcern.org or visit our volunteer webpage.



A Room Full of Furry Faces

Nov 28, 2017

The following was written by Bonnie Suba, who provides security at our Old Town Clinic, about Kally Stark, a phlebotomist who serves patients at OTC.

• • •

For a couple of years now, I have been the security officer at the Old Town Clinic. I provide safety and security for both staff and patients, as well as visitors. I complete rounds during closing of regular business hours and meet and greet staff that are finishing up for the day. I usually will come upon some staff members that are committed to finishing the day’s tasks no matter the quitting time. I usually peek my head in the doorway and inquire if everything is okay or anything needed. This brings me to the purpose of me sharing this story.

A few months ago, as I was doing my regular rounds of the clinic, I was checking the second floor and noticed that Kally was still in her lab. Kally is a phlebotomist and works in a small room without windows. I can see Kally from the doorway, but I do not enter the lab because I find that the lab is private, being that blood or bodily fluids are being removed from someone. I find this to be very private in nature and usually an anxiety-filled moment. Therefore, sometimes I just signal her a “thumbs up” and she gives me a “thumbs up” in response, acknowledging that she is fine and soon to be going home.

However, this one day, I decided to step into her laboratory to speak to her. When I stepped into her lab, I was captivated by all the black and white pictures of dogs and cats and a rabbit and possibly a squirrel that lined her walls in the laboratory. I asked Kally where she got all these pictures of these animals. She told me that most of them were photos of her client’s pets. She explained to me that most of the patients come into the lab and are already highly anxious about coming into the clinic and even more so the lab. She shared with me that many clients have little more than their pets. Having pictures of their pets on the walls eases their anxiety and makes the process more personal than clinical for the patient.

She shared with me that many clients have little more than their pets. Having pictures of their pets on the walls eases their anxiety and makes the process more personal than clinical for the patient.

There were 8x10 pictures lining the walls and another wall behind the door where some of the staff’s canines and felines. Kally stood there and told me the names of the pets on the wall and about some of the clients that owned them. I felt a personal touch and peacefulness when Kally was explaining all the pictures and how she wanted her clients to feel less anxious while being in the world in which she works—drawing blood.

While the placing of photos of canines and felines may seem small and insignificant, they have a comforting and enduring impact on the wellbeing of the clients. I truly want to acknowledge that Kally created a therapeutic environment, probably without even knowing it. She has genuinely gone above and beyond her calling in her profession! I applaud you Kally and I am certain that your clients give you a standing ovation!



CCC breaks ground on Blackburn Building that will "bring hope and healing to thousands of people like me"

Nov 07, 2017

CCC President & CEO Rachel Solotaroff, MDMultnomah County District 3 Commissioner Jessica Vega PedersonMetro Councilor Shirley Craddick, District 1
Drew Hammond, Assistant Vice President of Business Development for U.S. BankTricia Tillman, a member of the Oregon Housing and Community Services Housing Stability CouncilMelissa Garcia, National Lending Initiatives Director for the Low Income Investment FundHeather Lyons, Director of the Northwest Region at CSHMike Holevas, a community member who has received services through Central City Concern’s Eastside Concern program and lives in CCC’s supportive housingDavid Russell, President and CEO of Adventist Health Portland
Next

On Monday, Nov. 6, Central City Concern ground onthe Blackburn Building, the last of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations to bring 379 units of affordable housing to Portland.

• • •

Yesterday, Nov. 6, Central City Concern (CCC) broke ground on the third of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations to supportive, affordable housing. CCC also announced the name of the building (25 NE 122nd Ave., Portland)—the Blackburn Building—which honors CCC’s President and CEO Emeritus Ed Blackburn, who recently retired after 26 years at CCC. Ed was instrumental in pulling together the Housing is Health initiative, which was the culmination of years of outstanding leadership and relationship building.

The two-story health care facility will serve 3,000 people each year with recovery and mental health services, as well as targeted primary care services. The clinic will include a pharmacy and 52 units of respite care, including 10 units of palliative care. Additional housing will include 90 units of transitional housing and 34 permanent homes. Integrated resident and health support services will help residents stay housed.

The groundbreaking celebration began at 2 p.m. CCC President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., Multnomah County Commissioner Jessica Vega Pederson and Metro Councilor Shirley Craddick spoke about the new project. Other speakers included Tricia Tillman from Oregon Housing and Community Services, Drew Hammond of US Bank, Melissa Garcia of Low Income Investment Fund and Heather Lyons from Corporation for Supportive Housing.

