Clean Start PDX is off to a Great Start

Jan 22, 2018

The following article appeared in the winter 2018 edition of Hey Neighbor!, a free publication from Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN). Many thanks to NECN for recognizing and sharing the work of Central City Concern's expanding Clean Start PDX program!

• • •

Clean Start PDX is off to a Great Start
By Mischa Webley, NECN Staff Writer

On a Monday morning, J.P. King starts up the engine to his pick-up truck and heads across the river from Old Town to the Inner Eastside. As the lead crew member of the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods’ (NECN) pilot program, Clean Start PDX, he will spend the day making the rounds to various outdoor encampments in the inner northeast area, and working with the residents there. He cleans up abandoned camps, provides garbage bags and other cleaning supplies to active sites, and removes debris as needed. But to J.P., it’s the one-on-one contact with residents that makes the real difference, whether it’s directing people to shelters or connecting them with other resources in the city. “I know everyone in these camps by name,“ he says. “They know I’m here to help.”

The program began last year when Adam Lyons, Executive Director of NECN, was hearing from community members about the increase in trash and debris on roadsides, along with an increase in campers. “It’s a livability issue,” he says. “But it’s also a symptom of a much greater problem.” So, in partnership with Central City Concern, the Central Eastside Industrial Council and the Eliot Neighborhood Association, NECN secured funding from the city to address the issue in the inner eastside core.

Based on the same model that the Clean and Safe program uses, the idea isn’t to enforce camping policies for the city, but rather to help make the city cleaner and nicer for everyone who lives here. In fewer than six months of operation, it’s making a big impact: between August and October alone, J.P. and his Clean Start PDX crew have cleaned up 149 camps which included nearly 2000 bags of trash and 779 needles, and all manner of bio-hazardous materials.

Perhaps the most remarkable fact about Clean and Safe and Clean Start PDX is that it’s tackling multiple issues at once. It’s not just a cleaning service for the city streets, but is in fact a job-training and skills-building program to help individuals with a history of homelessness, addiction, or incarceration build a better future. “The program is a triple win,” says Jay McIntyre, program manager for Clean and Safe and chief liaison for Clean Start. “It’s a win for our employees, it’s a win for the people experiencing homelessness, and it’s a win for these neighborhoods.”

Looking forward, NECN hopes to use this model as a template for helping other neighborhoods do the same. “We’re trying to be proactive in solving a problem that most residents say is top of their list of concerns in Portland,” says Lyons. But he is quick to point out that, in so many words, it takes a village: “This isn’t an isolated problem, or one that’s unique to Portland. It’s complex and difficult, and it’s important that we as neighbors, businesses owners, and especially city officials take charge and try solutions instead of just throwing our hands up in frustration. It’s up to all of us to make this city the one we want to live in.”



A look back at 2017 to get us dreaming bigger in 2018

Dec 29, 2017

In 2017, Central City Concern (CCC) made significant headway toward increasing the number of affordable homes in Portland, bridged service gaps with new programs, further cemented our reputation as leaders in the national conversation about how to end homelessness, and much more. But most importantly, thanks to you, CCC helped thousands of our neighbors find housing, wellness, and opportunity through our compassionate and comprehensive model of care.

Below are some highlights from the year at CCC. As you read through this snapshot of what we accomplished, we hope you will feel good about all the things you made possible.

July: Hill Park Apartments became home to 39 households in Southwest Portland.

August: Charlotte B. Rutherford Place, a 51-unit apartment building for families, broke ground.

September: Stark Street Apartments, which will provide 153 homes, broke ground.

November: The Blackburn Building—combining a clinic, pharmacy, transitional and permanent housing—broke ground.

February: Multnomah County, the City of Portland, and CCC launched the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program to help low-level drug offenders work toward recovery, find stability and avoid reoffending.

February: CCC, Multnomah County’s Department of Community Justice, the Joint Office of Homeless Services and Meyer Memorial Trust together launched Flip the Script, a culturally specific reentry program that aims to reduce recidivism.

March: CCC joined forces with Health Share of Oregon and CODA, Inc. to form Wheelhouse, a program to expand Medication Supported Recovery services throughout the Tri-county area.

