Central City Concern

Providing comprehensive solutions to ending homelessness and achieving self-sufficiency.

Continuing to listen to trans voices

Nov 16, 2017


Happy Transgender Awareness Week 2017! According to GLAAD, this special week, Nov. 13 to Nov. 17, is set aside to “help raise the visibility of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and address the issues the community faces.”

In this space last year, we shared about the numerous steps Central City Concern was taking to ensure that our programs and services, as well as the staff members providing them, were as affirming and inclusive of our transgender patients and clients as possible. This year, we want to provide an update on our efforts to do so!

Trainings: CCC continues to offer trainings year-round to our staff members about working with trans and gender non-binary patients and clients. Several lead staff members have also made it a point to attend trainings hosted by community organizations so they can share what they learn with our program staff.

We continue to encourage our training attendees to approach the sessions from a place of humility. What Eowyn Rieke, CCC’s Associate Medical Director of Primary Care, said last year continues to apply to our approach: “We’re working toward a culture of humility as it relates to gender identity—recognizing that there are great differences at play here and that we need to be humble about our assumptions.”

"We’re working toward a culture of humility as it relates to gender identity—recognizing that there are great differences at play here and that we need to be humble about our assumptions.”
- Eowyn Rieke, Associate Medical Director of Primary Care

CCC Director of Equity and Inclusion Freda Ceaser says that this posture has provided the organization with a blueprint to fully operationalize trans affirming program services across the agency. She says that in the coming year, her goal is to work with every CCC program to begin an initial assessment of procedures and policies to become more trans affirming and inclusive.

“It’s so rewarding to see how the work of health services intentionally recognizes and affirms the identity of each of our patients. I want every person we serve, no matter their gender identity, to feel accepted, valued, and respected.” 

Trans Support Group: Chrysalis, the trans and gender non-binary support group that formed last year in response to what we heard from our patients, has been thriving. Open to patients of Old Town Clinic (OTC) and Old Town Recovery Center (OTRC), Chrysalis is a safe place where, according to facilitator Shanako Devoll, “people can talk about the difficulties of navigating everyday life and strategies used to address safety, mental health, and substance use.”

Group members say that Chrysalis helps them counteract the isolation they can feel by being part of a group that understands each other’s struggles and triumphs. At each session, attendees share their experiences, bring information about resources they’ve come across, and slowly build a community of shared experiences together.

The group meets bi-weekly. While the make-up of each meeting can differ, Chrysalis averages about five attendees each time the group comes together. Chrysalis is currently open to new members; in mid-December, the group will close for six weeks to allow the group members build trust and create the safe space they need.

"I want every person we serve, no matter their gender identity, to feel accepted, valued, and respected.”
- Freda Ceaser, Director of Equity and Inclusion

Electronic Health Records: Thanks to CCC’s amazing EHR implementation team, our health services can now make changes to patients’ gender identification information faster and easier than ever.  

Responding to the Needs of the Trans Community: As we continue to listen to our trans patients, we’re making changes that we believe are positive for them and the larger community.

All our multi-stall bathrooms inside OTC and OTRC now have signs that emphasize our support for individuals using the bathroom that best fits with their gender identity.

To better support trans patients and clients in substance use disorder treatment programs, our services are working toward making our urinalysis collection process more trans affirming.  

And finally, Margot Presley, an OHSU Doctorate of Nursing Practice candidate, used her doctorate project as a way to seek out and listen to trans voices at our Old Town Clinic. Margot’s project, “Patient Engagement in Quality Improvement: Raising the Voice of Transgender Patients Experiencing Homelessness” used patient engagement and qualitative inquiry techniques to interview people about their experiences as trans patients of OTC. Their feedback was used to recommend changes to our clinic operations with the goal of better meeting their needs.

Her manuscript is in process of being published in Transgender Health, “the first peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to addressing the healthcare needs of transgender individual;” Margot also presented a poster showing her work at several conferences. 

