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housing  |  health & recovery  |  employment

As National Recovery Month Closes... 

In September, in recognition of National Recovery Month, Central City Concern staff, clients and alumni celebrated the 15th anniversary of one of our client-centered programs, the Recovery Mentor Program

We asked people to finish this sentence:  “Recovery has allowed me to….” 

Among the answers: 
Start over
Be a better man
Smile every day
Be free
Grow
Thrive
To be the parent to my children that I never had 
Travel
Give back 
Be honest
Be accountable
Have a family and be a good mom
Participate in my life

Central City Concern (CCC) began in 1979 as a recovery organization and I’d like to update you on some recent enhancements and expanded capacity in our recovery programs. As you may already know, we have an array of programs and we believe in tailoring programs to meet the needs of individuals. Increasingly, these three themes are driving our thinking:


Peers are important

In Our Housing and Through the Recovery Mentor Program 
The value of peers is well documented when it comes to recovery and when we formed the Recovery Mentor Program in 1999, we quickly saw the enormous difference that peers could make. 

Multnomah County has recently echoed our belief in this kind of programming by helping us expand the Recovery Mentor Program, adding three staff positions and 43 additional apartments for participants, nearly doubling the number of clients we can serve. (The full Mentor team is pictured below.)

Central City Concern is also expanding the use of peers for recovery services throughout the agency, often embedding such staff positions in our housing. We have added eight peer support positions in four buildings and have increased training of our front desk staff who are in frequent contact with the people we serve.

Domestic Violence/Recovery Project 

Multnomah County is also supporting a domestic violence/recovery mentor project to coordinate care for women who are affected by both domestic violence and substance use disorders. 

Estimates are that between 50-90% of women who have substance use disorders have experienced domestic violence. By using peers, we can present strong role models for women to inspire hope that change is possible through this integrated approach to treatment. Peer mentors will provide community outreach and engagement at domestic violence shelters and at alcohol and drug treatment programs. There will also be opportunities for cross-training and consultation between staff from programs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTYx4G9RIqMWe recently discussed this new program with leaders from the State of Oregon and Multnomah County at a Get to Know the Real Central City Concern event. Click here or on the screen shot at left to view the full content of that presentation. Get to Know the Real Central City Concern is a series of exclusive events offered throughout the year to community members who are making significant investments in Central City Concern’s work. For more information, contact Catharine Hunter

Choice can drive success

Opiate epidemic calls for urgent action
Central City Concern offers choices in housing, like our Community Engagement Program, with strong outcomes. We are moving more toward recovery choice, striving to bring the right resources and approaches to every individual. 

In recent years, the treatment field has had to step up to respond to the epidemic of opiate dependence and overdose deaths. While CCC continues to strongly support and value abstinence based recovery, we also have medication assisted alternate opioid treatment and overdose prevention initiatives in place throughout the agency. This has been a bold step for Central City Concern and our staff members are bringing an extraordinary level of openness and compassion to these new practices. 



Culture Counts
The Latino Community
In 2005, Central City Concern began offering recovery services for Latino adults and teens, filling a dire need in the community. Spanish-speaking staff members work with clients from an appropriate culturally-specific vantage point. Puentes staff members also serve mental health needs and reach approximately 170 people annually. With Multnomah County support, the program will soon add two staff positions and will expand by nearly 30%, with intentions of reaching 240 people annually.  

The African American Community
African Americans are over represented in the homeless population and for many years, Central City Concern has provided both mental health and addiction services to African Americans. This year, these programs will operate in an integrated fashion with oversight from a Director of African-American Services. This collective set of services is under the program name of The Imani Center. “Imani,” the seventh principle of Kwanzaa, means "faith" in Swahili.  Central City Concern chose this name as a positive expression of faith and hope. You’ll hear more about this new program in the coming year. 


On behalf of the estimated 23 million+ people in recovery in our country and the thousands who are in Central City Concern’s daily care, thank you for your interest in our work.


Ed Blackburn
Executive Director 


 

Copyright © 2015 Central City Concern. All rights reserved.


  

Central City Concern provides affordable and supportive housing, health and recovery services, and employment services and peer support to homeless and very low income individuals and families.

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