May: CCC Clean Start trains formerly homeless workers to help keep neighborhoods clean by removing trash and graffiti. The program works with the City of Portland’s One Point of Contact.

May: Ed Blackburn, Portland Business Alliance Community Partner of the Year

July: Town Center Courtyards family housing community, Gold Nugget Merit Award

October: Ed Blackburn and Central City Concern, National Alliance to End Homelessness Pioneers in Innovation and Excellence Award

November: Housing is Health Collaboration, Portland Business Journal Innovations in Corporate Philanthropy Award

January: After a fire displaced 98 residents of CCC's Hotel Alder building, community members rallied to send a flood of donations to meet the needs of our tenants.

August: Close to 300 runners and walkers attended Portland's first Heroes in Recovery 6K. Proceeds of the race benefited CCC and Hooper Detox.

March: The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness highlighted CCC Recovery housing.

April: CCC hosted Kimberly Johnson, director of SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, for a visit that included a Recovery Housing “fish bowl” dialogue.

June: CCC staff members and a health care consumer hosted six informative and well-received presentations at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.

January: Ed Blackburn, CCC's executive director since 2008, announced that he would retire later in 2017. A national search began in the spring for his successor.

August: Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., was announced as the new President & CEO for CCC. She had been with CCC since 2006, first as CCC’s Medical Director, then as Chief Medical Officer since 2014

September: Freda Ceaser was named CCC's director of Equity and Inclusion. She was previously the Director of Employment Services at CCC's Employment Access Center.

April: CCC highlighted our robust volunteer program and partnerships during National Volunteer Week.

August: CCC celebrated National Health Center Week by sharing the many ways we extend our health care work past clinic walls and directly to where people live.

The Imani Center program increased the number of people they serve with culturally responsive Afrocentric approaches to mental health and addictions treatment by 50 percent. They also held the first two graduations in the program's history.

CCC's social enterprises—Central City Coffee, the Central City Bed, On-call Staffing and CCC Clean Start—employed 80 formerly homeless clients over the year.

CCC's Recycling and Reuse Operations Center, a program that gives abandoned property a second life, processed more than 44,000 pounds of items (91% of which was kept out of the landfill) and provided nearly 700 clients with much-needed household items and clothing.



The 2017 Sandy Anderson Award Winner: Way More than "just an enforcer"

Dec 20, 2017

During the Old Town Clinic (OTC) all-staff meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 6, Billie Kay Stafford, OTC's operations manager, was recognized with the Health Services Advisory Council’s (HSAC) 2017 Sandy Anderson Award.

Billie Kay, or BK as she's affectionately known across Central City Concern, was an exemplary choice to be this year's awardee. For the last three years, the Sandy Anderson Award has been given by HSAC to a staff person who:

- Is always person-centered in their interactions with consumers.
- Puts the needs and goals of consumers first.
- Listens deeply and sees and hears beyond how people might seem on the surface.
- Is collaborative and solves problems with us instead of for us.
- Keeps long-term care goals in mind while also meeting people where they are.
- Can instill hope, no matter what.

Billie Kay is well-known and much-admired for the excellent job she does keeping OTC a calm and safe environment. If a patient is upset, she deftly intervenes in a way that makes them feel heard and de-escalates them, but also makes it clear what the clinic rules are around behavior to keep OTC a welcoming environment for everyone.

As our Old Town Clinic has grown in the number of patients we serve, the staff we employ, and the services we offer, Billie Kay has been an essential part of improving patient access and the patient experience. Despite the countless moving parts that make OTC what it is, Billie Kay makes sure that the clinic operates as efficiently as possible.

Upon the announcement of her recognition, Billie Kay received a standing ovation from OTC staff. Clearly touched, she said through tears and, as always in her trademark Texas accent, that the award was especially meaningful for her in light of its namesake and past honorees.

"I look at the people that have gotten this and the person it's named after as being people with huge hearts, that everybody respects and loves. I see myself as just the people think of as just the enforcer."

Billie Kay's commitment to centering our clinic's work on the people we serve, her ability to collaborate to solve problems big and small, and her obvious love of our patients ensure that her colleagues certainly see Billie Kay as more than that. "I love my job and I love y'all," she said.

Congratulations, Billie Kay!

