CCC Celebrates National Volunteer Week 2019

Apr 10, 2019

Dear CCC supporters,

Happy National Volunteer Week! My name is Westbrook Evans and I am the new Volunteer Manager at Central City Concern (CCC). I have been working at CCC for two years now and am thrilled to take on a position where I get to work more closely with the amazing volunteers who support our mission in so many different ways.

National Volunteer Week is an initiative by Points of Light, an international nonprofit dedicated to engaging people in solving social problems through voluntary service. Each year nonprofits across the world come together around a theme to recognize the volunteers that make our organizations run and enrich our community. This year the theme is “Celebrate Acts of Service.”

Service, to me, has always been transformative, not only in the community where the work is done, but for the volunteer. Acts of service by our volunteers don’t begin and end with a single shift because our volunteers become advocates for the people we serve and our work 24/7. We highly value our volunteers not only for their work, but also for the message they bring back to our community about the importance of engagement. This week I would like to celebrate the acts of service our volunteers do every day for the people we serve!

Throughout the year we will continue to highlight individual volunteers and the work they do here at CCC. But for this Volunteer Week, we will celebrate our volunteer community as a whole. Please check out this article from Points of Light about service and if you know anyone who volunteers, help us celebrate them for their acts of service.

I look forward to getting to know all our volunteers!



Drawn Back Home: Black History Month 2019

Feb 20, 2019

By the mid-2000s, the King neighborhood of northeast Portland was in the thick of transitioning from a majority non-white and historically Black area to a majority white one. For then-12-year-old Jennifer, even the shifting color of the King neighborhood was still a radical, welcoming, life-changing difference from how she’d grown up.

“I mostly grew up in suburban areas. I felt a disconnect most of the time because my siblings and I were always the very few black kids in our schools,” Jennifer says. “My family moved to Portland in 2004, and from what we were told, we arrived sort of right at the start of gentrification in that neighborhood.”

For decades of Portland history, neighborhoods like King had been a bastion of the local Black Portland community, an arrangement not of happenstance but directly due to institutionalized redlining and discriminatory housing policies. Still, Black Portlanders created community where they could, fostering vibrant neighborhoods and civic life. But starting in the 1950s, the city’s myriad urban renewal projects in its north and northeast quadrants systematically dismantled and destabilized Black communities.

“My family moved to Portland in 2004, and from what we were told, we arrived sort of right at the start of gentrification in that neighborhood.”

Decades downstream in the early 2000s, north and northeast Portland became ground zero for gentrification, attracting people and investors from elsewhere with higher incomes, resources and political heft than the average Black resident. Between 2000 and 2010, nearly 10,000 Portlanders of color, mostly Black, moved out of the Portland’s central neighborhoods, including communities like King. Though some moved on their own accord, most were pushed by skyrocketing rents and property prices toward East Portland, where housing costs were relatively more affordable.

Jennifer would often follow her friend two blocks out of the way off NE Killingworth, a main thoroughfare in King, to walk past a particular house. Her friend would explain, in almost hushed tones, that it had been her grandmother’s family home. Had. Yet her friend was drawn back to the property, over and over again, with Jennifer in tow.

Her friend never spelled out the circumstances of why the home didn’t belong to her family anymore, but the massive displacement King residents had been witnessing—at least those still there to witness it—provided plenty to read between the lines.

Still, the historic residents of King were resilient, preserving their community bonds even as neighbors steadily moved out. “Compared to where I was used to living, I felt like I could still connect with our culture more, be around more Black people than I’d ever seen. I came to know the neighborhood and it felt really good to be around people like me. I felt so normal there. I didn’t stand out. I mean, it felt like home.”

"Compared to where I was used to living, I felt like I could still connect with our culture more, be around more Black people than I’d ever seen. I came to know the neighborhood and it felt really good to be around people like me. I felt so normal there.... it felt like home.”

That sense of home eventually faded as the winds of gentrification caught Jennifer’s family. They moved several times before Jennifer and her siblings went off to college, closer to the city’s outer limits with each subsequent move.

Jennifer first went to college at Western Oregon University. There, she gave birth to her daughter, Cambria, and soon transferred to Portland State University. As she approached graduation, she started looking for housing in the city and quickly realized that rents were out of her reach. She and her two sisters eventually found a home in East County.

“But I really wanted to find a way to get back to northeast or north Portland because I was so familiar with it. I was so familiar with my old neighborhood and I love the layout and things are so convenient.”