Community member and CCC client Mike Holevas described his journey from high school science teacher to addict, to a person in recovery working toward wellness and self-sufficiency. He once bought drugs on the very corner where the Blackburn Building will be. “This corner now can be the site where thousands who are suffering—and believe me, we suffer—can come for transformation, healing; families will be restored,” he said. “I’m so proud to be part of something that will bring hope and healing to thousands of people like me."

"This corner now can be the site where thousands who are suffering—and believe me, we suffer—can come for transformation, healing; families will be restored.”
- Mike Holevas, former CCC client

Additional speakers included representatives from the Housing is Health initiative’s six hospitals and health organizations: David Russell, Adventist Health Portland president and CEO; Eric C. Hunter, CareOregon president and CEO; Janet O’Hollaren, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals chief operating officer; Mark Enger, OHSU vice president of Network Operations; Pam Mariea-Nason, Providence Health & Services – Oregon executive, Community Health Division; and George Brown, M.D., Legacy Health president & CEO.

“The Housing is Health collaboration is an excellent example of health systems recognizing the impact housing has on an individual’s health,” said Rachel. “They’ve united for improving health outcomes as well as the common good of our community.”

"[The Housing is Health collaborative has] united for improving health outcomes as well as the common good of our community.”
- Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., CCC President & CEO

The developer is Central City Concern, the architect is Ankrom Moisan, the general contractor is Walsh Construction and the construction manager is GLI.

In addition to the Housing is Health partners, funding for the development of the Blackburn Building is provided by Oregon Housing and Community Services, US Bank, Portland Housing Bureau, CSH, Low Income Investment Fund, Oregon Health Authority, Metro, Energy Trust of Oregon and Multnomah County.

CCC is engaged in a $3.5 million capital campaign to complete funding for the Blackburn Building. Early supporters of this campaign include The Collins Foundation; Downtown Community Housing, Inc. Fund of OCF; Harbourton Foundation; The Hearst Foundations; Meyer Memorial Trust; PGE Foundation; Silvey Family Foundation; The Standard; Wells Fargo Housing Foundation; Building Owners & Managers Association of Oregon; Downtown Development Group; Melvin Mark Companies; Meridian Wealth Advisors; R2C Group; Acme Bader Fund of OCF; Brody Family Charitable Fund; Crooke Family Charitable Fund; Ginny & George Charitable Fund; Mitzvah Fund of OCF; the Paul & Sally McCracken Fund of OCF; and numerous individuals.

Find a full list of contributors to the Housing is Health initiative here.

For more information about the campaign or to make a contribution, please contact Kristie Perry, Director of Donor Relations, at 503-200-3926 or kristie.perry@ccconcern.org.



NHCW 2017: Serving a population where they live

Aug 18, 2017

On September 23, 2016, leaders from six Portland health organization gathered at Central City Concern’s Old Town Recovery Center to announce an unprecedented $21.5 million dollar investment in the Housing is Health initiative that will fund three new CCC buildings in Portland. The crown jewel of this shining trio is the Eastside Campus, which will serve medically fragile people and people recovering from substance use disorders and mental illness with a health care clinic and 172 housing units.

“This significant contribution is an excellent example of health organizations coming together for the common good of our community,” said Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO. “It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those who have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes."

Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

CCC will break ground on the Eastside Campus in late October 2017. The center will build on CCC’s existing Eastside Concern program, and will offer integrated housing and clinical services, including substance use disorder treatment, primary care and urgent care. More than 3,000 CCC patients each year will access care in a unique and welcoming health home environment.

The housing portion of the Eastside Campus will have about 172 units of housing, including short-term medical stabilization and palliative beds as well as transitional housing for people in recovery from behavioral health disorders. Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

“It’s important to serve people where they live."

“It’s important to serve people where they live,” said Blackburn. “This project will replicate the integrated care we give at our Old Town campus to help people get back on their feet and achieve health and self-sufficiency.”

The Housing is Health initiative is supported by Adventist Heath Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services. The new construction includes the Eastside Campus, Stark Street Apartments and Charlotte B. Rutherford Place apartments on N Interstate.

The CCC Eastside Campus is scheduled to open in Winter 2019.



NHCW 2017: Adapting the system to work for our most complex patients

Aug 17, 2017

Central City Concern's Summit team takes care of our Old Town Clinic's most complex and medically fragile patients. Instead of expecting patients to fit into a health care system, the Summit team adapts the system to work for them by offering flexible scheduling, around-the-clock availability, and even home visits. Like many of the programs we've featured during National Health Center Week so far, the Summit team goes above and beyond to break barriers and narrow the gaps that keep vulnerable individuals from becoming as well and healthy as they can be.

We're so excited to share this video about Summit with you, which features Summit team staff and several Summit patients talking about what sets this program apart and how it impacts the lives of those it serves. A version of this video was originally shown at the National Health Care for the Homeless Conference in June.