Past winners of the Sandy Anderson Award include OTC Care Team Manager Carol Weber in 2015 and Old Town Recovery Center psychiatrist Phil Shapiro in 2016.



A Room Full of Furry Faces

Nov 28, 2017

The following was written by Bonnie Suba, who provides security at our Old Town Clinic, about Kally Stark, a phlebotomist who serves patients at OTC.

• • •

For a couple of years now, I have been the security officer at the Old Town Clinic. I provide safety and security for both staff and patients, as well as visitors. I complete rounds during closing of regular business hours and meet and greet staff that are finishing up for the day. I usually will come upon some staff members that are committed to finishing the day’s tasks no matter the quitting time. I usually peek my head in the doorway and inquire if everything is okay or anything needed. This brings me to the purpose of me sharing this story.

A few months ago, as I was doing my regular rounds of the clinic, I was checking the second floor and noticed that Kally was still in her lab. Kally is a phlebotomist and works in a small room without windows. I can see Kally from the doorway, but I do not enter the lab because I find that the lab is private, being that blood or bodily fluids are being removed from someone. I find this to be very private in nature and usually an anxiety-filled moment. Therefore, sometimes I just signal her a “thumbs up” and she gives me a “thumbs up” in response, acknowledging that she is fine and soon to be going home.

However, this one day, I decided to step into her laboratory to speak to her. When I stepped into her lab, I was captivated by all the black and white pictures of dogs and cats and a rabbit and possibly a squirrel that lined her walls in the laboratory. I asked Kally where she got all these pictures of these animals. She told me that most of them were photos of her client’s pets. She explained to me that most of the patients come into the lab and are already highly anxious about coming into the clinic and even more so the lab. She shared with me that many clients have little more than their pets. Having pictures of their pets on the walls eases their anxiety and makes the process more personal than clinical for the patient.

She shared with me that many clients have little more than their pets. Having pictures of their pets on the walls eases their anxiety and makes the process more personal than clinical for the patient.

There were 8x10 pictures lining the walls and another wall behind the door where some of the staff’s canines and felines. Kally stood there and told me the names of the pets on the wall and about some of the clients that owned them. I felt a personal touch and peacefulness when Kally was explaining all the pictures and how she wanted her clients to feel less anxious while being in the world in which she works—drawing blood.

While the placing of photos of canines and felines may seem small and insignificant, they have a comforting and enduring impact on the wellbeing of the clients. I truly want to acknowledge that Kally created a therapeutic environment, probably without even knowing it. She has genuinely gone above and beyond her calling in her profession! I applaud you Kally and I am certain that your clients give you a standing ovation!



Continuing to listen to trans voices

Nov 16, 2017


Happy Transgender Awareness Week 2017! According to GLAAD, this special week, Nov. 13 to Nov. 17, is set aside to “help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and address the issues the community faces.”

In this space last year, we shared about the numerous steps Central City Concern was taking to ensure that our programs and services, as well as the staff members providing them, were as affirming and inclusive of our transgender patients and clients as possible. This year, we want to provide an update on our efforts to do so!

Trainings: CCC continues to offer trainings year-round to our staff members about working with trans and gender non-binary patients and clients. Several lead staff members have also made it a point to attend trainings hosted by community organizations so they can share what they learn with our program staff.

We continue to encourage our training attendees to approach the sessions from a place of humility. What Eowyn Rieke, CCC’s Associate Medical Director of Primary Care, said last year continues to apply to our approach: “We’re working toward a culture of humility as it relates to gender identity—recognizing that there are great differences at play here and that we need to be humble about our assumptions.”

"We’re working toward a culture of humility as it relates to gender identity—recognizing that there are great differences at play here and that we need to be humble about our assumptions.”
- Eowyn Rieke, Associate Medical Director of Primary Care

CCC Director of Equity and Inclusion Freda Ceaser says that this posture has provided the organization with a blueprint to fully operationalize trans affirming program services across the agency. She says that in the coming year, her goal is to work with every CCC program to begin an initial assessment of procedures and policies to become more trans affirming and inclusive.

“It’s so rewarding to see how the work of health services intentionally recognizes and affirms the identity of each of our patients. I want every person we serve, no matter their gender identity, to feel accepted, valued, and respected.” 

