Olympia Provisions: Making First-rate Meats, Providing Second-chance Careers

Jan 23, 2018

Central City Concern (CCC) takes great care in building relationships with great employers. Our Employment Access Center assisted 1,126 job seekers in 2017, and several of them have gone to work for a fantastic partner: Olympia Provisions.

“Olympia Provisions is committed to enriching the lives of each other, our community and our environment,” says Taylor Janes, Olympia Provisions Human Resources leader. “So we work with CCC to help people find new chances and new opportunities to do good work that they can be proud of. We have had great success with multiple employees who were hired with limited knowledge of meat processing, USDA factory sanitation and/or restaurant operations.”

Olympia Provisions and CCC have been working together on-and-off for about five years, placing people who may have had barriers to employment in the past such as substance use disorders, criminal justice issues or homelessness. Cheryl M. found her position at Olympia Provisions through CCC’s Employment Access Center. She describes her past work experience as “poor,” so she was especially happy to get a job as restaurant dishwasher there in August 2017.

"We're committed to training new skills and developing our employees as people and professionals."
-Taylor Janes, Olympia Provisions Human Resources leader

Getting a job at Olympia Provisions is a great move for anyone. Taylor says their work environment is relaxed, positive and focused on producing the best product possible, every time. “We have fun and we get it done,” he says. “We're committed to training new skills and developing our employees as people and professionals. There is ample room for vertical growth for those who are motivated and diligent. We offer competitive wages, generous paid time off, health benefits, an Employee Assistance Program, discounts around Portland, free shares of delicious meats and free cooked lunch every day!”

Cheryl says, “My favorite things about working there are the people and the atmosphere. I really enjoy working there a lot.”

Olympia Provisions, founded in 2009, is a team of dedicated employees who craft the finest award-winning charcuterie (prepared meats such as salami and pate) in the world and provide unrivaled customer service at five restaurant locations around Portland. “We are known in households, restaurants and grocery stores as the premier makers of authentic, old-world charcuterie. Our vision is to make the world better through food and to make people happy. We are doing this by being obsessed with quality, relentlessly pursuing mastery in our professional positions, and being committed to enriching the lives of each other, our community and the environment.”

Anyone who has sampled Olympia Provision’s delicious products can taste the care and devotion the company has to their work. CCC is grateful to have them for a partner, and the feeling is mutual.

“Over the years employees who come to us from CCC have demonstrated reliability, initiative and positive can-do attitudes,” Taylor says. “As such, they have been promoted through the ranks to supervisor and management positions. We'd like to find more excellent employees like them!”

To learn more about Olympia Provisions, visit their website.



Clean Start PDX is off to a Great Start

Jan 22, 2018

The following article appeared in the winter 2018 edition of Hey Neighbor!, a free publication from Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN). Many thanks to NECN for recognizing and sharing the work of Central City Concern's expanding Clean Start PDX program!

• • •

Clean Start PDX is off to a Great Start
By Mischa Webley, NECN Staff Writer

On a Monday morning, J.P. King starts up the engine to his pick-up truck and heads across the river from Old Town to the Inner Eastside. As the lead crew member of the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods’ (NECN) pilot program, Clean Start PDX, he will spend the day making the rounds to various outdoor encampments in the inner northeast area, and working with the residents there. He cleans up abandoned camps, provides garbage bags and other cleaning supplies to active sites, and removes debris as needed. But to J.P., it’s the one-on-one contact with residents that makes the real difference, whether it’s directing people to shelters or connecting them with other resources in the city. “I know everyone in these camps by name,“ he says. “They know I’m here to help.”

The program began last year when Adam Lyons, Executive Director of NECN, was hearing from community members about the increase in trash and debris on roadsides, along with an increase in campers. “It’s a livability issue,” he says. “But it’s also a symptom of a much greater problem.” So, in partnership with Central City Concern, the Central Eastside Industrial Council and the Eliot Neighborhood Association, NECN secured funding from the city to address the issue in the inner eastside core.

Based on the same model that the Clean and Safe program uses, the idea isn’t to enforce camping policies for the city, but rather to help make the city cleaner and nicer for everyone who lives here. In fewer than six months of operation, it’s making a big impact: between August and October alone, J.P. and his Clean Start PDX crew have cleaned up 149 camps which included nearly 2000 bags of trash and 779 needles, and all manner of bio-hazardous materials.

