Following the Recipe for Health and Community

Dec 20, 2016

''The frittata and the carrot muffins were the favorite thing we made.'' -Stykhead (in red)''I feel more confident that I can leave here with what I learned as we cooked every week.'' -Josh''My favorite thing we made was shepherd's pie. Instead of using a recipe they gave me, I kinda put my own spin on it.'' -Tom (in green)
''The best part was learning, especially how to budget. And you know what? The volunteers… they really, really care. I didn’t think theyd be so personable, but they are. It really touched me.'' -Kristina
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Cooking Matters, a partnership between Central City Concern and the Oregon Food Bank, teaches clients the skills and knowledge required for healthy cooking and eating habits. Click on a photo to begin the slideshow.

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On a sunny Wednesday afternoon in November, the kitchen of Central City Concern’s (CCC) Living Room community space filled with sounds most could recognize as busy food preparation. The rhythmic rocking and knocking of a knife, the hollow echo of water falling on aluminum, the unmistakable crinkling of plastic packaging being opened and emptied, and even the overriding din of playful banter—all there.

Behind that noise? Eight people, all participants and soon-to-be graduates of the six-week Cooking Matters program, a partnership between CCC and the Oregon Food Bank. This was their final session as a group, so they were reveling in the chance to put what they’d learned in the weeks prior to good use. And based on that kitchen banter, they were having a blast doing it—together.

Since their first session, participants had gained a soup-to-nuts education on the skills and knowledge required for healthy cooking and eating habits, including following recipes and meal planning, shopping healthily on a budget and maximizing resources, understanding food labels, and even knife skills and food safety. At the end of each class, they received a grocery bag of food with which they could replicate the course they made that day.

According to CCC Health Educator Kerith Hartmann and Population Health Coordinator Linda Nguyen, the Cooking Matters curriculum can help address a number of issues common among Old Town Clinic (OTC) patients: food insecurity, weight gain, hypertension, coronary issues, and diabetes or pre-diabetes.

In fact, OTC primary care providers had been clamoring for a nutritional guidance program for patients for years and Kerith had often recommended Cooking Matters classes hosted by Oregon Food Bank elsewhere in the community. But the idea to bring the class to patients instead of referring patients out became more and more appealing, and soon enough the need was undeniable. “You wouldn’t necessarily think that there would be a cooking class based out of a medical clinic, but it makes so much sense, especially for the people we’re working with,” says Kerith.

With Oregon Food Bank on board to pilot a Cooking Matters class at CCC starting in late spring 2016, it was off to the races to find participants.

Approximately half of the Cooking Matters participants were identified and referred by their OTC primary care providers based on their medical histories and the level of engagement with their care. Because Cooking Matters builds on each week of curriculum, patients who showed an active engagement in their own care would benefit most.

Other participants were recruited through CCC’s Housed+Healthy initiative, which coordinates services between CCC supportive housing services and CCC’s health care programs. The work Housed+Healthy staff members do within the walls of CCC housing allows them to show clients that Cooking Matters is well worth attending, even if that means showing up at their doors prior to a session and walking with them to the Living Room.

“People living in our housing are inherently good candidates to benefit from Cooking Matters,” says Permanent Housing Manager, Dana Schultz. “They’re living in low-income housing, so they have budget restrictions and limited cooking resources. On average, people living in our housing are about 59 years old, which is when you see a prevalence of chronic conditions that can be managed through diet.”

Dana adds, “Plus, people who live in low-income housing have to be proactive about combating social isolation daily.”

Knowing that, the sounds heard in the Living Room kitchen take on a slightly different meaning. Those aren’t just the clatterings of making a meal. It’s the sound of people—all some combination of vulnerable, unwell, or isolated—coming together as the ingredients of community. Over the course of six weeks, they’ve encountered unfamiliar ingredients, learned new skills, grown in confidence, and broken bread—literally—together. They’re not shy about talking of this community aspect, either.

Tom, a Cooking Matters participant, says, “My favorite thing was being around these people and being able to cook something with different people around and eating together.”

Another participant, Stykhead, says, “The camaraderie here is great. Getting together and thinking of how we can cook better for ourselves. It gives a whole new outlook on how to cook.”

