CCC is in Give!Guide 2019!

Oct 31, 2019

We’re thrilled to share that Central City Concern (CCC) has been selected as a nonprofit featured in Willamette Week’s 2019 Give!Guide! We are one of about 150 local nonprofits chosen by Give!Guide, and we’re honored to be among such incredible company.

This is our seventh year participating in Give!Guide — an opportunity to support our mission with a donation and receive fantastic gifts in return. In addition to helping us end homelessness, your donation also gives you the chance to win fantastic prizes from iconic Portland restaurants, your favorite local businesses and much, much more.

This year we’re partnering with CCC supporters John and Renee Gorham – the couple behind Toro Bravo and Tasty n Alder — to offer exclusive incentives just for you, our CCC family!

If you're ready to make a difference, make a gift to CCC any time between Nov. 1 and Dec. 31!

BIG GIVE DAYS

When you donate $10 or more on Give!Guide’s Big Give Days, you’ll also be entered for a chance to win a number of exciting prizes in addition to CCC’s exclusive incentives. Tomorrow, Nov. 1, is the first Big Give Day — when you donate $10 or more, you could win a $500 shopping spree to Powell’s Books! Explore all of this year's Big Give Days here.

JOIN THE PARTY

Give!Guide is hosting an official kickoff party Celebrate tomorrow at the Jupiter Hotel Next (910 E Burnside) from 5 to 7 p.m. Join the fun for music, food and prizes. The event is free and open to the public. Find details here.

STAY UP TO DATE

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for more frequent updates about Give!Guide and CCC through the end of the year. We’ll remind you about upcoming Big Give Days, share more information about our CCC-only incentives and even point you toward other nonprofits doing good, important work in our community.

When you give to CCC, you help bring hope and healing to those who need it most. Thank you for believing in CCC and supporting our work.



Donor Profile: John and Renee Gorham

Oct 29, 2019

Most Portlanders know John and Renee Gorham as the duo behind some of the city’s most exciting restaurants like Toro Bravo and Tasty n Alder. Their cuisine is renowned for the breadth of inspiration they draw from all over the world — from Spain to Israel to the Carolinas.

But when it comes to making a difference, the Gorhams focus on their own community. This holiday season, John and Renee are leveraging their star power to support Central City Concern’s (CCC) Give!Guide campaign, as well as those of several other nonprofits, particularly those addressing the homelessness epidemic in Portland.

We caught up with John and Renee for a quick Q&A to learn more about how they approach giving and doing their part to elevate the community.

Why did you decide to partner with CCC for the 2019 Give!Guide?
CCC’s wide range of services and versatility offers the most wraparound and overarching support to transform the lives of families and individuals in our community. Partnering with CCC in Give!Guide opens up the opportunity for us to reach a broader audience to support the critically important and necessary work with the most vulnerable populations of our community.

What inspires you to give?
In the restaurant industry we provide a service to those who can afford to dine out, but we also offer jobs and build a community within our group. There have been several points in our careers where we found family within the industry, so trying to create that sense of community beyond the walls of our restaurants is what inspires us to give.

How is your giving different than in past years?
Each year we shift our focus to an area of larger need. Right now it’s abundantly clear that homelessness is the most immediate problem facing our community. We’ve learned that collaborating with organizations who are on the ground providing services that make real differences in people’s lives allows us to leverage what we can do to make a meaningful impact. We want to be a part of the solution.

“Every person deserves an opportunity to better their lives and have a chance to champion the best life that they can live.”

What message would you like to share with the community?
Homelessness in Portland is something that needs all of our attention and our focus. Changing the lens of the way we all see homelessness is the first step all of Portland can take. Whatever got a person or a family into the situation they are in is irrelevant. Every person deserves an opportunity to better their lives and champion the best life that they can live.

Beyond what we see on the streets there is a huge population of people living on the cusp of homelessness. There is so much opportunity for us all to put our money where our mouths are if we want to make meaningful change in this community. We just can’t rely on someone else to fix a problem that is bigger than us all.

It’s just the damn right thing to do.

• • •

Give!Guide goes live on Friday, Nov. 1! Check out the details of our exclusive incentives for donors who give to CCC through Give!Guide this holiday season.



Attendees Put Compassion into Action at Annual Luncheon

Oct 18, 2019

On Tuesday, Oct. 15, Central City Concern (CCC) held our annual Compassion In Action fundraising luncheon at the Hilton Portland Downtown. This year, CCC used the opportunity to celebrate not only all that is possible when community members work together to bring lasting change to people in need, but also four decades of helping people find home, hope and healing.

With a blast of horns, Portland-based 12-piece funk and soul band Soul Vaccination kicked off the day’s program, performing their hit song “Funk P-Town” with several lyrics altered to celebrate CCC’s 40th anniversary.