Perhaps the most remarkable fact about Clean and Safe and Clean Start PDX is that it’s tackling multiple issues at once. It’s not just a cleaning service for the city streets, but is in fact a job-training and skills-building program to help individuals with a history of homelessness, addiction, or incarceration build a better future. “The program is a triple win,” says Jay McIntyre, program manager for Clean and Safe and chief liaison for Clean Start. “It’s a win for our employees, it’s a win for the people experiencing homelessness, and it’s a win for these neighborhoods.”

Looking forward, NECN hopes to use this model as a template for helping other neighborhoods do the same. “We’re trying to be proactive in solving a problem that most residents say is top of their list of concerns in Portland,” says Lyons. But he is quick to point out that, in so many words, it takes a village: “This isn’t an isolated problem, or one that’s unique to Portland. It’s complex and difficult, and it’s important that we as neighbors, businesses owners, and especially city officials take charge and try solutions instead of just throwing our hands up in frustration. It’s up to all of us to make this city the one we want to live in.”



A look back at 2017 to get us dreaming bigger in 2018

Dec 29, 2017

In 2017, Central City Concern (CCC) made significant headway toward increasing the number of affordable homes in Portland, bridged service gaps with new programs, further cemented our reputation as leaders in the national conversation about how to end homelessness, and much more. But most importantly, thanks to you, CCC helped thousands of our neighbors find housing, wellness, and opportunity through our compassionate and comprehensive model of care.

Below are some highlights from the year at CCC. As you read through this snapshot of what we accomplished, we hope you will feel good about all the things you made possible.

July: Hill Park Apartments became home to 39 households in Southwest Portland.

August: Charlotte B. Rutherford Place, a 51-unit apartment building for families, broke ground.

September: Stark Street Apartments, which will provide 153 homes, broke ground.

November: The Blackburn Building—combining a clinic, pharmacy, transitional and permanent housing—broke ground.

February: Multnomah County, the City of Portland, and CCC launched the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program to help low-level drug offenders work toward recovery, find stability and avoid reoffending.

February: CCC, Multnomah County’s Department of Community Justice, the Joint Office of Homeless Services and Meyer Memorial Trust together launched Flip the Script, a culturally specific reentry program that aims to reduce recidivism.

March: CCC joined forces with Health Share of Oregon and CODA, Inc. to form Wheelhouse, a program to expand Medication Supported Recovery services throughout the Tri-county area.

May: CCC Clean Start trains formerly homeless workers to help keep neighborhoods clean by removing trash and graffiti. The program works with the City of Portland’s One Point of Contact.

May: Ed Blackburn, Portland Business Alliance Community Partner of the Year

July: Town Center Courtyards family housing community, Gold Nugget Merit Award

October: Ed Blackburn and Central City Concern, National Alliance to End Homelessness Pioneers in Innovation and Excellence Award

November: Housing is Health Collaboration, Portland Business Journal Innovations in Corporate Philanthropy Award

January: After a fire displaced 98 residents of CCC's Hotel Alder building, community members rallied to send a flood of donations to meet the needs of our tenants.

August: Close to 300 runners and walkers attended Portland's first Heroes in Recovery 6K. Proceeds of the race benefited CCC and Hooper Detox.

March: The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness highlighted CCC Recovery housing.

April: CCC hosted Kimberly Johnson, director of SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, for a visit that included a Recovery Housing “fish bowl” dialogue.

June: CCC staff members and a health care consumer hosted six informative and well-received presentations at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.

January: Ed Blackburn, CCC's executive director since 2008, announced that he would retire later in 2017. A national search began in the spring for his successor.

August: Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., was announced as the new President & CEO for CCC. She had been with CCC since 2006, first as CCC’s Medical Director, then as Chief Medical Officer since 2014

September: Freda Ceaser was named CCC's director of Equity and Inclusion. She was previously the Director of Employment Services at CCC's Employment Access Center.

April: CCC highlighted our robust volunteer program and partnerships during National Volunteer Week.