NHCW 2017: Starting primary care engagement outside clinic walls

Aug 16, 2017

There are few professions in the world that call on you to do your job in an RV, but that’s where Catherine Hull found herself a few weeks ago, helping the person who lived inside fill out intake paperwork. If she minds the odd working environment, she certainly doesn’t show it. After all, her role as Central City Concern’s Community Health Outreach Worker (CHOW) has also taken her under bridges and overpasses, into day centers and shelters, and onto most of the streets that form downtown Portland.

“My days are almost always pretty uncertain. A lot of the time, I get a phone call or an email and I’m off to respond at the drop of a hat,” she says. “Once I get to where I’m needed, I can help people figure out the different needs they have.”

CCC’s CHOW program was originally created partly in response to the difficulty of phone outreach to individuals who, though insured, weren’t engaging with our Old Town Clinic or any other primary care clinic, often leaving chronic health conditions unmanaged. Rather, these folks were utilizing the emergency room or acute care services at high rates for needs that could have been taken care of, and even avoided, with a primary care provider.

These potential patients—most unhoused or low-income—didn’t need reminders; they needed relationships to enter into and navigate a health care world that was as confusing as it was untrustworthy.

Calling people wasn’t enough. These potential patients—most unhoused or low-income—didn’t need reminders; they needed relationships to enter into and navigate a health care world that was as confusing as it was untrustworthy. So Catherine started hitting the pavement.

Hospitals contact Catherine when an emergency room patient who they had previously referred to the Old Town Clinic for primary care shows up again and again. Community members phone get in touch when they feel compelled to help someone on the street they see every day. CCC programs like Hooper Detox call her when a patient needs to establish a primary care provider in order to be referred to other programs. As long as there’s someone to meet, she goes.

Through it all, Catherine practices profound empathy. While following through on a primary care appointment may seem like a small task to many, she understands—and hears firsthand—what stands in the way.

“Patients typically have to wait a few weeks after their initial intake to see a provider, and that can clearly be frustrating when we’re asking them to take charge of their health,” Catherine says. “A lot of the time their primary concern isn’t primary care at all; it’s their substance use disorder or mental health or the simple fact that they don’t have a home.”

Lack of transportation, sleep deprivation, fear of being judged by a doctor, and a feeling of stuck in their situation place additional barriers to engaging with primary care. Catherine listens and then does what she can to help each person inch closer to primary care. She performs intakes on the spot, ensuring that the individual can see a provider even sooner. She hands out bus tickets, offers assurances that our care providers truly have heard it all before and are not in the business of judging, and true to her self-given title of “the queen of resources,” offers information that can be of any further help.

“It’s understandable that if someone doesn’t know where they’re sleeping each night, a clinic appointment two weeks from now won’t be at the top of their mind. So we’ll make a plan to look for each other on 4th Ave. every day to check in until the day of the appointment,” she says. “I’m hoping to bring what little bit of the clinic I can take with me to where they are.”

In addition to responding to calls and emails, Catherine holds hours twice a week at CCC’s Bud Clark Acute Care Clinic, which treats acute issues as a bridge until patients feel ready to engage with a primary care home. When a patient feels ready, Catherine is there to seize the moment.

“The ability of our patients to access care has improved markedly by having Catherine do her outreach,” says Pat Buckley, a provider who splits her time between Bud Clark Clinic and Old Town Clinic. “She facilitates people who desperately need to get into a primary care environment very quickly. CHOW’s been an amazing adjunct to CCC’s practice.”

“I’m hoping to bring what little bit of the clinic I can take with me to where they are.”

Catherine is aware that the CHOW program won’t result in every person she sees engaging with primary care, but she remains hopeful for each person she meets.

“Of course my goal is to get them excited about primary care, but if I can at least get them to start thinking about it, I’ll take it. I’ll keep trying as hard as I can to help them understand that primary care is a good thing to do, but I’ll always be understanding that there are so many things in the way.”

Until then, Catherine will continue going to where the people who don’t think they’re quite ready for primary care are. An RV one day, an underpass the next, and maybe an ER bed later. All of it is worthwhile as long as the people she meets get closer to setting foot inside Old Town Clinic.



NHCW 2017: Breaking down the walls between housing & health

Aug 15, 2017

While he waited for his name to rise to the top of the Central City Concern housing wait list, Glenn O. lived out of his van in northwest Portland. As he walked back to where he had last parked, he found his van stolen. Gone. And with it, all his possessions, including his dentures.

Not long after, he moved into CCC housing. But even with a roof over his head, his troubles weren’t over. The doctor he had begun seeing wanted him to eat healthier, but without dentures, the list of foods he could eat was short. What he could eat, and how he ate them, led to intestinal problems and months of feeling sick and uncomfortable.

