Seva: The Act of Selfless Service

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

As Central City Concern celebrates National Volunteer Week by highlighting our volunteer partnership with Living Yoga, we thought it imperative to hear from them directly. Avery Lewis, Living Yoga’s Events and Communications Manager, was gracious enough to write a guest blog post on the organization’s behalf in which she shares how trauma-informed yoga aligns with the needs of those CCC serves, how Living Yoga’s own volunteers are transformed by their service, and much more.

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In honor of volunteer week, we want to recognize the 130+ volunteers who selflessly dedicate their time and energy to teach trauma-informed yoga at our partner sites every year, including Central City Concern’s Letty Owing Center, Hooper Detox, and Old Town Clinic. At these sites alone, 24 Living Yoga volunteers have practiced yoga with more than 900 students in the past twelve months.

In yoga, some refer to this act of selfless service as seva. Seva is the Sanskrit word used to describe an action in which we selflessly give of ourselves to promote the well-being of others. Perhaps the most beautiful thing about seva is that, more often than not, the one serving and the one served both benefit. This is something Living Yoga volunteers experience time and time again when working with students at our partner sites.

Greg, who teaches weekly at Hooper Detox, says, “My experience at Hooper has helped me grow and connect not only as a yoga teacher, but also as a human. I am always impressed by the attitudes of the students and staff—I love their authenticity and gratitude. I feel invited to causally express myself in my teaching, just as I invite the students to do so through their breath and movement. I have fun when I teach yoga at Hooper, and the students appear to enjoy themselves as well. Their occasional contributions of light-hearted banter, sighs of relief, and brief anecdotes help create a relaxed and comfortable atmosphere.”

Living Yoga’s partnership with Central City Concern over the past nine years has played an integral role in the healing process and resiliency of our students. By offering trauma-informed yoga classes, students learn to create positive change from the inside out. Trauma-informed yoga acknowledges that trauma can cause individuals to feel unsafe and disconnected from their bodies. Practicing trauma-informed yoga allows the individual to reconnect with their body, increase self-knowledge, and create a safe place within themselves. It’s a powerful tool for recovery and for life in general.

Through the practice of yoga, students gain valuable skills that support their ability to realize their full potential. Students find themselves using these skills outside the classroom, contributing to their own long term well-being and to the health and well-being of the communities in which they live. Jillian, a Living Yoga volunteer teacher at Letty Owings Center, reported, “Another great class! Again these women are so open and ready for yoga. We talked a little about the classes they’ve done so far—one woman said she couldn’t sleep the other night so she got out of bed and did yoga to relax! It’s like textbook Living Yoga—awesome! It is really landing with them, and it feels so great to be part of their yoga journey.” 

Yoga is such a deeply transformational practice to share with someone. It promotes self-love, self-respect, forgiveness, healing, confidence, and growth. It teaches us compassion and how to communicate with heart and intention. And it has a ripple effect! When we realize the inherent goodness inside of ourselves, we learn to act and interact from that place with others. We learn that we are more than our worst behaviors.

For the volunteer teachers at Living Yoga, it is clear that the sharing of this experience through yoga is as satisfying, if not more so, as the practice of yoga itself.