Central City Concern

Providing comprehensive solutions to ending homelessness
and achieving self-sufficiency.

CCC Outreach Workers Fill Gaps in Health Care

Oct 21, 2016

On Monday, PBS Newhour aired a fascinating and insightful segment on the rise of utilizing community health workers—already popular in other parts of the world like Sub-Saharan Africa—to better serve vulnerable and hard-to-reach patients. (You can watch the video above or on the PBS website.) As the segment makes clear, community health workers play a vital role in helping patients improve their health.

At Central City Concern, a number of our specialized health care programs rely on Outreach Workers to engage those we serve in direct, meaningful ways that truly exemplify our commitment to meeting patients where they are.

The Community Health Outreach Workers (CHOW) team works to bring individuals who are newly enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (Oregon’s state Medicaid program) into our Primary Care Home, where patients can find barrier-free access, team-based care, integrated mental health and addiction treatment, and additional wellness resources. They’ve also been working with the care teams at Old Town Recovery Center, CCC’s mental health clinic, to help their clients get connected with primary care.

CHOW team members may meet people on the street, at shelters or hospitals, or in their own homes, and often check in with patients to ensure that they are engaged comfortably into the care available to them.

Members of the CCC Health Improvement Projects (CHIPs) team, also known as our Health Resilience Specialists, are embedded in the four main care teams at CCC’s Old Town Clinic (OTC). CHIPs team member work closely with OTC patients (what we call “high touch” support) who have shown a high rate of hospital emergency utilization, helping them decrease unnecessary hospital use by providing intensive case management and addressing social determinants of health. CHIPs team members meet patients at home, on the street, in the hospital, or wherever else the patient needs engagement to happen most.

For those already living in our housing, CCC’s Housed + Healthy team provides a direct pipeline from housing to CCC health care. By performing a needs assessment with new residents as they move into their CCC home, the Housed + Healthy team can identify high needs residents who have gaps in their health care support. The Housed + Healthy team can streamline the referral processes to connect residents to care and even increase coordination between service providers. Further, our Housed + Healthy team provides on-site wellness education programming to encourage healthy living.

The work and impact of Outreach Workers are so important that they can be found beyond the three teams we highlighted here; programs like CCC's Bud Clark Clinic, among others, also lean on Outreach Workers to build relationships with those who are vulnerable in order to connect them with basic health care and services.

The flexibility of CCC’s Outreach Workers allows them to bring care and compassion to our patients. Maintaining and improving health outcomes takes work outside clinic walls, and our Outreach Workers are there to walk that journey with those we serve!

Six health care organizations partner with CCC

Oct 11, 2016

We are so excited about our new collaboration with six Oregon healthcare organizations that was announced on September 23. Adventist Health, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services are joining together to invest $21.5 million in a unique partnership to respond to Portland’s urgent challenges in affordable housing, homelessness and healthcare. This unprecedented collaboration has gained national attention.

The investment will support 382 new housing units across three locations, including one with an integrated health center in Southeast Portland.

Governor Kate Brown said, "This project reflects what we've known for a long time -- health begins where we live, learn, work, and play. Stable, affordable housing and health care access are so often intertwined, and I’m gratified to see collaborative solutions coming from some of our state’s leading organizations. I applaud the efforts of all those involved and am grateful for the partnership in moving Oregon forward and making ours a home where each Oregonian thrives."

"It’s exciting that health care providers recognize the deep connection between housing and health care," said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. "This is exactly the kind of collaboration that our community needs during this housing crisis. None of us can solve homelessness alone. But this collaboration will change hundreds of lives at a critical time of need."

Eastside Health Center will serve medically fragile people and people in recovery from addictions and mental illness with a first-floor clinic and housing for 176 people. The center will also become the new home for an existing Central City Concern program, Eastside Concern, and will offer 24-hour medical staffing on one floor.

Stark Street Apartments in East Portland will provide 155 units of workforce housing.

Interstate Apartments in North Portland will provide 51 units designed for families. It is part of Portland’s North/Northeast Neighborhood Housing Strategy to help displaced residents return to their neighborhood.

This significant contribution is an excellent example of healthcare organizations coming together for the common good of our community. It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those that have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes. This housing will remain affordable for generations and it couldn’t come at a better time.

"Health and home go hand-in-hand," said Nan Roman, President and CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness. "This is a breakthrough collaboration with the health care community and a partnership that has the potential to change the landscape of how we can end homelessness in this country."

Though the health care organizations' contributions are significant, CCC will finance the remainder of the costs, about $37 million, through tax credits, loans and fundraising. Our upcoming capital campaign is an opportunity for everyone to contribute to this project.

• • •

About Housing is Health: The Housing is Health network supports innovative approaches to housing and healthcare in the Portland region.

Learn more at www.centralcityconcern.org/announcement and join the conversation on social media at #HousingisHealth.

See photos from the press conference.

News articles:

- New York Times (AP)
- The Oregonian

September Volunteer Spotlight: Recovery Month Edition

Sep 30, 2016

September is National Recovery Month, a time to celebrate recovery and share stories about how substance use treatment and mental health services have helped people live healthy and rewarding lives. 

