NHCW Health Care Hero: Charlesetta Dobson

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Central City Concern’s (CCC) Imani Center program is a shining example of how we tailor our services to meet the unique needs of a population. Imani Center counselors and peer support specialists provide their clients with Afrocentric, trauma-informed approaches to mental health and addictions treatment. It’s a life-changing program that represents the best and most innovative approaches CCC has to offer.

But the work they do—and the dramatic progress their clients make—can quickly unravel without stable, supportive housing.

That’s where Charlesetta Dobson, a housing case manager based in CCC’s Richard Harris building, enters the scene. Part of her case load is devoted to Imani Center clients making the transition into our supportive housing program. To Charlesetta, the link between housing and Imani Center’s health care services is bright as day.

“This housing provides them the stability that gives them a chance to succeed in the health care services they’re engaged in,” she says. “When you have keys here, you have that stability. You’re not having to worry about which doorstep you’re going to sleep in or if someone’s going to go through your stuff.”

“My mom was an addict. My father was an addict. A lot of my family members struggled with it. So I’ve always wanted to be part of the solution to help people avoid that and live up to their best potential.”

Charlesetta works closely with the Imani Center to support clients during their delicate first steps on the path of recovery. She meets with incoming residents before they move in, connects them to resources, and holds weekly check-ins with each person to keep them accountable to their treatment plan. She helps tenants connect their Imani Center treatment goals with their housing goals.

Need a food box? Can’t find the motivation to attend a treatment group? Interested in taking a community college class? Moving to Alaska and need to know what recovery resources are available there? Charlesetta’s got your back.

“The clients know they can always find an empathetic ear and unwavering support in Charlesetta,” says the Imani Center’s director, Linda Hudson. “It’s so clear to clients that she wants so much for them to succeed.”

To clients, Charlesetta is a model of someone who has everything together. She’s both knowledgeable and patient, compassionate and non-judgmental. She admits, however, that she hasn’t always been the person others see today.

Charlesetta grew up surrounded by problematic behaviors. “My mom was an addict. My father was an addict. A lot of my family members struggled with it,” she shares. “So I’ve always wanted to be part of the solution to help people avoid that and live up to their best potential.”

While Charlesetta feels fortunate to have avoided substance use, early and constant exposure to related behaviors like stealing derailed her plans. She eventually faced an 18-month sentence for organized retail theft.

“I remember thinking that this is not the plan! That was the point I started to get my life together,” Charlesetta says. “For me it was either 18 months in jail or 18 months to transform my life.”

Need a food box? Can’t find the motivation to attend a treatment group? Interested in taking a community college class? Moving to Alaska and need to know what recovery resources are available there? Charlesetta’s got your back.

She used the time going back and forth with the courts about her case to enroll in school. She studied hard, built relationships with professors, and committed to becoming part of the solution. She pursued her associate’s degree in alcohol and drug counseling, which led her to CCC as a Letty Owings Center intern.

While the work Charlesetta does with Imani Center clients is professionally satisfying, it also remains deeply personal.

“It’s important for me to help people who look like my mother, who look like my aunties—to be able to give them the resources and opportunities that I feel like my mother didn’t necessarily have access to,” she says. “It’s important for me to be on the other side of everything I saw and had experience in before.”

Charlesetta is living her calling. There are hard days, of course. Seeing residents submit a second positive urine test, which violates the program agreement. Seeing residents leave the program for various reasons. Knowing that she won’t be able to walk alongside their journey, at least for the time being.

But she’s inspired by those “who are working their butts off. The ones taking suggestions, following through with everything,” says Charlesetta. “I get an intense satisfaction when I see someone doing what they’re supposed to do, even if it’s not according to their original plan. Sort of like me.”