• • •

Each year, Trans Awareness Week leads up to the Trans Day of Remembrance on Nov. 20, an observance to honor and remember those whose lives were lost to acts of anti-trans violence. There are a number of events in the Portland metro area to participate in that day. All descriptions are from the event hosts: 

Thursday, Nov. 16
Keynote featuring Jennicet Gutiérrez: How to Get Involved, Hosted by Portland State Temprr Month and PSU Queer Resource Center
: Join us for our TEMPRR keynote panel event with activist Jennicet Gutiérrez! As a founding member of La Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, Gutiérrez's activist experience with transgender rights and immigrant rights has given her great knowledge on how to get involved with various types of activism. This panel will also have local activists who will answer questions and share more about their activism. (Link) 

Friday, Nov. 17
5th Ave. Presents: ReAgitator, hosted at Fifth Avenue Cinema
: Join us in honoring Trans Day of Remembrance a few days early with an incredibly inventive film from independent trans-filmmaker Dylan Greenberg. Her film Re-Agitator: Revenge of The Parody, tells the bizarre story of a mad scientist using a cynical serum to revive a beautiful woman back from the dead leading to complete and total chaos. Using an arsenal of homages and spins off of classic and modern horror, Re-Agitator is bound to satisfy a weird and experimental itch. The film will feature an introduction from Dylan herself, including discussion of her experience with being an indie filmmaker and multi-media artist in NYC. This event will be donation-based instead of our regular ticketing prices, all proceeds will go to the artists. (Link) 

Sunday, Nov. 19
Trans Day of Remembrance March & Interfaith Vigil
: Please all Transgender folk and Cisgender allies join us in reverence and solidarity to honor the fallen and make a stand against Transphobia. We will gather at Terry Schrunk plaza for a staging and a brief program whereupon we will process to the First United Methodist Church for a candle lighting ceremony for the fallen and a message of hope and renewal from local area spiritual leaders followed by a reception where light refreshments will be served. (Link)

Monday, Nov. 20
Transgender Day of Remembrance 2017, hosted at Portland Community College
: This event is being planned by the Portland Transgender community, with the support of Portland Transgender organizations, Portland LGBTQIA2+ organizations, and allies, and is being led by Portland Transgender People of Color. (Link)

Transgender Day of Remembrance Memorial Meeting, hosted at Multnomah Friends Meeting House: We welcome you to join us on this day to mourn and honor the lives of those who have been murdered in the previous year because of anti-transgender hatred.

We gather to remember. We also gather to pray for, and to dedicate ourselves to work for, a world where transgender people are safe from hatred and violence. (Link)



CCC breaks ground on Blackburn Building that will "bring hope and healing to thousands of people like me"

Nov 07, 2017

CCC President & CEO Rachel Solotaroff, MDMultnomah County District 3 Commissioner Jessica Vega PedersonMetro Councilor Shirley Craddick, District 1
Drew Hammond, Assistant Vice President of Business Development for U.S. BankTricia Tillman, a member of the Oregon Housing and Community Services Housing Stability CouncilMelissa Garcia, National Lending Initiatives Director for the Low Income Investment FundHeather Lyons, Director of the Northwest Region at CSHMike Holevas, a community member who has received services through Central City Concern’s Eastside Concern program and lives in CCC’s supportive housingDavid Russell, President and CEO of Adventist Health Portland
Next

On Monday, Nov. 6, Central City Concern ground onthe Blackburn Building, the last of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations to bring 379 units of affordable housing to Portland.

• • •

Yesterday, Nov. 6, Central City Concern (CCC) broke ground on the third of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations to supportive, affordable housing. CCC also announced the name of the building (25 NE 122nd Ave., Portland)—the Blackburn Building—which honors CCC’s President and CEO Emeritus Ed Blackburn, who recently retired after 26 years at CCC. Ed was instrumental in pulling together the Housing is Health initiative, which was the culmination of years of outstanding leadership and relationship building.

The two-story health care facility will serve 3,000 people each year with recovery and mental health services, as well as targeted primary care services. The clinic will include a pharmacy and 52 units of respite care, including 10 units of palliative care. Additional housing will include 90 units of transitional housing and 34 permanent homes. Integrated resident and health support services will help residents stay housed.

The groundbreaking celebration began at 2 p.m. CCC President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., Multnomah County Commissioner Jessica Vega Pederson and Metro Councilor Shirley Craddick spoke about the new project. Other speakers included Tricia Tillman from Oregon Housing and Community Services, Drew Hammond of US Bank, Melissa Garcia of Low Income Investment Fund and Heather Lyons from Corporation for Supportive Housing.

Community member and CCC client Mike Holevas described his journey from high school science teacher to addict, to a person in recovery working toward wellness and self-sufficiency. He once bought drugs on the very corner where the Blackburn Building will be. “This corner now can be the site where thousands who are suffering—and believe me, we suffer—can come for transformation, healing; families will be restored,” he said. “I’m so proud to be part of something that will bring hope and healing to thousands of people like me."