Trans Support Group: Chrysalis, the trans and gender non-binary support group that formed last year in response to what we heard from our patients, has been thriving. Open to patients of Old Town Clinic (OTC) and Old Town Recovery Center (OTRC), Chrysalis is a safe place where, according to facilitator Shanako Devoll, “people can talk about the difficulties of navigating everyday life and strategies used to address safety, mental health, and substance use.”

Group members say that Chrysalis helps them counteract the isolation they can feel by being part of a group that understands each other’s struggles and triumphs. At each session, attendees share their experiences, bring information about resources they’ve come across, and slowly build a community of shared experiences together.

The group meets bi-weekly. While the make-up of each meeting can differ, Chrysalis averages about five attendees each time the group comes together. Chrysalis is currently open to new members; in mid-December, the group will close for six weeks to allow the group members build trust and create the safe space they need.

"I want every person we serve, no matter their gender identity, to feel accepted, valued, and respected.”
- Freda Ceaser, Director of Equity and Inclusion

Electronic Health Records: Thanks to CCC’s amazing EHR implementation team, our health services can now make changes to patients’ gender identification information faster and easier than ever.  

Responding to the Needs of the Trans Community: As we continue to listen to our trans patients, we’re making changes that we believe are positive for them and the larger community.

All our multi-stall bathrooms inside OTC and OTRC now have signs that emphasize our support for individuals using the bathroom that best fits with their gender identity.

To better support trans patients and clients in substance use disorder treatment programs, our services are working toward making our urinalysis collection process more trans affirming.  

And finally, Margot Presley, an OHSU Doctorate of Nursing Practice candidate, used her doctorate project as a way to seek out and listen to trans voices at our Old Town Clinic. Margot’s project, “Patient Engagement in Quality Improvement: Raising the Voice of Transgender Patients Experiencing Homelessness” used patient engagement and qualitative inquiry techniques to interview people about their experiences as trans patients of OTC. Their feedback was used to recommend changes to our clinic operations with the goal of better meeting their needs.

Her manuscript is in process of being published in Transgender Health, “the first peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to addressing the healthcare needs of transgender individual;” Margot also presented a poster showing her work at several conferences. 

• • •

Each year, Trans Awareness Week leads up to the Trans Day of Remembrance on Nov. 20, an observance to honor and remember those whose lives were lost to acts of anti-trans violence. There are a number of events in the Portland metro area to participate in that day. All descriptions are from the event hosts: 

Thursday, Nov. 16
Keynote featuring Jennicet Gutiérrez: How to Get Involved, Hosted by Portland State Temprr Month and PSU Queer Resource Center
: Join us for our TEMPRR keynote panel event with activist Jennicet Gutiérrez! As a founding member of La Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, Gutiérrez's activist experience with transgender rights and immigrant rights has given her great knowledge on how to get involved with various types of activism. This panel will also have local activists who will answer questions and share more about their activism. (Link) 

Friday, Nov. 17
5th Ave. Presents: ReAgitator, hosted at Fifth Avenue Cinema
: Join us in honoring Trans Day of Remembrance a few days early with an incredibly inventive film from independent trans-filmmaker Dylan Greenberg. Her film Re-Agitator: Revenge of The Parody, tells the bizarre story of a mad scientist using a cynical serum to revive a beautiful woman back from the dead leading to complete and total chaos. Using an arsenal of homages and spins off of classic and modern horror, Re-Agitator is bound to satisfy a weird and experimental itch. The film will feature an introduction from Dylan herself, including discussion of her experience with being an indie filmmaker and multi-media artist in NYC. This event will be donation-based instead of our regular ticketing prices, all proceeds will go to the artists. (Link) 

Sunday, Nov. 19
Trans Day of Remembrance March & Interfaith Vigil
: Please all Transgender folk and Cisgender allies join us in reverence and solidarity to honor the fallen and make a stand against Transphobia. We will gather at Terry Schrunk plaza for a staging and a brief program whereupon we will process to the First United Methodist Church for a candle lighting ceremony for the fallen and a message of hope and renewal from local area spiritual leaders followed by a reception where light refreshments will be served. (Link)

Monday, Nov. 20
Transgender Day of Remembrance 2017, hosted at Portland Community College
: This event is being planned by the Portland Transgender community, with the support of Portland Transgender organizations, Portland LGBTQIA2+ organizations, and allies, and is being led by Portland Transgender People of Color. (Link)

Transgender Day of Remembrance Memorial Meeting, hosted at Multnomah Friends Meeting House: We welcome you to join us on this day to mourn and honor the lives of those who have been murdered in the previous year because of anti-transgender hatred.