August: CCC celebrated National Health Center Week by sharing the many ways we extend our health care work past clinic walls and directly to where people live.

The Imani Center program increased the number of people they serve with culturally responsive Afrocentric approaches to mental health and addictions treatment by 50 percent. They also held the first two graduations in the program's history.

CCC's social enterprises—Central City Coffee, the Central City Bed, On-call Staffing and CCC Clean Start—employed 80 formerly homeless clients over the year.

CCC's Recycling and Reuse Operations Center, a program that gives abandoned property a second life, processed more than 44,000 pounds of items (91% of which was kept out of the landfill) and provided nearly 700 clients with much-needed household items and clothing.



The 12 Ways of Christmas... Holiday Giving!

Dec 05, 2017

Whenever December gets into full swing, we’re asked how people can support Central City Concern as a way to do good during the holiday season. This year, we’ve compiled a dozen ways you can give to CCC, making it easier than ever to find a way that works for you to make a difference in the lives of our clients!


Willamette Week’s Give!Guide: Portland easiest path to year-end giving. Visit CCC’s Give!Guide page to make a gift while earning fun incentives. Plus, donating $10 or more on Big Give Days gives you a chance to win an extra special prize package!


Double your impact: If you decide to become a monthly donor or to increase your current monthly donation to CCC through our secure online donation portal, the Maybelle Clark Macdonald Fund will match your gift dollar for dollar! A $25 monthly donation will become $50, a $50 monthly gift becomes $100, and so on!


Adopt-a-Child: Help us bring joy this holiday season to the more than 300 children living in CCC’s family housing! Learn how you or your business can help make the holidays bright for our families working toward recovery and stability.
 


In-kind Wish List: Portland’s wet and cold winter season creates unique needs and challenges for our clients, especially for those who are living outside. Our In-kind Amazon Wish List offers a convenient way to purchase and donate items to meet our current needs.


AmazonSmile: Many people find Amazon.com to be a convenient way to take care of their shopping. The AmazonSmile program allows you to link your Amazon shopping cart to CCC so that a portion of your Amazon purchases will be donated to us.


Volunteer: Giving can always be more than about money or items. CCC volunteers give their time, skills and presence to help our programs do more and do better. Visit our Volunteer page to learn more about our opportunities or submit an interest form.


Make a one-time gift online: Make a one-time monetary gift through our secure donation website and know that your donation will make a difference in the lives of people CCC serves. Even a $50 gift can be used to provide shoes for three children in CCC’s family housing program.


Season of Sharing: The Oregonian has chosen CCC’s Letty Owings Center (LOC) as a featured beneficiary in the paper’s annual holiday fundraising drive. Read the Season of Sharing story to find out how our inpatient treatment program for young mothers can alter the path of a young family for good.


Cooking Matters Wish List: We are currently in need of kitchen supplies to help keep Cooking Matters—a program that teaches our clients cooking basics and healthy eating—going at CCC. Our Cooking Matters Amazon Wish List makes it easy for you to donate the items we need!


Evergreen In-kind Needs: Download our list of year-round needs to find out how you can provide items for the people we serve, whatever time of year you’re able to give. In most cases, we will accept items in both new or gently used condition.


Fred Meyer Community Rewards: Did you know that you can support us while shopping at any Fred Meyer store? All you need to do is link your Fred Meyer Rewards account to CCC. Once it’s linked, Fred Meyer will donate a portion of your spending to CCC!


Events: Keep an eye on the CCC events page for information about upcoming fundraising events. Each year, hundreds of community members gather to support and celebrate the work CCC is doing to end homelessness one person at a time.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: November 2017 Edition

Nov 30, 2017

This month’s spotlight features a volunteer who came aptly qualified for our Cooking Matters program, which is a partnership between Central City Concern and the Oregon Food Bank that teaches clients the skills and knowledge required for healthy cooking and eating habits. Having previously volunteered with a different Cooking Matters session and given her experience in the health care industry, she couldn’t have been a better fit to volunteer with the program! Linda Nguyen, who supervised Nickie in the program, said about her work, “The Cooking Matters team at Old Town Clinic was honored to have Nickie share her time and knowledge with our program. Nickie’s kind, calm, and compassionate spirit helped create a friendly environment where our clients felt safe and supported throughout the 6-weeks program.”

