CCC Celebrates National Health Center Week 2016!

Monday, August 08, 2016

“We choose to go to the moon … not because it is easy, but because it is hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win.”

President John F. Kennedy’s famous speech at Rice University in September 1962 captured the tone of the United States. It was a time of extraordinary innovation, responding to deep and complex societal problems. Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society initiative brought us education reform and the earliest roots of community health centers, which we celebrate this week during National Health Center Week. Civil rights leaders like Malcolm X, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and Medgar Evers, among many others, led the movement against Jim Crow and socially and legally institutionalized racism. Stonewall birthed a new age of LGBTQ activism, while second-wave feminism brought us Titles IX and X and a sea change in societal attitudes toward women.

Today, we face a different but no less daunting set of social ills. Homelessness and poverty, along with the deeply entrenched social and economic disparities that drive them, are problems of such breadth and depth that they can seem immovable. Social planners and others talk about the concept of wicked problems, not merely hard problems that can be solved with enough resources and time, but deeply complex and interdependent problems with no clear causes or easy solutions. Wicked problems challenge us to think with creativity and clarity, to work collaboratively, and to be willing to try harder every day. They are problems of such scale and urgency that we can do no less than bring our very best.

At Central City Concern, our 800 employees, together with the 10,000 people we are privileged to serve every year and our many community partners, are deeply motivated by the wicked problems of homelessness and poverty: challenges that cannot be postponed and must be won. Working with limited resources to solve problems that may seem unsolvable, rather than being Sisyphean, inspires (and requires) us to innovate every day.

In celebration of National Health Center Week, we are profiling Central City Concern staff, patients, and programs within our Federally Qualified Health Center sites who are working to develop innovative and thoughtful solutions to the complex problems we face in community health work. These profiles represent some of the best of what our organization has to offer. I challenge you all to address your problems, no matter how great or small, with the strength of innovation.

Leslie Tallyn
Chief Clinical Operations Officer

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Visit These Profiles of Innovation at Central City Concern!