For Josh, Cooking Matters helped her extend community to her home. “I was able to share the food I made with my housemates.”

Though Cooking Matters at CCC has only completed two cohorts, stories of the program’s impact can start filling up a small cookbook. One patient lost enough weight to get a surgery she needed. Another participant loved learning how to make burritos so much that he not only stacked his freezer with them, but also gave them out to friends. Yet another made a lasagna for her neighbors. A few participants who lived in the same building developed a friendship during the program and held potlucks after they graduated.

Kristina, a participant in this latest cohort, says, “I can actually do a prepared meal on a regular basis. Before this preparing meals felt so tedious and hard to do. But now I have a plan in my head and it happens.” She pauses and lifts her chin up proudly. “And my son likes it.”

“I learned a lot as far as being able to buy healthy,” Stykhead shares. “It’s nowhere near as hard as I thought it was.”

Based on the popularity of Cooking Matters, Oregon Food Bank has committed to bringing the program to CCC for three more sessions through 2017. Their partnership, which includes providing additional volunteers, the curriculum, and all of the food used during each class, has been extraordinary, says Kerith.

Incorporating Cooking Matters into CCC helps send clients and patients on a trajectory to a better quality of life, Linda says. Participants have secured housing; with Cooking Matters, they are working their way toward securing health and moving toward overall wellness.

“It’s a joy to watch people’s faces light up when they try a new vegetable they love or even hate. At the end of the day, they get to enjoy a meal with people they like. And having that group of people to do this with compels them to believe that they can make all these skills a part of their daily life.”



What's 100,000 Hours Good For? One CCC Program Knows.

Nov 16, 2016

Popular belief says that it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill. What, then, does 100,000 hours allow you to do?

At Central City Concern’s (CCC) Community Volunteer Corps (CVC) program, those hours have been used to change people, provide hope, and make a wide impact on the Portland community through volunteerism. And on Wednesday, November 9, the CCC community gathered to celebrate the 100,000 total hours of volunteer service CVC participants have contributed over the last seven years, during which people affected by homelessness, addictions, or past criminality have gained work experience while giving back.

“What’s taken us so long?”
On what many remember as the rainiest day in April 2009, a 15-seat passenger van pulled into Irving Park in Northeast Portland. Twelve people—each recently housed by Central City Concern, engaged in CCC’s addiction recovery services, and unemployed (or, depending on who you asked, unemployable)—piled out wearing waterproof boots and plastic ponchos. At the direction of Portland Parks & Recreation, they quickly got to work pulling weeds and raking leaves in the downpour.

        

A blown-up photo that hangs in the CVC conference room commemorates this ragtag group, the first of hundreds that would contribute volunteer work all over Portland. Since then, CVC has brought work crews to an astounding range of local nonprofits, including organizations like Meals on Wheels, Habitat for Humanity, Free Geek, ReBuilding Center, and Oregon Food Bank. In all, CVC has partnered with 32 total organizations.

The idea for CVC grew out of a conversation Central City Concern Executive Director, Ed Blackburn, had with his father in 2008. Because it was the height of the Great Recession, his father reminisced about his experiences as a young man during the Great Depression. Much to Ed’s surprise, his father told him of the time he was arrested for burglary, and given two options by the judge: spend time in jail, or join the Civilian Conservation Corps, a program created during the Great Depression that put young men back to work.

He opted for the latter. His time there, Ed’s father told him, “changed his life. Saved his life. It taught him to appreciate teamwork and to do something good together with others. It prepared him for work in the long run. He learned skills and work ethic.”

Ed knew that many people arriving in Central City Concern’s addiction recovery and mental health programs, particularly those who had experienced great hardship on the street, had an intense passion to help people and to give back, even when they didn’t necessarily have the tools to do so. He also knew that they had a lot of time on their hands. So after hearing about how the Civilian Conservation Corps helped his father develop a foundation to be productive the rest of his life, Ed wondered if CCC could do something similar.


Several conversations with employees in recovery and meetings with potential funders later, the Community Volunteer Corps was ready to take that first van full of volunteers to Irving Park.