Read on to see why Nickie has continued to volunteer with the Cooking Matters program, and what was so special about the classes at CCC.

• • •

Peter: What is your name and volunteer position?

Nickie: My name is Nickie Dane and I am the Cooking Matters lead assistant.

P: And you had done the Cooking Matters program before coming to CCC, right?

N: Yes, I was a grocery store tour coordinator [with a Cooking Matters program] in North Carolina. People would be referred to this day of tours through the health department or WIC [the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children], and we’d put on like six in one day, so people would come in and go through the grocery store and get a “10 dollar challenge” where they got to practice buying things from the different food groups.

P: And how is this class different than the one you had done before?

N: It’s different in that it’s over a six-week period, while those other ones it was just an afternoon, so they come in and get an hour or two hour tour and that was it. With this there would be follow up and participants would come in and talk about the recipes and what they’d done at home that was a little healthier. It was exciting seeing people make the commitment and keep coming. There were a good eleven people who did the whole class. I just enjoyed people being excited about cooking and health.

"It was exciting seeing people make the commitment and keep coming.... I just enjoyed people being excited about cooking and health."
-Nickie, CCC Volunteer

P: What is it about Cooking Matters that is meaningful for you and kept you coming back to it?

N: I work in the health care industry and seeing the lack of information given to people by traditional primary care providers about what people can do to improve their health as far lifestyle and food choice goes has been a big driver. I think that prevention needs a little more attention and if they haven't gotten it from their doctor then they can get it from other sources, like Cooking Matters.

P: What were the common questions or misconceptions that folks had?

N: So, some of the things that come up are like, “Why do we have to look at saturated fat?” So, we’ll have a conversation about heart disease and they’ll go, “Oh well, I have some heart problems,” or high blood pressure and that will lead us down the conversation of sodium intake and reading food labels. And they never knew they should look at that part of the food label and they didn’t know that sodium affected their blood pressure significantly. Because their doctor might have said, “Oh, try to cut back on salt,” but they didn’t really understand why or get into a conversation any deeper than that.

P: I think we do hear that a lot, just sort of, “You should eat better.”

N: Yeah, just really generic instructions and there’s not a how you should do that, or why you should do that.

P: Is that something that is part of the Cooking Matters program, more than just “you should,” but this is how this affects your body?

N: Yes! And not just that, but understanding how a recipe works and if you don’t have a recipe, how to take the foods you’re getting at the food pantry or what you’re able to purchase at a low price and how to make that into something healthy and also looking at things like leaving the peels on fruits and vegetables, because that gives you more fiber. And fiber is better for you because it helps prevent cancer and lowers you cholesterol, so these are things we all talk about in the class over the six weeks. Lots of questions, lots of “Oh, I didn’t know that!”

P: Were there any common reasons that folks weren’t always able to access healthy food?

N: I think one of the barriers living in this area is access to healthy food, so purposefully going out of your way to go to the bigger grocery stores to buy fresh produce. That is a big barrier, because it’s easy to just go down to that little convenience store that’s right there.

P: I think that’s something we can all relate to, if it’s hard to fit that time in to your week or you don’t have a car or reliable transit, just valuing food enough to make that time to make that trip and that effort.

N: Yes. And seeing that it’s not a huge hurdle. It can be a hurdle, but we took the bus to Fred Meyer so they got to see that it just took a few minutes.

Another thing that would come up is the kitchens that they have available to them. They would say, “Oh, I don’t have this, I don’t have an oven, I only have a microwave or a hotplate.” So we’d talk about different ways to get around that so you could still have the healthy food and the good options and kind of overcoming not having measuring cups, little things that we take for granted.

P: Were there any stand out moments from the class?

N: I loved the last day when everyone got to come together and talk about what they learned and the recipes that they liked and just got to hang out. I think a bunch of people stayed later and we all took pictures and everyone got a little award and an apron and they just talked about how much they loved it and how they want to take more classes.

The last day we also played food jeopardy. Alison [the lead chef for Cooking Matters] set up this Jeopardy board and prizes, like mixing spoons and things like that they could use, and everyone did so well remembering things like what temperature you need to cook chicken to and what’s the biggest way you can prevent disease or foodborne illness, which was “wash your hands,” which everyone knew.