We gather to remember. We also gather to pray for, and to dedicate ourselves to work for, a world where transgender people are safe from hatred and violence. (Link)



Downtown Clean & Safe Appreciation Day 2017

Oct 09, 2017

On a crisp, sunny morning in Portland’s Director Park, the Downtown Clean & Safe board members gathered to celebrate the good work of the organization and appreciate some key people.

Clean & Safe board chair, Peter Andrews, welcomed the crowd of about 75 people and shared how the program helps make Portland a walkable city. “Just a few statistics so you can get a feel for how much this program makes a difference in our city,” he said. “In 2016, our cleaners picked up 638 tons of trash, 16,822 needles, cleaned 52,048 biohazards and removed 37,265 graffiti tags. This year we are on track to pick up more than 23,000 needles. Last year, our Sidewalk Ambassadors made 51,532 visitor contacts, making Portland the wonderful and inviting place it is. We also placed all of the twinkly lights up on the trees you see downtown during the holiday season, decorating 750 trees. These numbers speak for themselves. Downtown Clean & Safe is an ongoing advocate for a vital downtown.”

Mayor Ted Wheeler presented the Downtown Champion Award to Central City Concern’s (CCC) President and CEO Emeritus, Ed Blackburn. “Ed’s leadership, passion and compassion have influenced policy and funding at the state and local level,” Mayor Wheeler said, “and has directly impacted the lives of thousands of individuals who struggle with addiction and homelessness.”

“Ed’s leadership, passion and compassion have… directly impacted the lives of thousands of individuals who struggle with addiction and homelessness.”
- Mayor Ted Wheeler

CCC’s President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff then presented two Cleaner of the Year awards to Greg Davis and Matt Carr.

Davis is the lead employee on the Clean & Safe graveyard crew. He came to CCC through Hooper Detoxification Stabilization Center in 2013. He graduated from CCC’s Community Volunteer Corps (CVC), completed a trainee period with Clean & Safe and was hired as a permanent pressure washer in 2015. Two years later, he was promoted to lead worker. “On a daily basis, Greg makes sure the trash is cleaned up, graffiti is removed and that all service calls are completed,” said Solotaroff. “Greg is extremely personable, professional and a fantastic ambassador for Central City Concern and Clean & Safe.”

“Greg is extremely personable, professional and a fantastic ambassador for Central City Concern..."
- Dr. Rachel Solotaroff

Carr, born and raised in New York, and moved to Portland in 1992. He spent the majority of his adult life struggling with addiction. After a few attempts to trying to get clean on his own, he realized he couldn’t do it alone. In June 2016, Matt was accepted into Central City Concern’s Recovery Mentor Program. During this time, Matt successfully completed CVC by spending 80 hours giving back to the community at local non-profits. After his completion of the CVC, he was hired to work as a trainee at Clean & Safe in February 2017.

Right from the start he proved to have an incredibly strong work ethic and the desire to learn and grow in his position. Over the next six months Matt proved to be an extremely reliable and dedicated employee, who was always willing to go above and beyond. Matt showed so much pride in his work, he was promoted to be the third Clean & Safe special projects bicycle cleaner. “Matt’s dedication and hard work has contributed to a higher level of service provided throughout the district,” said Solotaroff. “Matt has repeatedly proven he is an asset and a great ambassador for Central City Concern, Downtown Clean & Safe and everyone who lives, works or visits in the Downtown Portland area.”

Matt proved to be an extremely reliable and dedicated employee, who was always willing to go above and beyond. Matt showed so much pride in his work, he was promoted to be the third Clean & Safe special projects bicycle cleaner.

Andrews then presented the Security Officer of the Year awards Officer Josh Dyk and Officer Samson Blakeslee.