“The one thing I heard from everyone was, ‘What’s taken us so long?’” Ed recalled.

Participation in the Community Volunteer Corps gives CCC clients an opportunity to ease their transition into the workforce and increases their self-confidence. Volunteer projects—pulling ivy, painting over graffiti, recycling computers, building homes for needy families, beautifying parks, and so much more—give participants an outlet to be productive in tangible ways during a time when their recovery demands intensive self-work and self-care.

Furthermore, a common refrain among participants is that CVC allows them to “give back” to the community they feel they hurt or took away from while active in their addiction.

When clients enroll in CVC, they make a commitment to the program. But perhaps more importantly, they make a commitment to their future. During an average of two to four months, participants carve out time between recovery meetings, appointments, and other obligations to volunteer a total of 80 hours with CVC. During that time, they develop soft skills that are foundational to permanent employment: showing up on time, getting along with others, following directions, practicing good work habits, and following through on commitments.


Every other month, the Central City Concern community gathers to celebrate those who recently completed their 80 hours. At the ceremony, each graduate receives photos from their time with CVC, a certificate of completion, and a letter of recommendation they can attach to their future resumes.

Permission to Believe
Since that rainy April day, 1,600 people have participated in the Community Volunteer Corps. Of them, 1,001 have completed their 80-hour commitments to the program.

Hundreds of journeys have started with the growth and encouragement afforded by the CVC experience. After graduating, participants find themselves ready and qualified for permanent employment, a position that may have felt impossible just months prior. Graduates have gone on to become hired as maintenance workers, construction workers, truck drivers, real estate brokers, and even counselors.

Still, the CVC program is more than just a chance to develop marketable skills. Through shared van rides with work crews, conversations with CVC staff members who serve as mentors, and the simple act of doing something to benefit someone else, participants rebuild their self-worth and make amends to their community.

“It was so huge for me to get outside of myself and help someone else,” a graduate shared on Wednesday.

As a milestone, 100,000 hours, like each CVC graduation ceremony, feels final. But as anyone who has gone through the program will tell you, CVC is—more than anything—about building toward something bigger. Participants can dare to define their futures by possibility and potential rather than their past mistakes.

“Completing CVC gave me permission to believe that I could succeed,” another new graduate said.

Every day, Central City Concern engages people who are finding stability and looking to give back and get better. Because of them, the Community Volunteer Corps has no plans to stop at 100,000 hours, or 1,001 graduates, or 32 partners. There’s too much potential out there.

 

 



Six health care organizations partner with CCC

Oct 11, 2016

We are so excited about our new collaboration with six Oregon healthcare organizations that was announced on September 23. Adventist Health, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services are joining together to invest $21.5 million in a unique partnership to respond to Portland’s urgent challenges in affordable housing, homelessness and healthcare. This unprecedented collaboration has gained national attention.

The investment will support 382 new housing units across three locations, including one with an integrated health center in Southeast Portland.

Governor Kate Brown said, "This project reflects what we've known for a long time -- health begins where we live, learn, work, and play. Stable, affordable housing and health care access are so often intertwined, and I’m gratified to see collaborative solutions coming from some of our state’s leading organizations. I applaud the efforts of all those involved and am grateful for the partnership in moving Oregon forward and making ours a home where each Oregonian thrives."

"It’s exciting that health care providers recognize the deep connection between housing and health care," said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. "This is exactly the kind of collaboration that our community needs during this housing crisis. None of us can solve homelessness alone. But this collaboration will change hundreds of lives at a critical time of need."

Eastside Health Center will serve medically fragile people and people in recovery from addictions and mental illness with a first-floor clinic and housing for 176 people. The center will also become the new home for an existing Central City Concern program, Eastside Concern, and will offer 24-hour medical staffing on one floor.

Stark Street Apartments in East Portland will provide 155 units of workforce housing.

Interstate Apartments in North Portland will provide 51 units designed for families. It is part of Portland’s North/Northeast Neighborhood Housing Strategy to help displaced residents return to their neighborhood.