After a few years in Gresham, Jennifer heard about the Portland Housing Bureau’s N/NE Preference Policy, a “tool to begin addressing the harmful impacts of this legacy [of marginalization and displacement] by prioritizing families and individuals with generational ties to N/NE Portland for new affordable housing opportunities in the area.”

Months after submitting her application, Jennifer received a phone call that offered her a two-bedroom apartment in Central City Concern’s (CCC) Charlotte B. Rutherford Place. “It was such a relief,” Jennifer recalls. “I was in a little shock. I was grateful. It meant so much that I’d be back so close to my old neighborhood and be able to live on my own—to afford to live on my own—with my daughter.”

She pauses. “It was emotional because I realized that I didn’t just want this for myself; I wanted it for my daughter, too. I wanted her to see Black people, to be able to go to schools that were more mixed, where she saw people like her. Being back in the neighborhood would affect all that.”

Today, Jennifer and Cambria make their home in a third-story apartment at Charlotte B. Rutherford Place, located in the Arbor Lodge neighborhood, just slightly more than a mile west of King. Opened in December 2019, the affordable housing community project figured intentionally into CCC’s targeted efforts to meet the housing and health needs of African Americans.

Opened in December 2019, the affordable housing community project figured intentionally into CCC’s targeted efforts to meet the housing and health needs of African Americans.

At the grand opening, CCC President and CEO Dr. Rachel Solotaroff said, “We’re so proud that Charlotte B. Rutherford Place opened under the N/NE preference policy, opening up housing access to people with historical ties to neighborhoods that were once predominantly black, but targeted with an urban renewal plan that didn’t include those who had created their community here.”

Though there to celebrate, Dr. Solotaroff spoke to the modesty of the effort relative to systemic injustices. “Of course Charlotte B. Rutherford Place, nor the housing preference policy, are magic wands that we can wave to undo racial and generational traumas and injustices, but they are steps in the right direction,” she continued.

The Hon. Charlotte B. Rutherford added: “I am even more heartened to see the City recognize its callous treatment of the Black community in the past and attempt to make amends by providing preferences to come back for those families who have been displaced over the years.”

Projects like Charlotte B. Rutherford Place are just the start of righting past wrongs, and no one, including Jennifer, is under the belief that these policies and projects will revert northeast and north Portland to what it once was.

“I’m always reminded that this is not the exact neighborhood I grew up in. It’s always in the back of my mind. I know that,” Jennifer says. “But still, I hold so many sentiments with different parts of this area. To me, it doesn’t matter who’s there now. I still have memories of those places.”

Now living in a neighborhood that’s simultaneously familiar and foreign, Jennifer feels invigorated by fellow Black Portlanders wrestling with the same tension.

Now living in a neighborhood that’s simultaneously familiar and foreign, Jennifer feels invigorated by fellow Black Portlanders wrestling with the same tension. There’s a renewed effort, she feels, between Black Portlanders making their way back to historic neighborhoods and those who were able to remain there in the face of urban renewal projects and gentrification. She feels that there’s a buzz to regrow and reestablish a community, to connect the past to the future.

“Until I moved to Portland, my understanding of what it meant to be Black really came from TV and what I was taught in school because I did not have a community I belonged to outside of my immediate family. I’m excited that my daughter can grow up in a community with people who look like her and where she feels represented, and I’m also excited to work with people to process what’s happened in Portland and what we want it to become.”



Portland-area 2019 Black History Month Events

Feb 05, 2019

At Central City Concern, we believe that one of the most immediate, tangible ways to celebrate Black History Month is to support and attend events organized by and/or featuring Black Portlanders. There are dozens of amazing events scheduled for the Portland metro area throughout February, many of which are free and appropriate for all ages!

To help you easily find events you can attend, we’ve collected links to several calendars of Black History Month events. We encourage you to explore the richness of (and diversity within) Black history and culture by attending some of these events!

Black History Festival NW Calendar: Wildly popular last year, this month-long festival brings a jaw-dropping array of performances, exhibits, lectures, pop-up markets, food events and more to various locations all over Portland. The theme for 2019 is Our 2019 Theme is “Black Migration: The State of Black Love.” (Link)

Red Tricycle’s Black History Month Calendar: A popular resource for activities, Red Tricycle lists eight particularly family-friendly ways to celebrate Black History Month in Portland. (Link)

Annual Cascade Festival of African Films Calendar: In its 29th year, this film festival is the “longest running annual, non-profit, non-commercial, largely volunteer-run African Film Festival in the United States.” All films are shown at Portland Community College’s Cascade campus (with a few exceptions). All shows are free and open to the public. (Link)

City of Portland Calendar: Four events sponsored or organized by the City of Portland, city employees or Portland bureaus. ( Link)



Celebrating Black History Month

Feb 01, 2019

Black History Month is a time for celebration, reflection and hope for the future. Yet as we celebrate the beautiful, vibrant and resilient Black (African-American) culture, we cannot forget the struggles Black people have endured and continue to endure today.

