A Room Full of Furry Faces

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

The following was written by Bonnie Suba, who provides security at our Old Town Clinic, about Kally Stark, a phlebotomist who serves patients at OTC.

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For a couple of years now, I have been the security officer at the Old Town Clinic. I provide safety and security for both staff and patients, as well as visitors. I complete rounds during closing of regular business hours and meet and greet staff that are finishing up for the day. I usually will come upon some staff members that are committed to finishing the day’s tasks no matter the quitting time. I usually peek my head in the doorway and inquire if everything is okay or anything needed. This brings me to the purpose of me sharing this story.

A few months ago, as I was doing my regular rounds of the clinic, I was checking the second floor and noticed that Kally was still in her lab. Kally is a phlebotomist and works in a small room without windows. I can see Kally from the doorway, but I do not enter the lab because I find that the lab is private, being that blood or bodily fluids are being removed from someone. I find this to be very private in nature and usually an anxiety-filled moment. Therefore, sometimes I just signal her a “thumbs up” and she gives me a “thumbs up” in response, acknowledging that she is fine and soon to be going home.

However, this one day, I decided to step into her laboratory to speak to her. When I stepped into her lab, I was captivated by all the black and white pictures of dogs and cats and a rabbit and possibly a squirrel that lined her walls in the laboratory. I asked Kally where she got all these pictures of these animals. She told me that most of them were photos of her client’s pets. She explained to me that most of the patients come into the lab and are already highly anxious about coming into the clinic and even more so the lab. She shared with me that many clients have little more than their pets. Having pictures of their pets on the walls eases their anxiety and makes the process more personal than clinical for the patient.

She shared with me that many clients have little more than their pets. Having pictures of their pets on the walls eases their anxiety and makes the process more personal than clinical for the patient.

There were 8x10 pictures lining the walls and another wall behind the door where some of the staff’s canines and felines. Kally stood there and told me the names of the pets on the wall and about some of the clients that owned them. I felt a personal touch and peacefulness when Kally was explaining all the pictures and how she wanted her clients to feel less anxious while being in the world in which she works—drawing blood.

While the placing of photos of canines and felines may seem small and insignificant, they have a comforting and enduring impact on the wellbeing of the clients. I truly want to acknowledge that Kally created a therapeutic environment, probably without even knowing it. She has genuinely gone above and beyond her calling in her profession! I applaud you Kally and I am certain that your clients give you a standing ovation!