CCC President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff then took the stage, thanking elected officials in attendance; the event’s Presenting, Home of Our Own and Ready to Work sponsors; and several corporate partners who have generously given to CCC for more than 20 years.

Rachel went on to speak about a concept that is vital to the staff members, clients and the very spirit of CCC: resilience. She shared that resilience “isn’t something people are born with. It’s something people are given, and they are given it through human connection.”

“Resilience requires relationships, not rugged individualism,” Rachel continues. “We are not the survival of the fittest. We are the survival of the nurtured.”

“Resilience requires relationships, not rugged individualism."

G. Robert (Bobby) Watts, CEO of National Health Care for the Homeless Council, served as the luncheon’s keynote speaker. Bobby tapped into the deep familiarity with CCC’s work that he’s developed as the leader of the nation’s preeminent membership organization of homeless health care organizations, people with lived experience of homelessness and advocates. CCC is, Bobby said, “doing some things that no one else is doing and they are doing some things better than most others are doing. We, as a council, are going to rely on them.”

Bobby then pivoted to speaking about homelessness as a national epidemic. He shared that our collective hope and goal should be moving toward “compassionate justice”: a society that not only sees housing and health care as human rights, but provides them as such. Our path toward that goal consists of doing what we know works: affordable housing and housing subsidies, health care to people experiencing homelessness, supportive housing, medical respite, practicing a Housing First approach, trauma-informed care, harm reduction and addressing racism.

The audience was treated to the premiere of “40 Years of Hope and Healing: The Human Connection,” a video feature that showed the transformative ripple effect of making human connection through the stories of two long-time CCC employees, Bobby T. and Medina. (Watch the video for yourself at the end of the post.)

     

Stacey Dodson, market president at U.S. Bank, followed the video to make the pitch. Before she began her ask, however, she shared about her intimate connection to the devastation that addiction can ravage on families, making the work of CCC all the more vital to our community.

Soul Vaccination closed the program with three more songs, including a raucous version of Earth Wind & Fire’s “September.”

In total, CCC’s 2019 Compassion In Action campaign raised over $290,000.

 



CCC Walks for Recovery

Oct 01, 2019

Central City Concern (CCC) wrapped up National Recovery Month on a powerful note this past Saturday, Sept. 28, at the second annual Walk for Recovery, where members of the Portland recovery community and their families united to improve Oregon’s fractured and incomplete addiction recovery system.

CCC staff and clients, along with their friends, family and hundreds of other community members and organizations, took part in the two-mile walk from southwest to northwest Portland, which felt more like a political march than a fundraising event. Key legislators and decision makers helped kick off the walk at an opening rally, sharing words of encouragement to participants about why mobilizing to address addiction is so important. Representatives from Oregon Recovers, which organized the Walk for Recovery, emphasized the goal of building a movement of people in recovery in order to drive widespread support for addiction prevention and treatment across Oregon.

During the walk, as participants passed by multiple addiction treatment and help centers — including CCC’s own CCC Recovery Center, Imani Center and Old Town Recovery Center programs — they proudly help up hand-made signs with messages of encouragement to those in recovery and calls to action for elected officials to increase access to treatment.

One of the largest contingents at the Walk for Recovery was made up of staff, clients and alumni of Puentes, CCC’s culturally specific recovery program for Spanish speakers. Ricardo Verdeguez, a recovery mentor and drug and alcohol counselor at Puentes, highlighted a significant barrier in recovery services: the lack of Spanish-language treatment programs.

"Today I have a life and I have a family because I am in recovery."

“After 30 years of battling addiction, there was no treatment for me as a third-generation Latino,” Ricardo shared during his speech at the Walk for Recovery rally. “I found treatment with Central City Concern and I’m grateful, because they have culturally specific treatment. Today I have a life and I have a family because I am in recovery.”

Puentes’ large presence at the Walk for Recovery was fitting, where increasing access to recovery services was a reoccurring theme. Oregon ranks 50th in the country — last place — in access to treatment. Puentes has worked hard to welcome Portland’s Spanish-speakers into a culturally responsive community where things like language, country of origin and documentation status are not barriers to beginning and maintaining a life in recovery. While much work remains in breaking barriers to preventing and treating addiction, we are proud to serve the Latino recovery community through our Puentes program.

With hundreds of Portlanders in attendance and over $100,000 raised to improve Oregon’s addiction recovery system, the Walk for Recovery was a success that CCC was thrilled to be a part of. While National Recovery Month might be over, our work to bring hope and healing to those struggling with addiction continues with the same determination and fire we witnessed during the weekend’s events.