This significant contribution is an excellent example of healthcare organizations coming together for the common good of our community. It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those that have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes. This housing will remain affordable for generations and it couldn’t come at a better time.

"Health and home go hand-in-hand," said Nan Roman, President and CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness. "This is a breakthrough collaboration with the health care community and a partnership that has the potential to change the landscape of how we can end homelessness in this country."

Though the health care organizations' contributions are significant, CCC will finance the remainder of the costs, about $37 million, through tax credits, loans and fundraising. Our upcoming capital campaign is an opportunity for everyone to contribute to this project.

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About Housing is Health: The Housing is Health network supports innovative approaches to housing and healthcare in the Portland region.

Learn more at www.centralcityconcern.org/announcement and join the conversation on social media at #HousingisHealth.

See photos from the press conference.

News articles:

- New York Times (AP)
- The Oregonian
- KGW
- OPB



A Study on the Service Coordination Team Impact: Key Findings

Aug 03, 2016

We are pleased to share this recent study on Portland Police Bureau’s Service Coordination Team (SCT). Central City Concern has been a partner on this program since 2005, providing housing and more recently, also recovery services for approximately 150 people each year. Central City Concern’s Housing Rapid Response and CCC Recovery Center programs have contributed to the success of SCT and we have greatly valued our partnership as we strive to bring stability and well-being to those in need.

• • •

Study of the Service Coordination Team and its influence on chronic offenders
Research and report by: Portland State University Capstone Class
UNST 421 Section 572 (Winter Term 2016)

The Service Coordination Team (SCT) is a collaboration between law enforcement and social service agencies to provide housing and day treatment to individuals to help them reduce future arrests. The program is designed to reduce drug-related property crimes and stop the cycle of crime and addiction by providing treatment opportunities for chronic offenders who have not succeeded using traditional treatment methods.

This PSU study analyzed 82 participants in 2014. Here are the key findings:

Participants:

- The average age of the participants was 44 years old.
- 80 percent were male; 20 percent female.
- 61 percent were white, 30 percent were African-American, nearly 5 percent were Latino, and about 4 percent were Native-American.

Completion group:

- 20 people fell within the scope of the data.
- The group had nearly an 88 percent total reduction in police contact
- Total: 84 police contacts total

- 72 contacts pre-program
- 9 contacts post-program
- 3 contacts while in the program

Conclusions:

- Participating in SCT, even without completing the program, is beneficial. Seventy-four percent of participants at least 30 days in the program had reduced arrests after leaving; 40 percent had no arrests.
- All participants who completed the program were happy with it. The most common reason is the program encourages independent responsibility and individualism.
- Costs without SCT:

- Per crime: $2,046
- Drug use: $601 per person/week
- Arrest/defense counsel: $6,098 per arrest
- Jail: $170 per day

- Working with 2014 participants, every dollar spent on SCT saved $7.35 in victim, community and system costs



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: JVC Volunteer Justin

Jul 26, 2016

Justin Willis has known since adolescence that he would commit his life to serving those less fortunate than he.

“Both of my parents are in education, which lends itself to social justice,” says Willis, now age 26. “They encouraged me to do social justice work from a young age.”

While still a middle school and high school student in Federal Way, Washington, Willis participated in service learning projects through his church, working with migrant farmers in Bellingham, helping out in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, and working with poor families in Mexico.

As an undergraduate at Seattle University (SU), a school he chose in large part because of its commitment to social justice, Willis taught math to students in a nearby elementary school where 96 percent of students live in poverty.

Willis studied biology and general sciences at SU, in preparation for medical school. He knew that he wanted to do a year of service before applying to med school, but he wasn’t sure where. When a former SU student came back to campus and gave a talk about his experiences as a Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest volunteer with Central City Concern’s Recuperative Care Program (RCP), Willis knew he had found a match.

“I thought ‘this is exactly what I want to do,’” Willis recalls, “work with homeless people in a sort of medical setting.”

In addition to the opportunity to work at RCP, Willis was excited about living with seven other like-minded individuals in a JVC Northwest house and walking through their volunteer journey together.