Black people experience discrimination and racial profiling, and are disproportionately impacted by homelessness. This is why Central City Concern (CCC) invests in programs such as the Imani Center and Flip the Script to increase services to this community historically underserved by organizations that help people find housing, behavioral health services and employment opportunities. Afrocentric programs are a great start for our organization, but we know there is more we can do: not only to celebrate the history of the Black community inside and outside our organization, but also to identify and address the ways in which white supremacy drives care inequities. Recognizing our responsibility, CCC is committed to being a diverse, anti-racist, equitable and inclusive organization, with this promise reflected in our organizational leadership, as well as institutional practices and policies that promote diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI).

We are stepping closer to this goal. Freda Ceaser, previously CCC’s Director of Equity and Inclusion, is now CCC’s Chief Equity Officer (CEqO). Freda leads with vision, skill and innovation to inspire and push the organization forward. She will build on her current work, setting and implementing an overarching vision of DEI—both at the programmatic and administrative levels—that promotes inclusive practices in our structures, culture and leadership.

Afrocentric programs are a great start for our organization, but we know there is more we can do: not only to celebrate the history of the Black community inside and outside our organization, but also to identify and address the ways in which white supremacy drives care inequities.

CCC has also made additional investments in the Office of Equity and Inclusion, hiring Associate Director Mariam Admasu to provide support to the director’s leadership team. Mariam will hire an equity specialist in the coming months to add an additional layer of support to CCC staff. In order to ensure that the Office of Equity and Inclusion has the bandwidth and resources to move work forward, we have also engaged two Portland State University School of Social Work interns, Shaun Cook and Clarice Jordan.

CCC will invest as needed to follow through on our commitment to becoming more diverse, anti-racist, equitable and inclusive by building institutional infrastructure and capacity to do the work. In the coming year, CCC will work with a local consultant to capture a wide snapshot of where we are today with regard to equity and inclusion through interviews and listening sessions with CCC’s board, clients and staff. This assessment will result in an equity lens, DEI governance model and DEI organizational roadmap.

Lastly, CCC’s advancing equity strategic goals were made as a roadmap to ensuring the best, most responsive services possible to Black people and people of color, with a focus on intentional efforts to have our staff reflect the communities they serve.

While Black History Month presents an opportunity for CCC to celebrate Black culture, we also look ahead to the many opportunities during the remaining 11 months to make a difference!



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: January 2019 Edition

Jan 31, 2019

For the first spotlight of 2019, we’re featuring one of Central City Concern's On-Call Administrative volunteers, Christopher Schiel. The on-call volunteer position is one that allows folks who don’t have consistent time available throughout the week the chance to volunteer on an as-needed basis and support various departments throughout CCC.

Christopher has been one of CCC’s most motivated on-call volunteers and has taken on a broad range of tasks throughout the agency. His consistency, reliability, and unflappably positive attitude have been appreciated by many CCC staff. Read on to hear what Christopher has appreciated and learned and how administrative work has enriched his broader understanding of CCC.

• • •

Christopher helped serve a Thanksgiving meal to residents of CCC's Estate Hotel community in November 2018.Peter: What is your name and volunteer position?

Christopher: My name is Christopher Schiel and I am an on-call administrative volunteer.

P: How long have you been with CCC?

C: I believe it’s been about a year.

P: How did you become familiar with CCC?

C: I knew about the agency from seeing the vehicles around town, but also being aware that there were residential buildings downtown. And I had a superficial awareness of the organization, but not an understanding of what they did besides housing.

P: How did you find out about the volunteer position here?

C: I was actively seeking some volunteer position within the city and I was feeling like housing was at the front of minds, so CCC was at the top of the list. And I found [a position that] I thought was perfect for my skill set, which was project management and organizational stuff.

P: What about admin work was more attractive to you than a role that involved more direct contact with clients?

C: At the time, I was feeling a motivation to do something without really knowing where to start. The housing crisis is something that is very visible on the streets, but there isn’t much of a conversation about why that is beyond reactions on the news, Nextdoor, or from NIMBY folks who are corralling people around the city from one place to another.