I got to know some people and the hard things they’ve gone through and what they’ve overcome. And now that they’re getting back in to a stable lifestyle this is something where they can meet people and learn a new skill and take their health into their own hands. I think having something to stick with and to get out and meet people and interact with them was really good for several participants. There was a couple in there too and they used it as their date night. And one of them didn’t like vegetables at all, or only certain vegetables, so it kind of pushed him outside of his comfort zone. And that was cool to see.

P: And what was important about this experience for you?

N: Seeing how resilient people are. It was so neat to get to know people over these six weeks and hearing what they’re going through with their health and illness, rough backgrounds, and the social isolation and they’re just putting themselves out there and working to get better. When I work as a paramedic, I talk to someone for about 15 to 30 minutes, and that’s about it, and I leave them at the hospital, so I don’t really get beyond, “What are you feeling right now?” Working with this population, which I don’t get to do very often, it kind of pushed me beyond my comfort zone in effective communications and how to talk about things that are hard without being biased or offending anyone.

P: And what keeps you coming back to volunteer?

N: It feels so good, people thank you, and hopefully I’ll get to see people on the street now walking around in this area and say hi and catch up and make connections.

P: It’s a great reminder that we’re all in this space together and you can make a connection like that.

"It’s nice to just break it down and just understand that while they have a completely different life from what I have, they are valuable, they are human, and want interactions. We’re all people in this community."

N: Just even walking over here, I try to smile at people on the street when I’m walking by and maybe they don’t get attention or noticed or whatever, so just smiling and saying hi and just watching them be like, “Oh, Hi!” It’s nice to just break it down and just understand that while they have a completely different life from what I have, they are valuable, they are human, and want interactions. We’re all people in this community.

P: And for our traditional last questions, if you met someone who was on the fence about volunteering with CCC, other than that wonderful pitch you just gave to me, what would you tell them?

N: Oh, I mean, even if you just do a little bit I think that seeing other ways of life or confronting things that you have a bias toward or against, it just makes you feel more connected to humanity. It makes you feel more human. And more empathetic. That’s a big, big part of why I’m doing this. It’s so important to interact with people that you don’t normally and do something for another person.

• • •

If reading about Nickie and Cooking Matters inspires you to make a donation of items, we are in need of kitchen supplies to help keep the class going at Central City Concern. Our Cooking Matter Amazon Wish List makes it easy for you donate, or you can contact our Donor Relations Manager, Catharine Hunter at catharine.hunter@ccconcern.org if you have quality used materials from the list that you would like to donate.

And if you are interested in learning more about volunteer positions in at Central City Concern’s health and recovery, housing, or employment programs, contact Peter Russell, CCC’s Volunteer Manager, at peter.russell@ccconcern.org or visit our volunteer webpage.



CCC breaks ground on Blackburn Building that will "bring hope and healing to thousands of people like me"

Nov 07, 2017

CCC President & CEO Rachel Solotaroff, MDMultnomah County District 3 Commissioner Jessica Vega PedersonMetro Councilor Shirley Craddick, District 1
Drew Hammond, Assistant Vice President of Business Development for U.S. BankTricia Tillman, a member of the Oregon Housing and Community Services Housing Stability CouncilMelissa Garcia, National Lending Initiatives Director for the Low Income Investment FundHeather Lyons, Director of the Northwest Region at CSHMike Holevas, a community member who has received services through Central City Concern’s Eastside Concern program and lives in CCC’s supportive housingDavid Russell, President and CEO of Adventist Health Portland
Next

On Monday, Nov. 6, Central City Concern ground onthe Blackburn Building, the last of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations to bring 379 units of affordable housing to Portland.

• • •

Yesterday, Nov. 6, Central City Concern (CCC) broke ground on the third of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations to supportive, affordable housing. CCC also announced the name of the building (25 NE 122nd Ave., Portland)—the Blackburn Building—which honors CCC’s President and CEO Emeritus Ed Blackburn, who recently retired after 26 years at CCC. Ed was instrumental in pulling together the Housing is Health initiative, which was the culmination of years of outstanding leadership and relationship building.