Willis worked as a patient liaison with RCP in 2012-13, helping clients navigate the health care system, interviewing them at the hospital, getting them established at CCC’s Old Town Clinic, moving them into the RCP facility and helping them transition from there into more permanent housing. He also held weekly case-management drop-in sessions to support patients once they left RCP.

Willis admits that one of the biggest initial challenges of working at RCP was his naivety about people who are experiencing homelessness in their daily lives.

“I came in wanting to make a difference and it was tough when that didn’t happen. I really had to understand that changes come slowly and in small steps,” he says.

As the year progressed, Willis did learn to appreciate the positive changes he and the staff at RCP helped their patients make, such as moving into transitional or permanent housing. He says that the entire RCP community was genuinely affected when good things happened.

Now a third-year student at University of Washington School of Medicine, Willis has continued his commitment to serving low-income communities. In his first two years of medical school, he volunteered and worked as clinic lead at Aloha Inn in Seattle, which provides housing to formerly homeless people. This year he made sure to get rotations in areas with impoverished populations, including one in rural Wyoming and another at Harborview Hospital in Seattle, a Level One Trauma Center serving five states.

Willis plans to go into pediatrics, working with underserved children and their parents to help prevent the adverse childhood events that are most likely to lead to drug use, poverty and homelessness.

Wherever he ends up, Willis will take with him many profound experiences from his days at RCP.

He says, “I learned the importance of not judging and not having preconceived notions about anyone I interact with. By far the most rewarding aspect was just being in the RCP building and talking to patients and hearing the path they had in their lives. Everyone there has incredible stories.”

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Don't forget to visit our other JVC Volunteer Spotlights!

   



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: JVC Volunteer Carissa

Jul 26, 2016

A few patients gather in the common room of the old building, reading newspapers or grabbing sodas from the vending machine. A man in a wheelchair rolls in, while another takes up his post at a seat in the hallway. Carissa Marston greets them all by name, checking in with each as she makes her way upstairs.

Marston is a case manager with Central City Concern’s Recuperative Care Program (RCP), one of several CCC programs housed in downtown Portland’s historic Henry Building. She first joined the RCP in 2013 as a member of Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest and was hired a year later as a paid staff member.

Before Marston came to RCP, she had never worked with homeless or medically vulnerable adults, but she brought with her skills learned as a resident assistant in her college dorm in Louisiana.

“I had some experience in crisis management and responding to emergencies on the fly. Things usually go smoothly at RCP on a day-to-day basis, but I’ve found that my calm demeanor can be useful here,” Marston says.

One significant aspect of her job is screening new referrals made by area hospitals and social workers, ensuring that arriving patients will be a good fit for the program. All new patients must be able to perform daily living activities independently and have an acute need that can be resolved, Marston says.

“We’re not trying to screen people out,” Marston adds. “We’re trying to screen people in. We always think about how we can tweak the program to be more successful.”

Marston, one of five full-time caseworkers, begins her rounds each morning with juice and granola bars as a “peace offering” for waking up her patients. Throughout the day, she helps them get to medical and counseling appointments, and also helps prepare them for life after RCP. Most patients stay in the program for two to six weeks.

The 24 year old, who grew up outside of New Orleans, says that the learning curve at CCC was fast and furious, especially since she started the job soon after graduating from college.

“It was mind-blowing and eye-opening in every way,” Marston admits. One of the most important skills she’s learned over the years is how to communicate with patients, as well as how to communicate with those who don’t work in similar fields.

Living with four other people, all of whom have volunteered with JVC Northwest in the past, helps her deal with the intensity of the job. “It’s good to have that kind of audience,” Marston says.

The work has also been invigorating for her. Marston had long been considering a career in medicine, but was reluctant to make a commitment without experience.

“I’ve really enjoyed being here, at the borderline between medical care and social services. And I’ve had some really great mentors at Old Town Clinic,” she says.

At the end of the summer, Marston will be leaving the Northwest to start a three-year physician assistant program at Duke University in North Carolina, but she hopes to return to Portland when she earns her degree. Her dream job? A position with CCC, right back where she started.

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Don't forget to visit our other JVC Volunteer Spotlights!