My motivation for volunteering was the kind of acknowledgement that I knew that I didn’t know what was going on, really, so I wanted to get involved in some way, not only to volunteer my skills, but to greater understand or explore what is actually happening and admin seemed like the perfect way to do that.

"I’m understanding that the success of the whole mission revolves around a coordination of these services that isn’t obvious on the ground and certainly wasn’t obvious to me before I started"

P: And do you feel that you have learned more about housing and services within housing during your volunteering?

C: Oh, absolutely, yes. My very first task was to interview one of the heads of OHSU and the CEO of a job transition placement group to get their thoughts on the functioning of CCC, as well as their input on [CCC’s] strategic plan. That particular conversation turned out to be very enlightening about the way that this organization collaborates with other ancillary nonprofits throughout Portland. It started to get me thinking about how each of these missions can be compartmentalized and taken by collaborators to a certain degree of good.

Right after that I was doing survey entry for [satisfaction] surveys that were given to clients in various parts of CCC and just doing data entry, but to observe that feedback loop, to see how clients are coming thought the system, going from Old Town Recovery Center to different residential buildings, hearing what is going right what is going wrong, how all these things are cooperating to make not only this organization better but what the greater mission of tackling houselessness and the housing crisis is has been insightful.

P: Do you feel that the role has given you that chance to see how the different parts of the agency feed the greater mission?

C: Yes. My background of project management and data entry led me to believe that a lot of this volunteer role would be sitting at a computer, and some of it has been. But probably some of the more surprising and enlightening parts of this position have been those things that don’t involve a computer aspect.

By being in front of clients, being in the admin office, and working with Quality Management, I’m starting to get a sense of how intricate client-facing services are. I’m understanding that the success of the whole mission revolves around a coordination of these services that isn’t obvious on the ground and certainly wasn’t obvious to me before I started. The intricacy [of coordinating all these services] is kind of infinite.

"To just see the sense of community within that residential building; to see the cooperation, camaraderie and community; and to engage with clients at the level was personally meaningful."

P: Has there been one project in particular that was the most interesting?

C: I’m going to give you two answers. The most insightful experience was the strategic planning interview project, in that I got to hear specialized input about specific collaborations and projects and then I got to engage in conversation on some very high level stuff. So from an admin perspective that was the most insightful. But the most meaningful was serving Thanksgiving dinner. To just see the sense of community within that residential building; to see the cooperation, camaraderie and community; and to engage with clients at the level was personally meaningful. So it’s nice on the one hand to have the 30,000 foot view of admin, and then the ground-level view of daily life.

P: When you talk with others about this experience that you’ve had, what is it that you share with them?

C: I start with the range of services that are provided. I never knew what those trucks were doing, for one. But also that CCC isn’t just housing, it’s not just these buildings in the downtown core, but also the medical and rehabilitative services, counseling, job transition support, culturally specific programs. I emphasize the breadth of those service to people I speak with. It’s not just a bed to sleep in, it’s a range of support systems that allow people to get on their own two feet and eventually build a life.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: December 2018 Holiday Edition

Dec 18, 2018

For this month’s volunteer spotlight, we’re revisiting last year’s holiday spotlight format and posing a new question to a few of our volunteers.

One very big part of the holiday season is the idea of giving. What that means to each of us though, can be very different, so we checked in with a few of our volunteers to ask them, “What does giving mean to you?”

It was so humbling to see how each person, in their own way, expressed that their ultimate way to give was to provide their time and themselves to others in need. We feel incredibly honored to have volunteers that have found such pleasure in giving openly of themselves to others and that they have chosen our CCC community to give themselves to in their service.

Tricia

Tricia: When you say the word giving, the first thing that comes to my mind is time and being with people that are in need of some companionship, or that appear to be in need of it, or want some. For example, in my family, a lot of it right now is around them needing me to help out with grandkids. I intentionally choose to give of my time to them, even if they’re being taken care of in the moment. So there’s the part that’s kind of the needing of my services, and then there’s the part of just giving of my time and myself.

Peter: And isn’t that something we all wish we had more of: time?

T: I think for me that’s probably the strongest thing I have to offer. And that giving could be listening to somebody, it could be taking somebody somewhere, it could be just being with somebody. It’s something I want to do, it’s not something that’s like, “Oh my gosh, I have to.”

