Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: January 2017 Edition

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Our first Volunteer Spotlight of 2017 highlights the unique role of Dr. John Bishop, a clinician who has chosen to spend time in Old Town Clinic’s Wound Care Clinic. As the Wound Care Clinic program is in its relative infancy, our lead practitioner, Pat Buckley, had this to say about Dr. Bishop’s contributions:

“Having his expertise as we were developing the program was extremely beneficial because it really helped us ramp up the quality of care more quickly than we otherwise would have been able to… He’s the bomb.”

If you’d like to learn more about Old Town Clinic’s Wound Care program we recommend you check out the National Health Care for the Homeless’s Healing Hands newsletter, where they highlight this young, yet valuable, Old Town Clinic service. In the meantime, take a look below to find out both what distinctive challenges Dr. Bishop encounters while at Old Town Clinic, but also what makes the care process so rewarding to him.

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Name and Volunteer Position: John Bishop, provider in the Wound Care Clinic of Old Town Clinic.

How long have you been volunteering with us?
About year and a half now; it’s been very positive. It’s a different kind of wound care than I was used to, a different kind of situation, but it’s been very positive. Good, nice, qualified people to work with... pleasant, friendly. I like the patients, too. The patients, for the most part, are very nice.

What made you want to volunteer at Central City Concern?
I decided to be retired. And moving to Oregon from Florida there was no real employment for me, financially, in a semi-retired level. I spent many years learning how to do wound care and I didn’t want to just give up that knowledge overnight. It took a long time to develop what I know and I didn’t want to just throw it away so I figured I could use what I know positively for a few more years. And since I don’t get paid, I’d rather take care of people who can’t pay [Note: All Old Town Clinic patients are on a sliding scale fee.] They need the care and there’s no reason why they shouldn’t get it.

Have there been any surprises at Old Town Clinic so far?
Well, the biggest problem I have here is with continuity of care and follow-up. Part of it is me as I only volunteer but two times a week, but part of it is the patients that don’t come back. That’s probably the biggest disappointment.

Then again, that’s the challenge from which we have to work. That’s what’s different from my civilian or private practice before I got here. That’s just one of those things in the practice of medicine.

Have you tried strategies to combat that?
Well it does direct how we administer our care. We have to prescribe a type of care with the assumption that maybe the patient won’t come back. That way, if they don’t, they’re not going to get themselves into more trouble from the care. My philosophy is to be positive, develop a little relationship with them, and have them feel like I’m expecting them so that they might feel more of an obligation from that. I make sure to say “I will see you next week!” and I hope they think, “If he cares enough to be there to look for me I ought to show up.” I don’t know if that’s how it works but that’s my goal.

I like doing wound care, I like taking care of people, and I like seeing wounds get well. It’s a very satisfying thing to start off with a mess and then see the patient eventually walk out and to tell them, “Don’t come back, you’re all done!" And along the way, since many wounds are chronic, there’s a big effort to teach the patient how to take care of it themselves so that they won’t have to come back. I don’t know how successful I am with that but it’s always been my guiding light in wound care. It’s  "Okay, this is what I want to do; if it happens again, this is what you can do for yourself.”

Having practiced medicine at Old Town Clinic, if somebody were on the fence about volunteering here is there anything you would want them to know?
Well I think the volunteering business is pretty nice. The state of Oregon has their physician emeritus program that kind of gives you liability coverage and allows you to practice and keep your skills alive. It lets you use the skills you already have and I think more physicians ought to consider that.

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If you are a licensed practitioner interested in volunteering time with Portland’s vulnerable populations, we recommend checking out the Coalition for Community Health Clinics, a community and care-driven collaborative (of which Old Town Clinic is a partner).

For any other Central City Concern volunteer inquiries, please visit our volunteer webpage.