The Portland Downtown Business Improvement District contracts with CCC to keep clean a 213-block area in central downtown and along the bus mall. In six-month trainee positions, CCC Clean & Safe employees remove graffiti, contribute to public safety, and keep downtown free of litter and debris. Clean & Safe hires its employees from CCC's Community Volunteer Corps program.

Toward the end of their six-month work experience, Clean & Safe employees engage in practical, employment development workshops at the Employment Access Center where they also may also access one-on-one assistance in the job search process. Some graduates of Clean & Safe move onto employment at Central City Concern in janitorial, maintenance, pest control and painting roles that maintain CCC’s 23 buildings.



CCC announces new director of Equity and Inclusion

Sep 28, 2017

Freda Ceaser, CCC's new director of Equity and InclusionFreda Ceaser, MSW, joined Central City Concern’s executive leadership team as director of Equity and Inclusion on Tuesday, Sept. 19. 

“Freda has been a valued member of our staff for 13 years and has always viewed her work through an equity and inclusion lens,” says CCC Chief Medical Officer Rachel Solotaroff, MD. “She will move CCC’s initiatives forward that promote diversity and inclusion as well as address racial and cultural equity in our services and as an employer. We’re excited she’s formally moving into this role.”

Freda worked her way from the front lines at CCC’s Employment Access Center to her current position of Director of Employment Services. She has provided consistent leadership and involvement in CCC’s Diversity Committee over the last five years and is instrumental in CCC’s ongoing Equity and Inclusion Assessment work. Most recently Freda provided the vision and advocacy for Flip the Script, a new reentry program for African-American clients that provides wrap around services with a focus on breaking the cycles that send people of color back to prison.

“I am so honored to serve in this role especially in light of these uncertain times that we find ourselves in as a nation,” Freda says. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to work on these important issues with an incredibly dedicated team focused on improving, creating and implementing programming for underserved and marginalized populations, as well as their emphasis and focus toward promoting a workforce that reflects the agency’s diversity, equity and inclusion values.”

Freda is a lifelong Portland resident and earned her Masters of Social Work degree from Portland State University. Her lived experiences, education and work in the trenches are the driving forces for her passion for promoting racial equity in the community



Introducing CCC's new President & CEO, Rachel Solotaroff, M.D.

Aug 14, 2017

Rachel Solotaroff, M.D. has been named new President & CEO for Central City Concern (CCC), a major provider of housing, health care and employment support to people experiencing homelessness in Portland, Oregon. The role will be effective at the end of September 2017.

Rachel has been working with CCC since 2006, first as CCC’s and Old Town Clinic’s Medical Director and as Chief Medical Officer since 2014. She has been a member of CCC’s Executive Leadership Team since November 2014. During her time at CCC, Rachel has overseen inpatient and outpatient alcohol and drug treatment, primary care and mental health care. She has developed key strategic initiatives and stakeholder partnerships to respond to community needs and has championed data-driven models of care for specific populations, from expansion of treatment for homeless people with opioid use disorder to an advanced medical home for medically complex homeless individuals.

In her leadership of Old Town Clinic, she secured national recognition from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's LEAP project as one of the 30 highest-performing clinics in the United States, as well as achieving recognition as an NCQA Tier 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home. In 2014, Rachel received the Karen Rotondo Outstanding Service Award from the National Healthcare for the Homeless Council.

In addition to her work at CCC, Rachel was Assistant Professor at Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) from 2007 to 2014. She has also worked as a staff physician from 2004 to 2006 at the Portland VA Medical Center. Rachel earned her BA from Brown University and her medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School.

“There is no greater honor than serving as the leader of such an extraordinary organization as Central City Concern,” said Rachel. “I am humbled and excited to partner with our staff, clients, stakeholders and community members to advance our collective mission of ending homelessness in our community.”

Central City Concern’s board and staff worked with a recruiting company in an exhaustive, national talent search for its new leader; the search attracted more than 300 inquiries. “While we always knew that CCC had top talent, it was an illuminating experience to have this knowledge vetted and confirmed by a rigorous, national process,” said CCC Board of Director’s Chair, William Wiechmann. “The board is confident about Rachel’s ability to lead the agency in an evolving health care landscape, oversee the building of nearly 400 units of new housing and guide the expansion of the organization’s employment services.”