So that translates to [the Old Town Recovery Center’s Living Room program] as well. I like being here because a lot of people who are homeless or have mental health challenges or drug addiction… they can be pretty isolated as individuals and so just them knowing that somebody cares about them. I care. I care enough to sit with someone. So I guess giving is more emotional—helping to fill a need that somebody might have, or a want that somebody might have… things that we need, or maybe want, that are good for us.

P: And giving time that openly is really a way of giving yourself.

T: And meaning I care about you. I care. I want to spend time with you. So it’s not like I’m feeling like I have to do it, it’s that I want to do it. Obviously there’s lots of material things, but that doesn’t mean that much to me, personally. It’s really the offering a piece of myself to somebody who looks like they might need it.

."It’s really the offering a piece of myself to somebody who looks like they might need it."

Malinda

So I grew up in a small town in Ohio. At that time what giving meant to my family was, if you had, you gave. Whether it was time, money, skills, whatever—that was just part of life, to share and give. It wasn’t like, “Oh, we’re good people.” It’s just what you do.

When my dad died ten years ago, all these people got up at the funeral and said, “I promised I wouldn’t tell anyone this, but when my dad died in high school, [Malinda’s father] came to me and said, ‘I’ll make sure you go to college. Do not tell anyone.’” Nobody, even my mom knew these things. So giving wasn’t something where you wanted to go “Aren’t I great?” It was never that way. I think [my husband] Doug and I have always felt that way. If you have, give. It rewards you.

You know, we arrived here with no money in 1972, but we had skills, and with skills you make money to donate, which is great fun at our age to be able to do that. But what both of us love to do is volunteer. Giving means volunteering where we’re passionate. So this is for my passion. Giving is finding your passion. Giving is something you do. Giving is something you get to do. It’s our opportunity and people that do it get the reward of being a part of the things we’re passionate about. Not for thanks and not for recognition.

Lynn

To me, giving is, simply put, sharing my free time to help make a difference. Central City Concern changes the lives of so many. I always hope I make someone’s day a little brighter, because sharing my time certainly makes my day brighter.



Two Building Grand Openings Provide 204 New Homes!

Dec 12, 2018

Rain, cold and a whole lot of wind didn’t dampen the joy the Central City Concern (CCC) community felt during TWO building grand openings in as many weeks. On Tuesday, Nov. 29, the soggy clouds actually parted in the afternoon as we celebrated Hazel Heights, 153 units of affordable housing on SE Stark St. at 126th Ave. The next week, on Tues., Dec. 4, a cold but sunny day, we welcomed 51 households into their new homes at Charlotte B. Rutherford Place on N Interstate Ave.

Both buildings are part of the Housing is Health initiative—a pioneering commitment from local health organizations to support the development of urgently needed affordable housing in Portland.

At the Hazel Heights grand opening, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and Multnomah County Commissioner Jessica Vega Pederson spoke, as well as David Russell from Adventist Health Portland (a Housing is Health partner), Rilla Delorier from Umpqua Bank, Ann Melone from U.S. Bank and Margaret Salazar, director of Oregon Housing and Community Services. Before he cut the ceremonial ribbon, Hazel Heights resident Jerrod M., a single dad to three kids, expressed his gratitude that several other single dads will live in the community. He then sang a stirring honor song in his native language, Ojibwa.

    

    

Hazel Heights will welcome people exiting transitional housing programs who have gained employment and seek a permanent home, but still may have barriers to housing. The four-story building contains 153 homes total: 92 one-bedroom and 61 two-bedroom apartments. Rents will range from $412 to $995 per month, depending on Median Family Income.

These homes are important for supporting employed people with affordable housing. When people are housed, they have a better chance for a healthy future.

Exactly one week later, more than 100 people gathered at Charlotte B. Rutherford Place, a 51-unit building in North Portland. One hundred percent of its new tenants are part of the Portland Housing Bureau’s N/NE Housing Strategy Preference Policy, designed to address displacement and gentrification in historically Black North and Northeast Portland neighborhoods by prioritizing long-time or displaced residents with ties to the community for new affordable housing opportunities in the area.

Mayor Wheeler spoke again, along with Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury, CareOregon President and CEO Eric Hunter, Cathy Danigelis from KeyBank and Latricia Tillman from Oregon Housing and Community Services’ Housing Stability Council.

