Medicaid Waiver Extension is Good News for Central City Concern

Jan 13, 2017

On Friday, Jan. 13, Governor Brown announced the federal government extended Oregon’s Medicaid Demonstration Waiver for another five years, effective immediately to run through June 2022.

“This is great news for Central City Concern,” said Executive Director Ed Blackburn. “As a health care provider serving people with very low incomes or experiencing homelessness, we have many patients who are highly dependent on Medicaid to access medical, mental health, and substance use disorder treatment.”

In 2013, the year before Medicaid expansion in Oregon, 47 percent of CCC’s patients were uninsured; two years later in 2015, only 11 percent of CCC’s patients lacked health insurance coverage. This expansion of Medicaid coverage improved CCC patients' access to needed care as well as enabling CCC to offer a more intensive care model that responds appropriately to the needs of these high-risk populations. Without Medicaid expansion, CCC could lose the capacity to serve as many as 2,000 homeless and very low-income patients.

“We treat every patient as an individual,” said Blackburn, “and many of those individuals rely on the Oregon Health Plan to access desperately needed services. Lisa G. is just one example of the many people who need this support and benefited from Oregon’s Medicaid expansion here at CCC.”

Lisa G. was terrified of losing her health insurance. Before Medicaid expansion, the Oregon Health Plan denied her coverage three times. “It’s something I think about all the time. Without the Oregon Health Plan,” Lisa said, “I just don’t know where I’d be.”

Lisa, 23, used drugs such as heroin and methamphetamine for five years. She also struggled with bipolar disorder, which further complicated her ability to stop using drugs. She tried quitting with no luck, until eight months ago when she accessed recovery support services through CCC. In Lisa’s case, medication assisted treatment helped her tackle her opioid addiction, so she could then focus on her severe bipolar disorder and other medical issues at CCC’s Old Town Clinic.

Lisa now lives in supportive alcohol and drug-free recovery housing and works in CCC’s On-Call Staffing program. She hopes one day to become a peer mentor and help others to overcome their opioid addiction. Without Medicaid expansion, Lisa wouldn’t have had access to critical recovery services that led to integrated health care, housing and employment services.

“Medicaid not only supports these individuals in their health and well-being,” said Blackburn, “but also leverages other resources such as housing and employment, further enhancing the health and well-being of our entire community. Though there are uncertainties about health care on the national scene, we’re tremendously relieved Oregon’s Medicaid Waiver will continue for five more years.”

CCC is a large non-profit organization, founded in 1979 in Portland, OR, that serves people experiencing or vulnerable to homelessness by providing health care and recovery services, housing, and employment services. In the last year, CCC helped more than 13,000 people, most through our 11 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) sites that offer integrated behavioral health and primary care. For more information, visit centralcityconcern.org.



CCC Outreach Workers Fill Gaps in Health Care

Oct 21, 2016

On Monday, PBS Newhour aired a fascinating and insightful segment on the rise of utilizing community health workers—already popular in other parts of the world like Sub-Saharan Africa—to better serve vulnerable and hard-to-reach patients. (You can watch the video above or on the PBS website.) As the segment makes clear, community health workers play a vital role in helping patients improve their health.

At Central City Concern, a number of our specialized health care programs rely on Outreach Workers to engage those we serve in direct, meaningful ways that truly exemplify our commitment to meeting patients where they are.

The Community Health Outreach Workers (CHOW) team works to bring individuals who are newly enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (Oregon’s state Medicaid program) into our Primary Care Home, where patients can find barrier-free access, team-based care, integrated mental health and addiction treatment, and additional wellness resources. They’ve also been working with the care teams at Old Town Recovery Center, CCC’s mental health clinic, to help their clients get connected with primary care.

CHOW team members may meet people on the street, at shelters or hospitals, or in their own homes, and often check in with patients to ensure that they are engaged comfortably into the care available to them.

Members of the CCC Health Improvement Projects (CHIPs) team, also known as our Health Resilience Specialists, are embedded in the four main care teams at CCC’s Old Town Clinic (OTC). CHIPs team member work closely with OTC patients (what we call “high touch” support) who have shown a high rate of hospital emergency utilization, helping them decrease unnecessary hospital use by providing intensive case management and addressing social determinants of health. CHIPs team members meet patients at home, on the street, in the hospital, or wherever else the patient needs engagement to happen most.

For those already living in our housing, CCC’s Housed + Healthy team provides a direct pipeline from housing to CCC health care. By performing a needs assessment with new residents as they move into their CCC home, the Housed + Healthy team can identify high needs residents who have gaps in their health care support. The Housed + Healthy team can streamline the referral processes to connect residents to care and even increase coordination between service providers. Further, our Housed + Healthy team provides on-site wellness education programming to encourage healthy living.

The work and impact of Outreach Workers are so important that they can be found beyond the three teams we highlighted here; programs like CCC's Bud Clark Clinic, among others, also lean on Outreach Workers to build relationships with those who are vulnerable in order to connect them with basic health care and services.

The flexibility of CCC’s Outreach Workers allows them to bring care and compassion to our patients. Maintaining and improving health outcomes takes work outside clinic walls, and our Outreach Workers are there to walk that journey with those we serve!



5,000 Covered and Counting!

Apr 28, 2016

This week, Central City Concern hit an exciting health insurance milestone. As of April 21, 2016, Central City Concern Outreach Specialists have helped more than 5,000 people enroll in the Oregon Health Plan or other affordable health coverage, or renew their coverage. Since the Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid in Oregon and many other states, we have seen the great benefits for the people we’ve helped enroll.

Our outreach efforts started on October 1, 2013 and have continued steadily since then to enroll as many CCC clients, residents, and community members as possible in the Oregon Health Plan (or, if they’re over income for OHP, in other affordable health coverage).

Our full time Outreach and Enrollment Specialists Conor Gilles and Alycia Reynolds (as well as former specialists Kevin Chou, Juliana DePietro, and Eric Reynolds), supervised by Benefits & Entitlements Specialist Team (BEST) Program Manager Kas Causeya, who coordinates CCC’s outreach and enrollment program with Executive Coordinator E.V. Armitage, have done an outstanding job enrolling individuals.

Even with our incredible Specialists, efforts to help people obtain health coverage are a team undertaking that stretches across CCC programs and locations. In addition to the Specialists, CCC has staff members who are trained enrollment "Assisters," as well as many staff who have done some support work in one way or another over the last few years. Current staff members who help with OHP enrollment include Sabra Eilenstine of BEST, Angie Gaia of Risk Management, Gabi Gallegos and Sylvia Woods of Eastside Concern, Abby Lee of Hooper Detox, and Dana Schultz of Supportive Housing.

Most of the enrollments have taken place at Hooper Detox, Old Town Clinic, Eastside Concern, and CCC Housing sites, but we’ve also enrolled many people at all other CCC programs sites. Approximately 20% of enrollments have taken place through outreach at Transition Projects, Inc., Union Gospel Mission, Portland Rescue Mission, and other community partners.