The two-story health care facility will serve 3,000 people each year with recovery and mental health services, as well as targeted primary care services. The clinic will include a pharmacy and 52 units of respite care, including 10 units of palliative care. Additional housing will include 90 units of transitional housing and 34 permanent homes. Integrated resident and health support services will help residents stay housed.

The groundbreaking celebration began at 2 p.m. CCC President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., Multnomah County Commissioner Jessica Vega Pederson and Metro Councilor Shirley Craddick spoke about the new project. Other speakers included Tricia Tillman from Oregon Housing and Community Services, Drew Hammond of US Bank, Melissa Garcia of Low Income Investment Fund and Heather Lyons from Corporation for Supportive Housing.

Community member and CCC client Mike Holevas described his journey from high school science teacher to addict, to a person in recovery working toward wellness and self-sufficiency. He once bought drugs on the very corner where the Blackburn Building will be. “This corner now can be the site where thousands who are suffering—and believe me, we suffer—can come for transformation, healing; families will be restored,” he said. “I’m so proud to be part of something that will bring hope and healing to thousands of people like me."

"This corner now can be the site where thousands who are suffering—and believe me, we suffer—can come for transformation, healing; families will be restored.”
- Mike Holevas, former CCC client

Additional speakers included representatives from the Housing is Health initiative’s six hospitals and health organizations: David Russell, Adventist Health Portland president and CEO; Eric C. Hunter, CareOregon president and CEO; Janet O’Hollaren, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals chief operating officer; Mark Enger, OHSU vice president of Network Operations; Pam Mariea-Nason, Providence Health & Services – Oregon executive, Community Health Division; and George Brown, M.D., Legacy Health president & CEO.

“The Housing is Health collaboration is an excellent example of health systems recognizing the impact housing has on an individual’s health,” said Rachel. “They’ve united for improving health outcomes as well as the common good of our community.”

"[The Housing is Health collaborative has] united for improving health outcomes as well as the common good of our community.”
- Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., CCC President & CEO

The developer is Central City Concern, the architect is Ankrom Moisan, the general contractor is Walsh Construction and the construction manager is GLI.

In addition to the Housing is Health partners, funding for the development of the Blackburn Building is provided by Oregon Housing and Community Services, US Bank, Portland Housing Bureau, CSH, Low Income Investment Fund, Oregon Health Authority, Metro, Energy Trust of Oregon and Multnomah County.

CCC is engaged in a $3.5 million capital campaign to complete funding for the Blackburn Building. Early supporters of this campaign include The Collins Foundation; Downtown Community Housing, Inc. Fund of OCF; Harbourton Foundation; The Hearst Foundations; Meyer Memorial Trust; PGE Foundation; Silvey Family Foundation; The Standard; Wells Fargo Housing Foundation; Building Owners & Managers Association of Oregon; Downtown Development Group; Melvin Mark Companies; Meridian Wealth Advisors; R2C Group; Acme Bader Fund of OCF; Brody Family Charitable Fund; Crooke Family Charitable Fund; Ginny & George Charitable Fund; Mitzvah Fund of OCF; the Paul & Sally McCracken Fund of OCF; and numerous individuals.

Find a full list of contributors to the Housing is Health initiative here.

For more information about the campaign or to make a contribution, please contact Kristie Perry, Director of Donor Relations, at 503-200-3926 or kristie.perry@ccconcern.org.



Downtown Clean & Safe Appreciation Day 2017

Oct 09, 2017

On a crisp, sunny morning in Portland’s Director Park, the Downtown Clean & Safe board members gathered to celebrate the good work of the organization and appreciate some key people.

Clean & Safe board chair, Peter Andrews, welcomed the crowd of about 75 people and shared how the program helps make Portland a walkable city. “Just a few statistics so you can get a feel for how much this program makes a difference in our city,” he said. “In 2016, our cleaners picked up 638 tons of trash, 16,822 needles, cleaned 52,048 biohazards and removed 37,265 graffiti tags. This year we are on track to pick up more than 23,000 needles. Last year, our Sidewalk Ambassadors made 51,532 visitor contacts, making Portland the wonderful and inviting place it is. We also placed all of the twinkly lights up on the trees you see downtown during the holiday season, decorating 750 trees. These numbers speak for themselves. Downtown Clean & Safe is an ongoing advocate for a vital downtown.”