The Honorable Charlotte B. Rutherford was the woman of the hour. She is a community activist and former civil rights attorney, journalist, administrative law judge and entrepreneur. Her grandfather, William Rutherford, ran a barbershop in the Golden West Hotel—now a CCC residential building. Her parents, Otto G. Rutherford and Verdell Burdine, were major figures in Portland’s Black civil rights movement. Her father was president and her mother was secretary of Portland’s NAACP chapter in the 1950s, and together they played an important role in passing the 1953 Oregon Civil Rights Bill. In her remarks, Judge Rutherford said she’s glad the city is finally making amends for past injustices. “But it’s just a start,” she said. “There is plenty more to do.”

    

    

The ribbon cutting was a memorable one: Anthony J., a new resident who grew up in the neighborhood and is currently working hard to take full advantage of second chances, and Charlotte jointly cut the ribbon to much celebration.

Housing is Health’s coalition of six health organizations—Adventist Health Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services – Oregon—provided initial funding for both housing projects.

Hazel Heights’ major contributors include Umpqua Bank, Portland Housing Bureau, U.S. Bank, Oregon Housing and Community Services, Federal Home Loan Bank and PGE’s Renewable Development Fund. The design and development team is Central City Concern, the architect is Ankrom Moisan and the builder is Team Construction.

Charlotte B. Rutherford Place's major funders include KeyBank, Oregon Housing and Community Services, Portland Housing Bureau, Multnomah County and PGE’s Renewable Development Fund. The development team is Central City Concern and Home First Development, the architect is Doug Circosta and the builder is Silco Commercial Construction.

A robust capital campaign completed funding for these two buildings, as well as Blackburn Center, opening in July 2019.



Trans Awareness Week 2018

Nov 13, 2018

This week is Trans Awareness Week, a time to raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and to shed light on issues the community faces. The week leads up to Trans Day of Remembrance on Tuesday, Nov. 20, a deeply important observance to honor the memory of those whose lives have been lost to anti-trans violence.

During the past year, Central City Concern has moved forward in our work to ensure that our programs and services, as well as our staff members, are safe, welcoming and inclusive of our transgender and gender non-confirming clients. We’re on a journey to become the organization we’ve envisioned ourselves to be—and truly believe that we become. But that means a lot listening and learning, and of course acting, to make meaningful strides forward.

There are several events in the Portland metro area that mark Trans Awareness Week, all leading up to the Trans Day of Remembrance. Descriptions are from the event hosts:

Friday, Nov. 16

WontBeErasedPDX Call to Action: We will hold spaces for autonomous action from the community, and for people to come together with friends, neighbors, family members, coworkers, schoolmates, and other trusted comrades to plan peaceful direct actions. (Link)

Saturday, Nov. 17

Trans Action and Care Conference 2018: 2018 will mark the second annual Transgender Action & Care Conference (TACC) held at Portland State University! The Conference will take place Saturday, November 17th from 10:00-4:00 PM in the Smith Student Memorial Building (1825 SW Broadway). TACC is part of November's Trans Empowerment Resistance & Resilience Days, which celebrate and empower transgender, non-binary, gender-expansive, Two-Spirit, and gender non-conforming people and communities. This year's theme is "WE DEMAND MORE," inspired by the idea that trans people deserve more than just mere survival. We invite attendees to imagine a world where gender diversity is actively honored, rather than memorialized - and we get our roses while we're still here. (Link)

Monday, Nov. 19

Remember Us: Trans History of the PNW: Please join us for an interactive, educational workshop focusing on trans history. You will come away from this event feeling more connected to both our collective history and your own place in it. (Link)

Tuesday, Nov. 20

Trans Diaspora of Resilience: Born out of a shared frustration with white-dominated Trans spaces, Ori Gallery is partnering with Forward Together & Sankofa Collective Northwest to bring you a night of celebrating our Transcestors, eachother and visions of a better future than the one we've been handed.

The evening will feature a pop-up exhibition of Trans Artists of Color, hella food, bomb music, TPoC performers and a community altar space for you to contribute to. (Link)

Transgender Day of Remembrance Memorial Service: A memorial service in the Quaker tradition will include silent centering, reading of the names of those murdered in the US in the past year, a releasing fire and opportunity to share reflections (Link)

Butterflies: A Trans Day of Remembrance Youth Drag Show: Butterflies: A Transgender Day of Remembrance Youth Drag Show is a youth-organized and youth-performed drag show both honoring the transgender people we have lost and celebrating the transgender people that are still here, with a focus on transgender youth. This drag show is supportive of nonbinary individuals, gender non-conformity, and people of color. Hosted by the fabulous Heiress Cleopatra. (Link)

Wednesday, Nov. 21

Trans Day of Resistance: Let’s use the occasion of trans remembrance this month to build the TRANS RESISTANCE. Let’s use this community meeting as a jumping-off point for a coordinated movement against right-wing attacks and for fully-funded social programming, housing, Medicare for all, and other crucial priorities for the trans community and all working and oppressed people. (Link)

 



Central City Coffee Unveils a Bold New Look!