"This corner now can be the site where thousands who are suffering—and believe me, we suffer—can come for transformation, healing; families will be restored.”
- Mike Holevas, former CCC client

Additional speakers included representatives from the Housing is Health initiative’s six hospitals and health organizations: David Russell, Adventist Health Portland president and CEO; Eric C. Hunter, CareOregon president and CEO; Janet O’Hollaren, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals chief operating officer; Mark Enger, OHSU vice president of Network Operations; Pam Mariea-Nason, Providence Health & Services – Oregon executive, Community Health Division; and George Brown, M.D., Legacy Health president & CEO.

“The Housing is Health collaboration is an excellent example of health systems recognizing the impact housing has on an individual’s health,” said Rachel. “They’ve united for improving health outcomes as well as the common good of our community.”

"[The Housing is Health collaborative has] united for improving health outcomes as well as the common good of our community.”
- Rachel Solotaroff, M.D., CCC President & CEO

The developer is Central City Concern, the architect is Ankrom Moisan, the general contractor is Walsh Construction and the construction manager is GLI.

In addition to the Housing is Health partners, funding for the development of the Blackburn Building is provided by Oregon Housing and Community Services, US Bank, Portland Housing Bureau, CSH, Low Income Investment Fund, Oregon Health Authority, Metro, Energy Trust of Oregon and Multnomah County.

CCC is engaged in a $3.5 million capital campaign to complete funding for the Blackburn Building. Early supporters of this campaign include The Collins Foundation; Downtown Community Housing, Inc. Fund of OCF; Harbourton Foundation; The Hearst Foundations; Meyer Memorial Trust; PGE Foundation; Silvey Family Foundation; The Standard; Wells Fargo Housing Foundation; Building Owners & Managers Association of Oregon; Downtown Development Group; Melvin Mark Companies; Meridian Wealth Advisors; R2C Group; Acme Bader Fund of OCF; Brody Family Charitable Fund; Crooke Family Charitable Fund; Ginny & George Charitable Fund; Mitzvah Fund of OCF; the Paul & Sally McCracken Fund of OCF; and numerous individuals.

Find a full list of contributors to the Housing is Health initiative here.

For more information about the campaign or to make a contribution, please contact Kristie Perry, Director of Donor Relations, at 503-200-3926 or kristie.perry@ccconcern.org.



Monthly Volunteer Spotlight: October 2017 Edition

Oct 30, 2017

We’re very excited to turn this month’s spotlight to a volunteer from Puentes, Central City Concern’s culturally-specific program that supports Latinxs in recovery. Developed in 2005, Puentes uses a multidisciplinary approach to provide alcohol and drug treatment and mental health care to individuals and to the entire family in a way that mitigates stigma and fear.

Claudia, this month’s spotlighted volunteer, lends a hand to Puentes’ program that works with Latinx youth ages 14-21 who have drug or alcohol issues or are susceptible to gang involvement, Esperanza Juvenil. Marysol Jimenez, who oversees Esperanza Juvenil, says about Claudia, “It's been a satisfying experience to train a young adult that wants to learn about addiction counseling field, and is interested in working with our Latinx youth.”

Read on to hear how Claudia came to Puentes and how her own experience informs her work.

• • •

Peter: What is your name and volunteer position?

Claudia: Claudia Aparicio, and I’m volunteering at Puentes with Esperanza Juvenil, which in English is Youthful Hope.

P: And what does the Esperanza Juvenil program do?

C: The program is specifically for youth that are struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. It’s a reduction method. Marysol, who is the Esperanza Juvenil staff member, her goal is to get the youth to reduce their addiction. So, sometimes they ask her, “Do we have to quit?” and she’s like, “No, but it would be good if you could quit!” So she works with them in reducing the harm until they stop.

P: How did you find out about CCC?

C: When I was studying for the Certified Recovery Mentor position, [CCC staff member] Ricardo, who helped us get certified, would always call on me and say it would be really cool if I could volunteer with Puentes. He never really told me about the program, but was always trying to get me to volunteer, so finally I ended up coming here to volunteer.

P: I should probably know this, but what is a Certified Recovery Mentor?

C: A Certified Recovery Mentor is a first level of what a certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor would do. So we’re mentors for people that are working to recover from their addiction. I did my certification with the Instituto Latino, so it was a group of Hispanic people [getting certified].

P: How did you get involved with that organization?

C: I knew someone from Volunteers of America who was the one who started the group for Hispanics to get certified as CRMs. I went with a church, called Ministry of Jesus Christ of Men and Women Seeking Lost Souls. We work more with the homeless population, which not a lot of pastors do in the Hispanic area. We go to the streets and try to reach the homeless and give them resources.