Mayor Ted Wheeler presented the Downtown Champion Award to Central City Concern’s (CCC) President and CEO Emeritus, Ed Blackburn. “Ed’s leadership, passion and compassion have influenced policy and funding at the state and local level,” Mayor Wheeler said, “and has directly impacted the lives of thousands of individuals who struggle with addiction and homelessness.”

“Ed’s leadership, passion and compassion have… directly impacted the lives of thousands of individuals who struggle with addiction and homelessness.”
- Mayor Ted Wheeler

CCC’s President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff then presented two Cleaner of the Year awards to Greg Davis and Matt Carr.

Davis is the lead employee on the Clean & Safe graveyard crew. He came to CCC through Hooper Detoxification Stabilization Center in 2013. He graduated from CCC’s Community Volunteer Corps (CVC), completed a trainee period with Clean & Safe and was hired as a permanent pressure washer in 2015. Two years later, he was promoted to lead worker. “On a daily basis, Greg makes sure the trash is cleaned up, graffiti is removed and that all service calls are completed,” said Solotaroff. “Greg is extremely personable, professional and a fantastic ambassador for Central City Concern and Clean & Safe.”

“Greg is extremely personable, professional and a fantastic ambassador for Central City Concern..."
- Dr. Rachel Solotaroff

Carr, born and raised in New York, and moved to Portland in 1992. He spent the majority of his adult life struggling with addiction. After a few attempts to trying to get clean on his own, he realized he couldn’t do it alone. In June 2016, Matt was accepted into Central City Concern’s Recovery Mentor Program. During this time, Matt successfully completed CVC by spending 80 hours giving back to the community at local non-profits. After his completion of the CVC, he was hired to work as a trainee at Clean & Safe in February 2017.

Right from the start he proved to have an incredibly strong work ethic and the desire to learn and grow in his position. Over the next six months Matt proved to be an extremely reliable and dedicated employee, who was always willing to go above and beyond. Matt showed so much pride in his work, he was promoted to be the third Clean & Safe special projects bicycle cleaner. “Matt’s dedication and hard work has contributed to a higher level of service provided throughout the district,” said Solotaroff. “Matt has repeatedly proven he is an asset and a great ambassador for Central City Concern, Downtown Clean & Safe and everyone who lives, works or visits in the Downtown Portland area.”

Matt proved to be an extremely reliable and dedicated employee, who was always willing to go above and beyond. Matt showed so much pride in his work, he was promoted to be the third Clean & Safe special projects bicycle cleaner.

Andrews then presented the Security Officer of the Year awards Officer Josh Dyk and Officer Samson Blakeslee.

The Portland Downtown Business Improvement District contracts with CCC to keep clean a 213-block area in central downtown and along the bus mall. In six-month trainee positions, CCC Clean & Safe employees remove graffiti, contribute to public safety, and keep downtown free of litter and debris. Clean & Safe hires its employees from CCC's Community Volunteer Corps program.

Toward the end of their six-month work experience, Clean & Safe employees engage in practical, employment development workshops at the Employment Access Center where they also may also access one-on-one assistance in the job search process. Some graduates of Clean & Safe move onto employment at Central City Concern in janitorial, maintenance, pest control and painting roles that maintain CCC’s 23 buildings.



Affordable housing construction begins in East Portland

Sep 19, 2017

Leadership from Housing is Health collaboration health systems visited the construction site of the Stark Street Apartments affordable housing project.Central City Concern, has begun construction on the second of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative—a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health systems in supportive, affordable housing. Health systems leadership visited the Stark Street Apartments site (333 SE 122nd Ave. at Stark St., Portland) on Friday, Sept. 15.

Attendees from the Housing is Health coalition included David Russell (Adventist Health Portland), Eric Hunter (CareOregon), Bill Wiechmann (Kaiser Permanente), Cindy Grueber (OHSU) and Dave Underriner (Providence Health & Services – Oregon). Legacy Health is also part of the Housing is Health coalition. The other two buildings in the Housing is Health initiative are Charlotte B. Rutherford Place (N Interstate Ave.) and the Eastside Health Center (NE 122nd Ave. and E Burnside).