Oct 31, 2018

Wake up people! Women are finally getting the respect they deserve, especially at Central City Coffee.

Central City Coffee's previous branding was appropriate for a young social enterprise, but as the program has grown, the time was right to make a bold move.In 2013, Central City Concern (CCC) started a coffee roasting and distribution social enterprise to provide training and employment opportunities for people who live in CCC housing. In the beginning, our packaging featured coffee variety descriptions and highlighted CCC’s nonprofit mission. The coffee bags were kraft brown with pastel labels featuring our tag line: Drink well. Do good.

Over the past five years, Central City Coffee expanded our retail presence and is now available in more than 30 Oregon and Washington stores, as well as online.

Our training program has grown as well. Early on, we decided to train some of CCC’s most vulnerable clients: single moms working to rebuild their lives after facing homelessness and substance use disorder. We found that Central City Coffee’s full-time, day shift hours were a great fit for mothers who needed a set schedule and reliable childcare to reenter the workforce. And the skills they learned—marketing, office administration, sales—set them up for success when seeking meaningful employment after training.

Today, we remain committed to working with and training these amazing women. The Central City Coffee rebranded packaging is inspired by the hard work, determination and strength these women bring to our business every day. Our rebrand is a tribute to them.

Our new packaging is all about empowered—and empowering—women! With the help of design firm Murmur Creative, CCC’s Marketing Advisory Council and CCC staff and trainees, we have created bright, beautiful and bold coffee packages that showcase women, share their most inspiring qualities and stand out on store shelves.

The best part is our new tagline, created by one of our brilliant trainees: Nonprofit brew. Female crew.

Our new coffee line is infused with the spirit and resilience of the women who pull it all together every day. Please check us out at a specialty grocer near you. The women at Central City Coffee thank you for your support!


Varieties with new names:

  • Gutsy Goddess: French roast, bold, balanced, dark chocolate
  • Punk Princess: Dark roast, milk chocolate, nutty
  • Warrior Woman: Medium roast, most popular, caramel, pear, cinnamon
  • Magic Mama: Light roast, floral, berries, vanilla
  • Serene Sorceress: Medium/dark decaf, Swiss water processed, rich, nutty, chocolatey
  • Solstice Sister: Seasonal holiday medium roast, currants, spices, sweet


Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: October 2018 Edition

Oct 30, 2018

For this month’s spotlight, we’re celebrating National Physical Therapy month and spotlighting a volunteer who has lent her holistic approach to the practice to patients at the Old Town Clinic. Senior Director of Primary Care at the Old Town Clinic, Barbara Martin, had this to say about Anita’s work:

"Anita August has been an ongoing volunteer with Old Town Clinic, bringing in expertise on both general physical therapy as well as specific types of therapy to help with pain, such as persistent back pain. She has been flexible with figuring out what might work best for our patients, including group options or one-on-one appointments. She has also worked around our space and time constraints to help us make the most of her generous gift of time. She is positive, helpful, and supportive of our patients."

Read on to hear about how Anita got involved with CCC, how her practice of physical therapy has evolved over time, and what she admires about the work that goes on at the Old Town Clinic!

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Peter: How long have you been volunteering with Central City Concern?

Anita: I would say over five years, maybe close to six years.

P: And how did you find out about the agency or the opportunity?

A: Well, I lived in the neighborhood and I was very interested in the Old Town Clinic (OTC). I came to the open house for the new building, where I met Geoff, who was the Occupational Therapist here. We got to talking and our ideas were so similar I said “I would love to be a part of this.” And he said, “We can do that!” So that’s how I got involved.

"It takes courage sometimes just to get up in the morning and I’ve found many of the people at Old Town Clinic are courageous."

P: What is your role here now?

A: My role is physical therapy, but not the tradition physical therapy that I have been doing for over 50 years. Some years back, I began to be dissatisfied with how I was treating people. Mind and body are really one entity and that was what I was not accessing in this traditional type of PT. You “fix” a shoulder or a knee, but you haven’t changed the things that were behind that injury.