Ed Blackburn, Central City Concern’s leader since 2008, will move to an Emeritus President & CEO status. He will assist with leadership transition and will work to complete the organization’s $3.5 million capital campaign related to three housing projects. Ed’s 25 years of service to Central City Concern will be honored at the organization’s annual Compassion in Action luncheon on October 10 at the Hilton Portland & Executive Tower.

“I have had the wonderful opportunity to work closely with Rachel for 11-some years,” said Ed. “She has consistently demonstrated a remarkable devotion to our mission, a highly intelligent approach to organizational development, a special ability to communicate to a diversity of people and a truly impressive work ethic. I enthusiastically support the Board's decision in selecting Rachel as the new President & CEO of CCC.”

CCC was founded in 1979 and helps nearly 14,000 people yearly. It employs approximately 900 people and has an annual budget of more than $80 million. It is a Federally Qualified Health Center, providing primary, behavioral and substance use disorder care across 13 locations in the metro area. It also owns/manages more than 1,700 units of affordable housing with nearly 400 additional units in development. Its employment services help roughly 1,000 people gain jobs each year. Learn more at www.centralcityconcern.org.

Click here to read a recent Oregonian interview with Ed as he reflects on the history of homelessness and his 25 years of service to CCC.



Participating in Life in a Way She Never Thought Possible

Jun 21, 2017

Yesterday's blog post focusing on the Central City Concern employees who earned diplomas in the past year shared a few lines from the written remarks of one of the graduates, Kari Fiori. However, we found her whole statement to be so encouraging, inspirational, and indicative of the strength and compassion of our employees that we decided to share it in full.

• • •

Lynda Williams [of the Recovery Mentor Program] plucked me from De Paul Treatment Center over six years ago, giving me the chance to continue my "adult time out" at the Recovery Mentor Program. I desperately needed it. I wasn't ready to go back into the workforce, and knowing my history with relapse, I simply wanted to continue focusing on my recovery. I needed to get the foundation firmly in place, and I wanted to make sure I put nothing in front of the importance of not picking up, one day at a time.

Going out with the Community Volunteer Corps into the community allowed me to to get a feel for having a schedule and showing up when I was supposed to. I was able to get health care at the Old Town Clinic... the first time I'd had access to health care in many years. I went to a lot of 12 step meetings and did a lot of soul searching while I was in the Mentor Program. One thing I knew is that I wanted to get a bachelor's degree. I'd always been a good student, but my addiction didn't allow me to finish school. Every time I relapsed, I dropped my classes. Eventually, I gave up my dream of college, convinced I'd never stay clean or get a degree.

I decided to go back to school when I had two years clean and sober. I chose two years simply because I didn't want to focus on anything except not picking up for that amount of time (an amount of time I'd never been able to put together before). I was glad I waited because it was overwhelming and scary and, had I not had the recovery tools I'd gained during my first two years clean, I don't know if I'd have remembered that my recovery was my number one priority. Luckily, I did remember.

I picked Public Health as a major because it was a large umbrella that touched on so many things I care about deeply: the environment, personal health, city planning, community, etc. I never realized how political Public Health as a topic was until I started really learning about what goes into keeping us safe and healthy. I don't have to tell you how so many public programs live and die by the local, state and federal budgets passed.

During my first couple of years of school, I survived by cleaning houses. I had a decent little business built up, but the work was difficult for my middle-aged body. I still had no idea what career I was headed for, I only knew that I wanted to follow my heart and major in something that mattered to me.

One day, as I was walking across the campus, I got a call from Lynda Williams, the female Mentor at the Recovery Mentor Program. She told me that, because of the Affordable Care Act, the Mentor Program was going to expand, and would I be interested in applying for the new female Mentor position? It was a no-brainer! Of course I wanted to, and I did.

It's been two years now that I've been working as the evening and weekend Mentor at both the Estate and the Madrona Mentor Programs. It's like a dream job: I get to welcome our newest clients and talk to them about recovery and take them to meetings. Working for Central City Concern is such an honor. The work we all do affects the health of so many people, and those effects are felt not only by our clients, but by their family members and loved ones, as well.