"The health care organizations in the Housing is Health coalition understand that housing for lower income working people is critical to good health outcomes and a healthy community. "
- Ed Blackburn, CCC President & CEO

Stark Street Apartments, opening in 2018, will target people exiting transitional housing programs who have gained employment and seek a permanent home, but still may have barriers to housing. CCC expects to attract potential tenants from the immediate neighborhood. The four-story building contains 153 homes total: 92 one-bedroom and 61 two-bedroom apartments. Rents will range from $412 to $995 per month, depending on Median Family Income.

"These homes are important for supporting employed people with affordable housing. The health care organizations in the Housing is Health coalition understand that housing for lower income working people is critical to good health outcomes and a healthy community, " says Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO.

Stark Street Apartments' major contributors include the Housing is Health coalition of six health organizations: Adventist Health Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services – Oregon. Other major funders are Portland Housing Bureau, Umpqua Bank, US Bank Community Development Corporation, Federal Home Loan Bank and PGE.

The design and development team is Central City Concern, the architect is Ankrom Moisan and the builder is Team Construction.



CCC’s Employment Access Center teams with WorkSource to offer even more services

Sep 04, 2017

Labor Day represents more than just mattress sales, camping and the unofficial start of fall. At Central City Concern (CCC) we celebrate the importance of employment on a person’s path to self-sufficiency. CCC’s Employment Access Center (EAC) offers CCC clients a one-stop employment assistance center with multiple resources including access to computers, the internet, tutorials, personal voicemail, a printer and copier, and telephone and fax services.

In late 2016, WorkSource Portland Metro opened an Express Center at the EAC (2 NW 2nd Ave.) to serve the public. The CCC WorkSource Express Center is open on Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and is staffed by WorkSource employment specialists. So far in 2017, the center has helped about 600 job seekers to engage with training programs, obtain job search assistance including referrals and get help with online applications, document formatting and general questions.

“We are very pleased to host a WorkSource Express Center in our Employment Access Center,” says Clay Cooper, CCC’s director of Social Enterprises and Employment Services. “We want to expand CCC’s employment services to include everyone in the downtown area seeking employment. WorkSource helps us do that, and adds value for our existing clients.”

“We want to expand CCC’s employment services to include everyone in the downtown area seeking employment. WorkSource helps us do that, and adds value for our existing clients.”

Finding a job can be overwhelming, especially for people entering or reentering the workforce after a rough patch in life. CCC’s EAC and WorkSource Express Center has many resources to help. In 2016, the EAC assisted nearly 1,000 job seekers. And every time a client gets a job, he or she rings the bell in the front lobby. It’s the sound of achievement and celebration!



NHCW 2017: Serving a population where they live

Aug 18, 2017

On September 23, 2016, leaders from six Portland health organization gathered at Central City Concern’s Old Town Recovery Center to announce an unprecedented $21.5 million dollar investment in the Housing is Health initiative that will fund three new CCC buildings in Portland. The crown jewel of this shining trio is the Eastside Campus, which will serve medically fragile people and people recovering from substance use disorders and mental illness with a health care clinic and 172 housing units.

“This significant contribution is an excellent example of health organizations coming together for the common good of our community,” said Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO. “It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those who have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes."

Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

CCC will break ground on the Eastside Campus in late October 2017. The center will build on CCC’s existing Eastside Concern program, and will offer integrated housing and clinical services, including substance use disorder treatment, primary care and urgent care. More than 3,000 CCC patients each year will access care in a unique and welcoming health home environment.

The housing portion of the Eastside Campus will have about 172 units of housing, including short-term medical stabilization and palliative beds as well as transitional housing for people in recovery from behavioral health disorders. Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

“It’s important to serve people where they live."

“It’s important to serve people where they live,” said Blackburn. “This project will replicate the integrated care we give at our Old Town campus to help people get back on their feet and achieve health and self-sufficiency.”

The Housing is Health initiative is supported by Adventist Heath Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services. The new construction includes the Eastside Campus, Stark Street Apartments and Charlotte B. Rutherford Place apartments on N Interstate.

The CCC Eastside Campus is scheduled to open in Winter 2019.