I went back and took a training course about four years ago in Alexander Technique. This is a system of working with people that is very congruent with Physical therapy. It looks at the way you can change habitual patterns of behavior. That could be how you sit, how you stand. Do you move so abruptly you “glitch” your joints every time you move? Does your posture have the habitual fear or startle tension patterns? Do you fall because you move impulsively and lose your balance? It looks at the subtle, hidden patterns of reaction. How do your react when someone accidently bumps into you? Are there people or circumstances you unthinkingly react to that are not helpful to you?

So that’s Alexander Technique, I think it is the best thing since sliced bread and I tend to go on and on about it. It works really well with Physical Therapy. There is just no gap between the two approaches for me. Alexander Technique may seem more indirect. I see you for a sore shoulder and I work on how you sit and stand to start. But in many ways I think it is actually more direct for getting better.

P: It sounds like it is kind of preventative in a way rather than restorative?

A: Both! It is preventive in a big way. For example, if somebody wants to take up yoga, often people go to a class and after the first or second time they go, they can’t move; they are really hurt. They haven’t known enough to be mindful of how they work to be able to manage themselves in the class.

P: And that’s an interesting thing because we often recommend yoga as a wellness routine despite the fact that there can be that barrier for some folks.

A: Not all Yoga is created equal! Out in the community there are different competencies of instructors. Here at Old Town, I have watched the classes and they are safe and wonderful. But in some community general classes, your instructor gives you instruction and you completely go into that without thinking. You don’t think, “Okay, stop, I’ve had back problems so let me be sure that my head and neck and torso are in a good place. Let me see if I can move that way with healing ease of movement.” Do I go as far as I can, especially if the person next to you is a pretzel, or do I keep good use of myself rather then going headlong into the movement?

But it is not only that; it’s many things. It’s how you react to somebody at work giving you a new task. Do you get so tense that all you can think about is “I have to do this right”, instead of stopping [and thinking], “Okay, let me see what this part is and step one, and step two, and step three.” This keeps you safe and also allows you to do a better job!

"I hear how clients are treated [at the Old Town Clinic], what happens here, and I think it’s exemplary. I think it’s something that should be a model. And I’m really delighted to be a part of that."

P: And is that physical carrying of tension something you see a lot with the population that we serve here?

A: Very much. But it’s not just here! People I see here have been through a lot. They’ve been up and down and they’ve dealt with some tough, tough things in their life. So in many ways, Old Town Clinic clients are more able to understand what I am talking about.

P: Was the population that you served before OTC the same as the one you serve now?

A: I’ve really been around. One of the PT jobs I had was working for a company that did ergonomics, so I was on the floor of Nabisco bakery and Costco. I loved this job! I learned about Dough Jams and loading cocoa into giant vats. I went home smelling like Ritz crackers!

I had interesting jobs in Hospice and ran a chronic pain clinic for a while in Pennsylvania. I also was administer of MacDonald residence, down the street, for a short time after it opened.

P: Do you see any differences between the folks you’ve served in the past and your clients at OTC?

A: It’s all the same to me. I like working one-on one, sometimes I like classes but my favorite is one-on –one. In so many ways everyone is the same and everyone is different.

P: Any stand-out moments during your time here?

A: Many of our people here, as I’ve said, have been through a lot. I often feel a strong connection, great affection, and enormous respect for those I meet here. Dealing with problems and aging is not, as it is said, for the faint of heart! It takes courage sometimes just to get up in the morning and I’ve found many of the people at OTC are courageous.

P: When folks ask, what do you tell them about your experience here?

A: I usually start out and say that I feel really lucky to be a part of this organization. I was lucky to meet up with Geoff, and lucky to have a role here.

P: Anything else you were hoping to be asked about your work or about physical therapy in general?

A: As I said, it’s really a good thing. After all this time, I am not diminished in my enthusiasm at all about where PT is going now. It is becoming more holistic, and with the Alexander Technique that I am bring into this, I focus on those kinds of principles. I also want to say something about the values of OTC. I observe how clients are treated, what happens here, and I think it is exemplary. It is something that should be a model. I am really delighted to be a part of that.

P: What qualities do you see that you would hold up as a model?

A: Enormous respect and empathy. And then kindness, just being kind. Being warm and kind and meeting people where they are. Less judgement, more empathy. I believe that in a more conventional setting, people would not be doing as well as they do here. The programs that are being offered, along with the idea of reducing opioid use and supporting a healthier lifestyle, give people a sense that they are cared for. It is very positive.