P: What do see as the benefit of having a culturally specific program?

C: It just helps to see that there’s a lot of need in the Hispanic community, especially because they don’t really speak English. Ever since I was 19 I’ve been working with the Hispanic population, which I never thought I would do, because I had to help my mom with translations and filling out papers, and so I never saw myself doing that as a grown up. And now that I find myself serving the Hispanic community, trying to get them resources, and telling them where to go for resources, whether it’s a light bill, whether it’s to find an apartment, for a kid’s food boxes or clothing, I see that as a big challenge, because there is a big need in the Hispanic community.

P: And what is the importance of serving youth specifically?

C: I think it’s because they’re in their teen years, so they’re growing up. It’s better to stop or try to reduce the harm when they are young. It’s like a baby when it’s small. When a baby is small, you don’t start disciplining them when they’re 10 years old, because then it’s a little bit late.

P: What are the challenges of that?

C: The challenge is the youth can be a little bit rebellious, but there’s a saying in Spanish that says, “Es más mejor la palabra de una madre ajena quell tu propia madre”— we’d sometimes rather listen to a person that is not our mom than our own mom. Which is true because I lived it, I didn’t listen to my mom, but when I met my pastor I listened to her more.

“There’s a saying in Spanish that says, ‘Es más mejor la palabra de una madre ajena quell tu propia madre’—we’d sometimes rather listen to a person that is not our mom than our own mom.”
- Claudia, CCC Volunteer

P: For those that are rebellious, how do you reach them?

C: We try to talk to them and see where their rebelling comes from, because from my own experience, a kid is going to be rebellious because something happened. Like me, I was rebellious because something happened in my life and there was a root of bitterness in my heart, which made me really stubborn in my teen years and got me in to a lot of trouble as well.

And sometimes we’re young but have to mature faster than our age. I just had to mature a lot younger than I would because of my experience. Especially since I didn’t get disciplined, and sometimes self-discipline is much harder than getting disciplined by your own parent.

P: And it’s hard when you’re older than your years, because your experience is going to be so different from you friends.

C: I had a hard time fitting in school, I always thought I was superior than my classmates. I would just go in my shell and always find the library, because I always liked reading books. I would look for stories that were not relatable to me so I could learn more about other life experiences.

P: And that kind of ties in to what you’re doing now, hearing other people’s stories and being a mentor to people whose experiences may be different from your own. Have there been any particular stories that have stood out?

C: I heard a story of a girl who was getting her treatment here and she was going through the same experiences that I had gone through as a teen. Her mother didn’t try to connect with her and see to her needs, or understand why she was going through what she was going through. A lot of that happens because of culture shock. We’re born here and our parents are from Mexico or Guatemala, or some other Hispanic county, so we learn different things. Whether or not we want it, our culture is American culture, even though our parents are from Spanish-speaking counties. And sometimes we want to adapt to their culture as well, but since we don’t really know about it, we have to research it on the internet. We’re also more free. They didn’t go to school, they had to work, they had to feed the horses and the chickens. We don’t do that. So sometimes our parents don’t realize it’s a bit of culture shock between us and they don’t understand us or they don’t try to understand us. So when I heard that girl’s story, my heart went out to her.

"I learn more every day. I learn from the people here, and I see people I learn a lot from."

P: What keeps you coming back to volunteer?

C: I learn more every day. I learn from the people here, and I see people I learn a lot from.

P: And our traditional last question: What would you say to someone who was on the fence about volunteering with CCC?

C: I would definitely recommend CCC, because it’s a good agency and I’ve learned a lot. And at Puentes, it’s family based. Ever since I came they were like, “We’re a family here. We don’t see any of you guys aslower than us, and when we eat, we eat together.” We don’t eat in our own offices, we’re always eating together in the kitchen, and sometimes we don’t always have room so we’re all squished together, all talking and laughing.

• • •

If you are interested in learning more about volunteer positions in at Central City Concern’s health and recovery, housing, or employment programs, contact Peter Russell, CCC’s Volunteer Manager, at peter.russell@ccconcern.org or visit our volunteer webpage.



Housing is Health

Six health care organizations will invest $21.5 million in a partnership with CCC as a response to Portland’s affordable housing, homelessness, and health care challenges. Learn more »

2016 Annual Report

Download Central City Concern's 2016 Annual Report to find out about the transformative impacts our housing, health care, and employment programs made last year. Learn more »

2017 Compassion in Action

Thanks to all who joined us to celebrate what's possible when the community works together to bring lasting change and to honor Ed Blackburn's 25 years of service. Learn more »