Homes, Health, and Jobs is what it says on the CCC logo. Getting people off the streets, providing them with medical care in a place that treats them as valued members of the community, offering people a chance to get clean one more time, providing valuable mental health services, offering training and jobs through Clean and Safe and the on call positions, providing both Housing First and abstinence-based recovery programs in order to help the most people... these things and more are the things Central City Concern does that make the public's health better here in Portland.

I couldn't be prouder to be a member of the CCC workforce. Having benefited from services at a time I so desperately needed help has made me a true believer. I always tell our clients, "You are in a good place. You lucked out!" because I know it's true. I can't believe how much I lucked out, landing a job in the field I chose as my major before I even finished college! I don't know where I'll end up in five or ten years, career-wise. I only know that I plan on staying within the CCC family.

I'm so happy I'm getting my bachelor's degree, 29 years after beginning my college career in California. This coming Sunday I'll be walking in Portland State's commencement ceremony. My recovery is still my top priority, and because of that, I get to participate in my life in a way I never thought possible.



Moving Forward with Persistence & Determination

Jun 20, 2017

Freda Ceaser, Director of Employment Services, told the graduates, Representatives from local colleges and universities with whom CCC partners to provide scholarships were recognized.
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On Tuesday, June 13, CCC recognized 16 employees who earned diplomas ranging from a GED to master’s degrees, and awarded scholarships to 12 employees continuing their studies in higher education. Click on a photo to begin the slideshow of select photos from the event.

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“If you get, give. If you learn, teach.” –Maya Angelou

Central City Concern (CCC) has a work culture based on compassion. A huge component of our day-to-day experience is promoting learning, both in ourselves as well as the people we serve. Every June for the last four years, CCC has honored the self-motivated learners who work for our agency and have pursued formal education on their own time.

This year, on Tuesday, June 13, CCC recognized 16 employees who earned diplomas ranging from a GED to master’s degrees, and awarded scholarships to 12 employees who are continuing their studies in higher education. CCC partners with local colleges and universities to provide monetary help for selected students/employees.

The commencement ceremony featured words of congratulation and encouragement from Joe Chapman, CCC’s chief human resources officer, who told the participants, “you exemplify two important factors: persistence and determination.” Amanda McGovern, CCC paralegal and scholarship recipient, quoted inspiring words from Maya Angelou. And Freda Ceaser, CCC’s director of Employment Services, told her story of coming to CCC from prison, working her way up to a director position, raising a family, and gaining her college degree at the same time. “If I can do it,” she assured, “anyone can do it.”

One graduate, Kari Fiori, a CCC recovery peer mentor for the Recovery Mentor Program, received her BS in Public Health from Portland State University. She couldn’t attend the CCC commencement but sent written remarks: “I'm so happy I'm getting my Bachelor's degree, 29 years after beginning my college career in California,” she wrote. “My recovery is still my top priority, and because of that, I get to participate in my life in a way I never thought possible.”

Another graduate, Jay McIntyre, received his BS in Portland State University’s Management and Leadership program. Jay is CCC’s Clean and Safe/Clean Start Program Manager. He first came to CCC as a recovering client in 2007 when he moved into the Estate building and got involved with CCC’s Employment Access Center.

Jay started working at CCC in January 2008 as an on-call janitor. He quickly got a regular position turning over rooms, and was then promoted to a Janitor 2 position with more responsibility. “I was grateful for a job, but I knew my potential was more,” Jay said. “I had my GED and needed to go back to school to get further in life.”

He applied to PSU in 2014 and dove into the program with help from his parents and grants. “A CCC/PSU scholarship covered the gap in tuition and books for two years,” Jay said. “It was a godsend. I am so grateful for the opportunity. It’s fantastic to get to the next level.”

Jay and his wife, who also came through CCC programs, have a blended family of five children and now own their own home. His daughter graduated from high school this month. For the last three years, Jay has spent every weekend on school work; he’s looking forward to having more time with his family. “I was doing it for me and so my family has a better life,” he said. Fittingly, he graduated on Father’s Day. “I started with a little goal plus another little goal; eventually they all add up. Once you get that self-confidence, you can reach for the stars.”