This month we were honored to connect with an Employment Access Center (EAC) Clothing Closet volunteer who also identifies as being in recovery. Read how recovery has impacted Dikeeshea’s attitude towards volunteerism, her interactions with others, and her career aspirations.

• • •

Name: Dikeeshea Witherspoon

Position: I volunteer in the clothing closet at the Employment Access Center.

Could you tell me a little about your duties in the clothing closet?
My duties in the clothing closet are going through any clothing that people donate to Central City Concern, [deciding] what I think should be put in the clothing closet and then organizing by size and style. I also help when people come in and need an outfit put together for an interview; they’re looking for a certain size of pants, or a shirt, or if they just need some clothes. It’s fun because me being the age that I am (millennial) I can kind of hit towards the hipper stuff to wear.

What first drew you to Central City Concern?
I was working but I wanted to give back to the community that I took from. Using drugs, stealing, like all of the crazy stuff that comes along with using drugs and drinking and being homeless, I wanted to give back. So I started volunteering at the St. Francis Church in Eugene after two people in recovery told me about it. Boy, was it an experience! To be able to feed the community no matter what walks of life they went through; I was eager to be a part of something like that. I wanted to stay volunteering and after I came to Portland, I wanted to keep being a part of a group. That’s what really pushed me into Central City Concern.

Since coming here do you feel like you’ve become a part of the bigger group?
Oh yes! Especially since I got a nametag and my picture is on it and it says “volunteer” on the bottom. I feel like I’m part of the community just because I am a volunteer. I can walk into the EAC and feel absolutely comfortable. Yeah, it’s homey. I’m there and it’s good for me.

How would you say your recovery has informed your volunteerism and vice versa?
I go to NA meetings and I have a service position, but for me that’s not enough. Being able to volunteer for a community that is the same as what I’m going through or what I’ve been through—like the community of being homeless, the community of looking for a job and trying to survive outside—I feel like it’s helped my recovery tremendously. If I didn’t volunteer, I’m not sure my recovery would’ve blossomed as much as it has. It holds me accountable. Like, if I don’t volunteer am I giving back? I’m not.

I started out doing drugs and drinking and not thinking about who I was hurting, about the people I was hurting outside of myself. You know, like my family, like all the crimes I committed while being under the influence, not worrying about taxpayers money, not worrying about anything. I just didn’t care. But now that I’m clean and sober I see all of the people that I hurt, how much I hurt myself, how just, disgusting I felt inside. And how pure and clean and open I feel now that I’m clean and sober and I’ve been able to help with volunteering and even working. It’s very full circle.

Have you had any experiences in the clothing closet that have stuck with you or just made your day?
So one day there was this gentleman who was really early on in his recovery. He came into the clothing closet and he didn’t have any teeth in and he was really embarrassed. He was talking like his mouth was almost closed and he had his hand over his mouth and I was thinking “oh my gosh, why is he doing that,” you know? And then he said, “Oh, I’m sorry I’m talking muffled, I just don’t have my teeth in. I haven’t got them yet.” And so for somebody to come in and try to find clothes because he has a job interview and he doesn’t even have his teeth yet, that touched my heart. He’s still looking for work and he’s going to go into this interview teeth in or not! I don’t know if I didn’t have teeth in, or if I couldn’t take a shower, or if I couldn’t do my hair or put on makeup, I don’t know if I would have gone to the clothing closet and attempted to get some clothes for an interview or even had an interview.

And I actually saw him just yesterday and he was grinning from ear to ear. He’s been working, and he was just smiling, and I thought “oh my god, that is the same guy that I saw months ago but with all of his teeth now.” They were just bright and shiny. And, every time I see him I think about that because I see him in the community and yeah, it touched me. It gave me hope in people.

Any thoughts or parting words you’d like share?
I would say that Central City Concern has really helped me. It opened up my eyes to see the community of where I came from to the community of where I want to be. It’s opened my eyes to get back into school. This will be the first time, my going to college. It’s helped me to bring it all together to know what I want to do with my life. Being able to talk to people about their job or how they got there and me wanting what they have. I didn’t used to think that way but seeing how many people have walked the same life that I’ve walked and now look at them; so successful. That’s my parting words.

• • •

If you are interested in learning more about volunteer positions at Central City Concern’s health and recovery, housing, or employment programs, contact Eric Reynolds, CCC’s Volunteer Manager, at eric.reynolds@ccconcern.org or visit our volunteer webpage.

Central City Bed®

Central City Bed® - unfriendly to bed bugs, stackable, easy to clean and reuse. Appearing at national trade shows. Check Central City Bed for details. Learn more »

Special Announcement

September 23rd
Health organizations donate $21.5 million to Central City Concern for 382 units of housing and a new health center.  Learn more »

Central City Coffee

Through craft roasting coffee in Portland, OR, Central City Coffee supports the clients and mission of Central City Concern. Available at local retailers and as office coffee! Learn more »