He called his insurance to see if they would cover new dentures. After all, they were stolen, not carelessly lost. They said that they could only cover new dentures once every 10 years. He’d only had his dentures for three.

Glenn went back to gumming his food, feeling unhealthy, and going against his doctor’s orders.

• • •

Moving into Central City Concern permanent housing is often reason enough for our new residents to feel good about their trajectory. The assurance of having a roof over one’s head feels like a giant step forward toward something better. Indeed, we know that having housing is one of the most significant determinants of health, so becoming a resident of CCC housing is definitely an occasion to cheer.

However, being housed isn’t a guarantee that better health is on the horizon. Even for residents of CCC housing, especially those with more complex health care needs, successfully engaging with CCC’s health care services—or any health care services, for that matter—can feel like a world away. The connection between housing and health care is crucial: how well a resident's health needs are met is tied closely to a resident’s likelihood of successfully staying in housing, says Dana Schultz, Central City Concern’s Permanent Supportive Housing Manager.

Though CCC provides both housing and health care, the nature of the programs, as well as privacy considerations, have traditionally made it difficult to share information between the two areas of service. But where Dana saw walls, she also saw an opportunity. The situation called for a way to put teeth behind a core belief that housing is health. That way? A program called Housed and Healthy (H+H).

"Our supportive housing program realized that we can’t distance ourselves from our residents’ health—it’s everything to them and it’s everything to us."

“We started Housed and Healthy as an initiative to better support our residents’ health by engaging with them where they are: in our housing,” Dana says. “Our supportive housing program realized that we can’t distance ourselves from our residents’ health—it’s everything to them and it’s everything to us.”

The Housed and Healthy program serves to improve the connection between health clinics—be it CCC’s own Old Town Clinic and Old Town Recovery Center or other community providers—and CCC’s supportive housing program, and vice versa. Since H+H started, all new residents of CCC’s permanent housing are given a health assessment so that staff can gain a fuller picture of the new tenant. They are asked about their health insurance status, any chronic health conditions they may be dealing with, and who, if anyone, their primary care provider is.

Perhaps most importantly, new residents are asked to sign a release of information, which unlocks the line of communication between CCC’s housing and health service programs.

“Once the two program areas can start talking, we can immediately map out a web of support,” says Dana. “Our clinic can flag the resident’s electronic health record to show that they live in our housing and note who their resident service coordinator is in case they need their help reaching out to a patient. In turn, our resident service coordinators can know which providers and clinics their tenants are connected to in case health issues arise.”

Housed and Healthy represents a big shift in the way supportive housing sees its role in the well-being of its residents. Housing staff are integral to extending health care out from the clinic setting into where their patients live.

The health assessment can also help H+H coordinators identify potential issues—related to their physical or mental health, or to substance use disorder—that, if unaddressed, could result in a resident losing their housing because of violations that put the safety and peace of the rest of the housing community at risk.

“In the past, we’ve seen people not succeed in our housing for reasons that, in retrospect, were preventable,” she says. “If we know what to look out for and the team of support people we can coordinate with, we can put out fires before they really burn down a person’s entire life.”

Housed and Healthy represents a big shift in the way supportive housing sees its role in the well-being of its residents. Housing staff are integral to extending health care out from the clinic setting into where their patients live. H+H even brings opportunities for health education, such as chronic pain workshops and classes like Cooking Matters, straight to residents. In doing so, the chances that patients continue to have a place to live increase.

Glenn, who had seen Dana in his building frequently as part of her work as the H+H Coordinator, approached her about his denture problem. His issues didn’t put him at high risk of losing his housing yet, but he wanted to follow his doctor’s eating advice. He was, after all, nearly three years sober, and he wanted to continue feeling healthier.

She promised him that she’d look into it. She consulted with Glenn’s Old Town Clinic care team. She researched resources and made countless phone calls. Several weeks later, she gave Glenn the best news he’d received since learning that he had his own CCC apartment: she found a city program that would cover nearly the entire cost of new dentures.

“Dana did all the work I didn’t know how to do. The questions she asked me sounded like she knew a lot about what I needed,” Glenn says. “Now that I have dentures again, oh yeah, I feel healthier now. I’m so grateful to her.”

While Housed and Healthy is ostensibly a housing program, it functions as a way to not only expose residents to the many ways to better health, but as a de facto arm of health services that can reach into where their patients live. Gaps in care get caught and filled; residents are supported in better utilizing health care services; and people like Glenn find trustworthy faces to bring health-related concerns.

“Our housing staff want to see our residents healthier; health care providers want to see their patients housed,” Dana says. “It just makes sense.”