       



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: JVC Volunteer Amanda

Jul 26, 2016

Getting into a recovery program. Making it to medical appointments. Finding housing. These are just some of the life-changing steps that Amanda Foggia, patient liaison with Central City Concern’s Recuperative Care Program (RCP), sees her patients taking. For Foggia, witnessing patients achieve goals they once thought impossible is her job’s biggest pay-off.

“Moving someone into their own apartment, seeing them get their own keys, is one of the best things we do, “ says Foggia, who is in her second year as an RCP volunteer through Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest. “My mindset of success has changed dramatically since coming here.”

Originally from outside of Albany, New York, Foggia attended Fordham University, where she studied psychology. At Fordham, she also got her first exposure to the Jesuit philosophies of social justice and service work. She participated in several service immersion programs during her undergraduate years, traveling to India twice to work in orphanages and a home for sick women founded by Mother Teresa. She also worked with underserved populations in Montana and Colorado while still a student.

After graduating from Fordham, Foggia considered various volunteer positions around the country. She liked the urban locale of RCP, as well as the warm reception she got from JVC Northwest. She began working at RCP in the summer of 2014 and found it so rewarding that she signed on for a second year.

Foggia’s main responsibilities include determining who is eligible for the program and helping patients ranging in age from 18 to 86 meet their goals, from staying off drugs and alcohol to finding employment and reconnecting with family members.

She says that, initially, she spent a lot of time observing patients and other staff members, learning how to work with a population with which she had little experience.

“It’s an intense and challenging place,” Foggia says, “and at times it can feel overwhelming. You have to figure out how to stay fresh and positive.”

Living in a house in North Portland with seven other JVC Northwest volunteers has provided Foggia with much-needed moral support, but communal living also comes with challenges. She and her housemates hold weekly meals, household business meetings and spirituality nights. They also make all household decisions, such as how to spend their limited stipend for groceries, communally.

“The reward has been getting to witness my own personal growth and the growth of the people I’m living with. Also learning how to love people even if we don’t see eye to eye or have completely different views on things,” Foggia says.

RCP has expanded rapidly in the past year since winning a Health Care Innovation Award and being included in a national study on health care for the homeless. According to Foggia, better partnerships and increased awareness at local hospitals have also fueled the program’s growth, with referrals rising from an average of 17 per month to 29 per month.

All of this has added to Foggia’s own learning experiences. She says, “From the volunteer side it’s a unique position. You get to see so many things, it’s an opportunity to see the whole wrap-around services.

“Working at RCP has been a really great learning experience,” she adds. “It gets me out of my bubble.”

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Don't forget to visit our other JVC Volunteer Spotlights!

   



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: JVC Anniversary Edition

Jul 26, 2016

Volunteers are the backbone of Central City Concern, and many relationships are lasting. Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest and CCC are celebrating a 10-year partnership through CCC’s Recuperative Care Program (RCP) in downtown Portland, Oregon.

Jeanne Haster, JVC Northwest executive director, says the partnership was a natural fit from the very beginning, when CCC launched the program in 2005. “Their initial request was for a volunteer for three years to help them get the program up and running, but the need is so great and we have so many volunteers in Portland who want to work with the homeless, that we’re still there,” says Haster.

Jordan Wilhelms, Complex Care Program Manager for CCC, works closely with the volunteers. He enjoys supporting them as they take on new roles and challenges, and learn how to maintain their morale in an often intense environment. According to Wilhelms, the relationship between RCP and JVC Northwest has been rewarding for volunteers, patients and staff members alike.

The current JVC Northwest volunteer, Amanda Foggia ends her second year of service with RCP this month; the new volunteer, Kaitlyn Stettnichs starts her year of service with RCP on August 17.

Other JVC Northwest volunteers who have worked at RCP include Megan Hurley (2006-07), Kathryn Leiher (2007-08), Kaitlin Shorrock (2008 -09), Lizzie McQuillan (2009-10), Michael Alston (2010-11), Maggie Wright (2011-12), Justin Willis (2012-13), and Carissa Marston (2013-14).

Our Monthly Volunteer Spotlight feature for July will actually be three profiles, each focusing on a current or past JVC volunteer. Click on a photo below to learn more about the amazing volunteers CCC has had the great privilege of working with for the last ten years!

   



Town Center Courtyards Is Keeping Families Together

Jul 25, 2016

Amber L. is absolutely over the moon. The 27-year-old mom is moving back to Clackamas, Ore., where she grew up, into a brand new apartment. “I am so happy to be coming back with my son to a safe, beautiful home,” she told the crowd of close to 100 people who attended the grand opening of Town Center Courtyards on Wednesday, July 20.

Town Center Courtyards will become a stable, supportive home for families who are homeless or vulnerable to homelessness. The 60-unit, mixed-income apartment complex is a shining example of form and function. All the units have exterior doors and overlook courtyards where families can socialize and kids can play. The apartments are spacious and bright. There will be two Central City Concern (CCC) staff members on-site to help residents with life skills, employment, educational development, recovery, parenting and wellness support. The neighborhood is well located near public transportation, public schools, public parks, child care centers, grocery stores and numerous employment opportunities.

CCC Family Housing has served more than 1,000 families since 2000. Just last year, our Family Housing program served 122 families that included 189 children:

- 75 kids were able to stay with their families and avoid foster care.
- 79 of those families were able to find permanent housing.
- 30 of the parents found employment and 20 entered school. One parent even graduated from college.

But clients can wait as long as six months to access family housing. Town Center Courtyards will add 60 units (20 one-bedroom, one-bath; 32 two-bedrooms, one-bath; 8 three-bedrooms, 1.5 bath) to CCC’s existing 92 units of family housing.

Town Center Courtyards was completed on time and ahead of schedule. Families should start moving in during August. This is just one of several CCC affordable housing projects moving forward this summer.

Town Center Courtyards is the result of robust collaboration between CCC, Clackamas County, Oregon Housing & Community Services and U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation, as well as many foundations and individual donors. These partners are providing the opportunity for families to have a safe, affordable place to call home.

During the grand opening, Clackamas County Commissioner Martha Schrader, Director of Clackamas County Housing & Community Development Chuck Robbins, Director of Oregon Housing & Community Services Claire Seguin, Vice-president of U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation Ann Melone, and CCC’s Senior Director of Housing and Recovery Support Services Sharon Fitzgerald all spoke of the importance of supporting the community by providing affordable housing in which families can thrive.

Amber says she was filled with gratitude when she cut the ribbon to officially open Town Center Courtyards. “Thank you for making my dream come true," she said.



Restaurant Depot: 2016 “Opening Doors" Employer of the Year

Jul 14, 2016

On July 13, Central City Concern held its seventh annual Employment Access Center celebration to honor more than a dozen clients for their exceptional diligence and success in the employment process over the past year. The EAC also recognized two Portland-area employers—Washman Car Washes and Restaurant Depot—for their superlative commitments to helping individuals find stable employment and attain self-sufficiency.

Restaurant Depot was honored as the “Opening Doors” Employer of the Year for their “commitment to giving those with high barriers to employment an opportunity to thrive.” Learn more about Restaurant Depot below!

• • •

Anyone who works in a Portland restaurant knows about Restaurant Depot. This cash-and-carry warehouse offers one-stop shopping to Portland’s ever-expanding food service industry. Shoppers will find fresh meat, poultry, seafood and produce; dairy products; a huge variety of frozen and canned foods; beverages; bakery supplies; catering supplies; cleaning supplies; and food service equipment.

Restaurant Depot has been an extremely supportive partner of CCC’s Employment Access Center (EAC) for more than five years, hiring five to 10 people annually. Most people work out; one CCC referral has been there five years and became the union shop steward.

Dan Williams (pictured here), Restaurant Depot’s branch manager, appreciates working with the EAC because they do such a great job identifying people who will be a good fit with the company, and likely to stay. “We like giving people a chance,” he says. “A lot of people make mistakes but it’s important to get them a job and get them out of that rut so they can improve their lives.”

Dan says people from CCC work hard and are likely to stick around. The EAC also helps him solve hiring struggles and remain fully staffed.

“It’s a great partnership,” he says.